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Recruiting Batallion WOFT Selection Board


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#1 USAR153D

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 22:16

If anyone could give me a heads up on what to expect when I go in front of the WOFT Selection Board held at the Recruiting Battalion level that would be great. Also feedback from individuals who have actually sat on a selection board, preferably recently would be awesome!

Also if there's any scuttlebutt going around about the 'quotas' for 09' lets hear it!

Thanks

Cliff

#2 Rob Lyman

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 20:05

My "board" consisted of driving to St.Augustine from Jacksonville in my Navy uniform, then being told that I would have to come back the following month because I needed a brand new MEPS physical. Once that was completed and waivers were completed a few months later, I was told I did not have to show up and that I would be approved at the next board.

The next month I met someone at a fireworks store off of I-95, signed some papers, then showed up at the next drill. Obviously my experence was different due to my prior experience and rank in the Navy, but I was still surprised at the informal nature of it. I was also VERY surprised by the amount of processing associated with the medical waiver for hearing loss and the clearing of several minor medical non-issue hurdles.

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#3 USAR153D

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 21:44

ok so I found this info on Military.com's WOFT Discussion Board...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


This is a cut and paste from USAREC Reg 601-91 Appendix B. Only applies to College Ops and Prior Service. Not to Active Duty Soldiers currently in service.

If applicant has military experience, use the section on military service included. If not, do not use military service questions. Feel free to
vary the questions somewhat to fit your personal communications style or the background of the applicant. Use questions to pin down behavior--
what the applicant did, information about situations, and the result of any action.

How the Recruiting Battalion will open the interview:

a. Say, “Hello, my name is . I’m president of the Rctg Bn WOFT or OCS
Program Examining Board.” Introduce the other board members.

b. My role today is to discuss with you, some of your background experiences, and then give you a chance to ask any questions you might have about the OCS and WOFT Program. I know that an interview is a somewhat stressful situation, but please relax as much as possible. If we get to know you well, what you have done and hope to do, then, we will have a better idea as to whether the U.S. Army is best suited for your talents and interests. I think you will agree it is in our best interest, as well as yours, for us to become better acquainted before consideration
for the program.

c. We have some questions we would like to ask about your experiences that will take approximately 30 to 45 minutes. Then we will give you a chance to ask questions. So that we do not overlook any important items, we will be taking notes of our discussion. Let’s start with your HS experiences. Which school are you attending? (Did you attend?)

d. Motivation. Interview questions for WOFT (RA or USAR) applicants with no college background.
(1) What were (are) your career goals upon leaving school?
(2) What would you consider your two or three most significant accomplishments in school? Please describe each and why they were significant to you.
(3) Tell us about the subject in which you worked the hardest and succeeded in doing well. To what do you attribute this success?
(4) In what kinds of nonclassroom activities have you participated in school?
(5) Have you worked at part-time or summer jobs while in school. If so, in what capacity and for how long?

e. Initiative. The following questions can be asked relative to academic, extracurricular, or work experiences of the student. Say: “I will now ask some questions about your experiences. You can refer to academic, extracurricular, or work experiences in responding to the questions.”
(1) Tell me about your toughest subject and what you have done to handle it?
(2) In what extracurricular activity have you participated in which you worked the hardest and are most proud of? Please explain.
(3) Give me an example of a school or work event in which the organizing idea was yours. (Other than the one cited in the response to (2) above.
(4) How have you prepared yourself for future growth activity? Preparing for college, vocational, technical, and job market.

f. Planning and organizing.
(1) How do you plan your week to accomplish all the activities in which you are involved? Give a specific example of 1 week.
(2) Describe your method of study for major tests. End of year tests.
(3) Give an example of when you had too much to do. How did you arrange your efforts, as in a priority order?
(4) We all occasionally are late for a class or miss a due date. Give an example of when this happened to you?

g. Influence.
(1) Describe a situation in which you strongly disagreed with a teacher, coach, or supervisor. How did you handle the situation?
(2) In your extracurricular activities, what was the most prominent leadership role you held? What were your major accomplishments here?
(3) Cite an example when you had to negotiate or mediate a dispute between two persons or groups. How did you handle it?
(4) Have you ever had to help another student in school or in extracurricular events? Please describe what you did.

