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A valuable lesson as a new guy


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#1 Fred0311

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 14:28

I had my first experience with poor ADM today and learned a valuable lesson as a new guy. The little checklist the school has you do to decide if your good to fly, be honest on it. I had three significant personal stressors come into my life in quick succession recently but because of the pressure I put on myself to excel I ignored them and decided to do my flight today anyway. My flying was absolute garbage and my instructor was wondering what the hell had happend to his student. So I called off the flight after two patterns. Lesson learned, don't try to just tough stuff out. And maybe it's not a good idea to put this out for all to see but I'll be less likely to do something similar because of it and maybe someone else won't make the same mistake.
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#2 heloidaho

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 16:57

Great advice. Especially if you are flying as a crew since you are responsible for more than just yourself. Giving the other person flying a heads up on stress can make them fly with more awareness. Thanks for sharing the lesson learned.
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#3 Wally

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:18

OFS! (Good job)

Just a pilot (retired, so I have a LOT of time)...


#4 AS350 pilot

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 12:21

Good catch on yourself. I found this to effect me more as a student during the large learning curve. Often as a student your personal stresses have to do with learning to fly, checkrides, studying, money, etc. Catch 22 right? lol

When you get into flying for a career, the stress doesn't stop; however, you just have to learn how to deal with it. In regard to personal stress at home, going to work and flying is a great release for me! Know yourself and stay safe out there!

#5 500E

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 16:29

Learning the FI could allways tell how work was by my flying,stress a strange thing!
Fly the dream fly 500

#6 kodoz

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 19:31

So I called off the flight after two patterns.


Recognizing when things aren't going according to plan, and reconsidering your original plan, is an ADM win.
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#7 herceng

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 03:15

Excellent post Fred0311 (former Marine?...just curious..0311..anyway),
It's hard for a lot of people (myself included) to be completely objective about your readiness to fly when we tend to have motivated, success-oriented personalities. To walk into the ready room and say "I can't fly today 'cuz I'm really bummed out about...blah, blah, blah" often feels like that proverbial weakness that we often strive to overcome. But, as you found out, that doens't always work.
This pressure is greatest when you get to your first unit (military) or land your first job. As the new person, you always want to impress everyone with your abilities and work ethic. Bagging flights for this reason or that may seem next to impossible, especially when your reasons are personal and you may not want to discuss them with anyone. But you know yourself and have to make the right call. I've found that instead of people looking down on you for bagging a flight, they're more likely to respect and trust the judgement that you demonstrate.
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#8 Fred0311

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 14:17

Good catch on the 0311. I just got out in April. I learned my lesson that day though. As far as stress goes I'm sure with more experience it's easier to not allow it to affect your flying, but as a student it was too much to handle.

#9 aeroscout

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 14:58

Good topic, and good post Marine. You guys might know best about the suck it up and drive on attitude. This brings to mind another idea for a topic, "The perfect excuse not to fly" I have a couple of nominations. "I have the Lumpuckeroo". "Myfundzarelow" , and "I feel too good to fly today". That last one might not be perfect I must admit.




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