h. Judgment.
(1) Describe the alternative colleges, vocational, or technical schools that you have considered attending and the reasons for their consideration?
(2) Each of us must occasionally make a tough decision. Describe your most recent tough decision and how you went about reaching a solution?
(3) If you could take back one decision you have made in the last 2 years, what would it be? Why?

i. Career motivation.
(1) Why does the U.S. Army interest you?
(2) What are your career plans at this time?
(3) What has been your most satisfying experience in work or school to date. Please explain.
(4) What has been your least satisfying experience in work or school to date. Please explain.

j. Military experience. This series of questions should be asked of those applicants with military experience.

Career motivation.
(1) Why did you join the service?
(2) Please describe your last two positions in the military: Rank, job title, time in position, and responsibilities.
(3) In which jobs or tasks did you gain the greatest amount of satisfaction?
(4) Which positions or tasks did you find most frustrating? Why?
(5) Why did you leave the service?

k. After checking your notes, ask the following:
(1) What are your thoughts on my questions?
(2) Do you have any unanswered questions or followup questions?
(3) Then say, “Now I would like to explain the OCS or WOFT Program and answer any questions you may have”. Explain the appropriate OCS or WOFT selection process and training. (Include dates packet will go to USAREC selection board, date of board, and anticipated date for board results.)
(4) Ask the applicant if he or she has any questions regarding the OCS or WOFT Program.
(5) Close the interview by thanking the applicant for his or her interest, and explain when he or she will be hearing the results of the selection
process.


Procedures for rating applicants

a. Review your notes and add any behavior you can recall which you did not write down.
b. Address specific strengths and weaknesses brought out in the interview.
c. Board member’s comments should also address areas such as:
(1) Vacant period between jobs.
(2) Poor GPA versus test scores.
(3) Law violations.
(4) Leadership positions held.
(5) Explain any other discrepancies contained in the packet.



The following I cut and paste from Armyocs.com so I give credit to their moderator armyocs_recruitment.

There she be,
CB6

Be confident not arrogant.

Sell your strong points.

Be prepared to explain your weak points.

Put Duty, Honor, Country in there.

Know your current events.

Be prepared for the "tell us a little about yourself" at the start.

Make eye contact. Maybe shake the hands at the end and thank them. PS would not shake hands but maybe it's ok for civilians. (You would be surprised of the amount of people that sit in there and rock and fidget)

At the end they will ask do you have any questions. - Have a few good ones. Maybe like: Sir, what branch are you and why do you like it? Sir, what Branch is the cutting edge of the Army today? Sir, why did you join? Sir, what has been the high and low points of your career. etc

Have your Recruiter rehearse with you the entrance and reporting procedures. Once you're at the Battalion go see the room if possible and do a reporting procedure on site rehearsal.


Boardroom entrance and reporting procedures:

The Boardroom will be a standard nice office boardroom as you see on TV. Normally with a big long table with 3 chairs for the two Captains and one Major (normally) and one chair on the other side for YOU!

The door to the Boardroom will be closed. When instructed, go to the door and firmly (not hard) knock two or three times. Once told to enter, do so. Close the door behind you without looking at it. Walk to the center of the large table and stand between the table and the single chair there for you (facing the middle officer on the other side of the table). Stand straight with your heels together, feet pointed out at a 45 degree angle, arms down to your side with fingers curved almost to a fist with thumbs straight (position of attention). Say something like "Sir John Smith reports to the president of the Board" (salute if military and in uniform). The president will tell you take your seat. Don't turn around and look at the chair. But don't fall down either. If civilian, unbutton your jacket (I always used this as an indicator of a person's knowledge - more than half would not unbutton the jacket and just sit down). Sit up straght. Put your hands on the top of your thighs with your fingers slightly curved into your downward facing palms (NO ROCK - NO FIGIT!!). Make eye contact with every member as to scan the three of them. Make sure you call them "sir" ie "yes sir I was born in Montana". It's not "sir I was born in Montana sir" as in Animal House or Major Pain. Answer their questions to the best of your ability – not too short but not a long dissertation. You can take a few seconds to gather your thoughts before you answer the question. Continue to make eye contact as you answer the question. The president will tell you what is about to happen and might ask if you have questions. Personally I wouldn't ask a question at the start. As stated above have a few questions for the end of the board. Once you're told the Board is over, stand up straight and tell them thank you for the opportunity ....BS. Maybe shake their hand maybe not - hard to say. Personally the rare the handshake happened, I liked it.

While I'm not permitted to talk about what happened in the Board (and have no intention of doing so), I will say that this is definitely a good guideline of what to expect. Thick skin is a must as the Board will harshly criticize all parts of your packet they view as questionable so be prepared. Feel free to ask any other general questions as the experience is still fresh in my mind. Good luck to those up at USAREC this month.

#4 Mymm

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 21:58

ok so I found this info on Military.com's WOFT Discussion Board...

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


This is a cut and paste from USAREC Reg 601-91 Appendix B. Only applies to College Ops and Prior Service. Not to Active Duty Soldiers currently in service.

If applicant has military experience, use the section on military service included. If not, do not use military service questions. Feel free to
vary the questions somewhat to fit your personal communications style or the background of the applicant. Use questions to pin down behavior--
what the applicant did, information about situations, and the result of any action.

How the Recruiting Battalion will open the interview:

a. Say, “Hello, my name is . I’m president of the Rctg Bn WOFT or OCS
Program Examining Board.” Introduce the other board members.

b. My role today is to discuss with you, some of your background experiences, and then give you a chance to ask any questions you might have about the OCS and WOFT Program. I know that an interview is a somewhat stressful situation, but please relax as much as possible. If we get to know you well, what you have done and hope to do, then, we will have a better idea as to whether the U.S. Army is best suited for your talents and interests. I think you will agree it is in our best interest, as well as yours, for us to become better acquainted before consideration
for the program.

c. We have some questions we would like to ask about your experiences that will take approximately 30 to 45 minutes. Then we will give you a chance to ask questions. So that we do not overlook any important items, we will be taking notes of our discussion. Let’s start with your HS experiences. Which school are you attending? (Did you attend?)

d. Motivation. Interview questions for WOFT (RA or USAR) applicants with no college background.
(1) What were (are) your career goals upon leaving school?
(2) What would you consider your two or three most significant accomplishments in school? Please describe each and why they were significant to you.
(3) Tell us about the subject in which you worked the hardest and succeeded in doing well. To what do you attribute this success?
(4) In what kinds of nonclassroom activities have you participated in school?
(5) Have you worked at part-time or summer jobs while in school. If so, in what capacity and for how long?

e. Initiative. The following questions can be asked relative to academic, extracurricular, or work experiences of the student. Say: “I will now ask some questions about your experiences. You can refer to academic, extracurricular, or work experiences in responding to the questions.”
(1) Tell me about your toughest subject and what you have done to handle it?
(2) In what extracurricular activity have you participated in which you worked the hardest and are most proud of? Please explain.
(3) Give me an example of a school or work event in which the organizing idea was yours. (Other than the one cited in the response to (2) above.
(4) How have you prepared yourself for future growth activity? Preparing for college, vocational, technical, and job market.

f. Planning and organizing.
(1) How do you plan your week to accomplish all the activities in which you are involved? Give a specific example of 1 week.
(2) Describe your method of study for major tests. End of year tests.
(3) Give an example of when you had too much to do. How did you arrange your efforts, as in a priority order?
(4) We all occasionally are late for a class or miss a due date. Give an example of when this happened to you?

g. Influence.
(1) Describe a situation in which you strongly disagreed with a teacher, coach, or supervisor. How did you handle the situation?
(2) In your extracurricular activities, what was the most prominent leadership role you held? What were your major accomplishments here?
(3) Cite an example when you had to negotiate or mediate a dispute between two persons or groups. How did you handle it?
(4) Have you ever had to help another student in school or in extracurricular events? Please describe what you did.

h. Judgment.
(1) Describe the alternative colleges, vocational, or technical schools that you have considered attending and the reasons for their consideration?
(2) Each of us must occasionally make a tough decision. Describe your most recent tough decision and how you went about reaching a solution?
(3) If you could take back one decision you have made in the last 2 years, what would it be? Why?

i. Career motivation.
(1) Why does the U.S. Army interest you?
(2) What are your career plans at this time?
(3) What has been your most satisfying experience in work or school to date. Please explain.
(4) What has been your least satisfying experience in work or school to date. Please explain.

j. Military experience. This series of questions should be asked of those applicants with military experience.

Career motivation.
(1) Why did you join the service?
(2) Please describe your last two positions in the military: Rank, job title, time in position, and responsibilities.
(3) In which jobs or tasks did you gain the greatest amount of satisfaction?
(4) Which positions or tasks did you find most frustrating? Why?
(5) Why did you leave the service?

k. After checking your notes, ask the following:
(1) What are your thoughts on my questions?
(2) Do you have any unanswered questions or followup questions?
(3) Then say, “Now I would like to explain the OCS or WOFT Program and answer any questions you may have”. Explain the appropriate OCS or WOFT selection process and training. (Include dates packet will go to USAREC selection board, date of board, and anticipated date for board results.)
(4) Ask the applicant if he or she has any questions regarding the OCS or WOFT Program.
(5) Close the interview by thanking the applicant for his or her interest, and explain when he or she will be hearing the results of the selection
process.


Procedures for rating applicants

a. Review your notes and add any behavior you can recall which you did not write down.
b. Address specific strengths and weaknesses brought out in the interview.
c. Board member’s comments should also address areas such as:
(1) Vacant period between jobs.
(2) Poor GPA versus test scores.
(3) Law violations.
(4) Leadership positions held.
(5) Explain any other discrepancies contained in the packet.



The following I cut and paste from Armyocs.com so I give credit to their moderator armyocs_recruitment.

There she be,
CB6

Be confident not arrogant.

Sell your strong points.

Be prepared to explain your weak points.

Put Duty, Honor, Country in there.

Know your current events.

Be prepared for the "tell us a little about yourself" at the start.

Make eye contact. Maybe shake the hands at the end and thank them. PS would not shake hands but maybe it's ok for civilians. (You would be surprised of the amount of people that sit in there and rock and fidget)

At the end they will ask do you have any questions. - Have a few good ones. Maybe like: Sir, what branch are you and why do you like it? Sir, what Branch is the cutting edge of the Army today? Sir, why did you join? Sir, what has been the high and low points of your career. etc

Have your Recruiter rehearse with you the entrance and reporting procedures. Once you're at the Battalion go see the room if possible and do a reporting procedure on site rehearsal.


Boardroom entrance and reporting procedures:

The Boardroom will be a standard nice office boardroom as you see on TV. Normally with a big long table with 3 chairs for the two Captains and one Major (normally) and one chair on the other side for YOU!

The door to the Boardroom will be closed. When instructed, go to the door and firmly (not hard) knock two or three times. Once told to enter, do so. Close the door behind you without looking at it. Walk to the center of the large table and stand between the table and the single chair there for you (facing the middle officer on the other side of the table). Stand straight with your heels together, feet pointed out at a 45 degree angle, arms down to your side with fingers curved almost to a fist with thumbs straight (position of attention). Say something like "Sir John Smith reports to the president of the Board" (salute if military and in uniform). The president will tell you take your seat. Don't turn around and look at the chair. But don't fall down either. If civilian, unbutton your jacket (I always used this as an indicator of a person's knowledge - more than half would not unbutton the jacket and just sit down). Sit up straght. Put your hands on the top of your thighs with your fingers slightly curved into your downward facing palms (NO ROCK - NO FIGIT!!). Make eye contact with every member as to scan the three of them. Make sure you call them "sir" ie "yes sir I was born in Montana". It's not "sir I was born in Montana sir" as in Animal House or Major Pain. Answer their questions to the best of your ability – not too short but not a long dissertation. You can take a few seconds to gather your thoughts before you answer the question. Continue to make eye contact as you answer the question. The president will tell you what is about to happen and might ask if you have questions. Personally I wouldn't ask a question at the start. As stated above have a few questions for the end of the board. Once you're told the Board is over, stand up straight and tell them thank you for the opportunity ....BS. Maybe shake their hand maybe not - hard to say. Personally the rare the handshake happened, I liked it.

While I'm not permitted to talk about what happened in the Board (and have no intention of doing so), I will say that this is definitely a good guideline of what to expect. Thick skin is a must as the Board will harshly criticize all parts of your packet they view as questionable so be prepared. Feel free to ask any other general questions as the experience is still fresh in my mind. Good luck to those up at USAREC this month.



I was pretty much told for 30 min that I was totally worthless and the biggest piece of crap to ever apply to flight school.

I got max points.../shrug

#5 USAR153D

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 22:27

I was pretty much told for 30 min that I was totally worthless and the biggest piece of crap to ever apply to flight school.

I got max points.../shrug


Were you a civilian applicant?

#6 BillyBob

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 22:38

It's been ~13 years but my board was at a conference table with one Major and two Captains. One arty, one infantry, and one armor - all combat arms guys. Some where in that reg is a blurb giving the board president latitude to do what he/she wants.

My board president welcomed me in the room and asked me to get comfortable. Then he said: "we are going to ask you to tell us about yourself and what you have done since high school, finally we will ask you some questions; Now tell us what you've done since high school..."

I was 'on' for about 5-10 minutes. Then I was asked questions about why I wanted to be a Warrant when I had a college degree. ( I am always amazed at that question...anyhow) I was asked about combat and what I thought about being shot at'. Everything else was a blur. Mostly my board was trying to get a feel for who I was and then looking for 'bullets' to place in the remarks to support their assessment.

#7 USAR153D

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 23:00

It's been ~13 years but my board was at a conference table with one Major and two Captains. One arty, one infantry, and one armor - all combat arms guys. Some where in that reg is a blurb giving the board president latitude to do what he/she wants.

My board president welcomed me in the room and asked me to get comfortable. Then he said: "we are going to ask you to tell us about yourself and what you have done since high school, finally we will ask you some questions; Now tell us what you've done since high school..."

I was 'on' for about 5-10 minutes. Then I was asked questions about why I wanted to be a Warrant when I had a college degree. ( I am always amazed at that question...anyhow) I was asked about combat and what I thought about being shot at'. Everything else was a blur. Mostly my board was trying to get a feel for who I was and then looking for 'bullets' to place in the remarks to support their assessment.



So from what I'm gathering the USAREC Battalion level board remarks/assessment don't necessarily guarantee whether or not you/your packet are selected by the board @ Rucker?

#8 BillyBob

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Posted 28 February 2009 - 23:49

So from what I'm gathering the USAREC Battalion level board remarks/assessment don't necessarily guarantee whether or not you/your packet are selected by the board @ Rucker?



My understanding is that the USAREC board is a check/balance designed to have several officers assess a potential recruit in person. It is just one step in the process.

My board can be condensed to this: "Can I trust this young man to support me in combat?"

Edited by BillyBob, 28 February 2009 - 23:49.


#9 dnall

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 17:48

My board can be condensed to this: "Can I trust this young man to support me in combat?"

Better know as, "is this guy a douche or would I be willing to fly with him/put my life in his hands for the next 20 years?" You can't answer that question in a paper packet. You need a board &/or series of interviews to assess the human factors.

#10 Mymm

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 11:20

I was considered a civilian applicant even though I was in the Air Guard at the time. Was specifically told not to wear my class A's.

#11 USAR153D

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Posted 02 March 2009 - 12:06

I was considered a civilian applicant even though I was in the Air Guard at the time. Was specifically told not to wear my class A's.

Yeah thats what the recruiters are telling me that since I'm a Reservist my application process for the WOFT Program is similar to that of civilians minus me being conditionally released from the Marine Reserve as well as having the military experience that a civilian wouldnt have.




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