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H.E.M.S. Pilot Path

hems pilot privateschool

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#21 Velocity173

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 06:57

 
A little off-topic and late to the party, but...is there actually hard evidence that helicopter dual pilot ops are safer than single pilot?  I'm sincerely doubtful, but also sincerely curious.  I've looked and haven't found it, myself...anyone else?


Well if you read some of Randy Main's articles, he suggests it is. Approximately 80 % safer than single pilot VFR. He's the EMS & CRM guru so I suppose he'd know.

Personally I don't lay awake at night worrying about how safe single pilot is compared to dual. I have more safety enhancements on my aircraft than any Part 91 piston single engine helo or FW on the market. No one is up in arms when some guy crashes his Bonanza and kills 4 people. When we crash however, because of the nature of the job, the accidents make news and our safety records scrutinized. The FAA just needs to accept that HEMS can be a demanding and dynamic flight profile and with that, accidents will happen.
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#22 Mikemv

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 08:03

 

A little off-topic and late to the party, but...is there actually hard evidence that helicopter dual pilot ops are safer than single pilot?  I'm sincerely doubtful, but also sincerely curious.  I've looked and haven't found it, myself...anyone else?

Heidi,

 

Contact Randy Mains thru Rotorcraft Prof. mag.

 

He will give you the data.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Mike


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#23 BH206L3

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 08:07

Well I fly both airplanes and helicopters , did EMS in both, its a boreing job, I didn't like my crew much and I just kept to myself, I learned a long time ago,  you have no friends offshore or at the hospital! Being a person who like being by himself, it didn't take me long to figuire out, its not the job for me, for some it is - Night frieight or Bush work is more my thing so I just do that! I been at this for going on 40 years now, and it looks like I will be ending it flying a PC-12NG, an aircraft that I wanted to fly for some time now, they also have a helicopter so I will be flying both airframes at times! And plenty of time to just go fish, i been more interested in the trout than flying for quite some time now, I do one so that I can do the other!


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#24 Flying Pig

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 08:36

 The FAA just needs to accept that HEMS can be a demanding and dynamic flight profile and with that, accidents will happen.

You mean the same FAA that sent a load of inspectors to NVG school and then failed to keep any of them current so they could give endorsements? :D   I know.... off topic, but its the thorn in my side this week.


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#25 Wally

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 11:40

 

A little off-topic and late to the party, but...is there actually hard evidence that helicopter dual pilot ops are safer than single pilot?  I'm sincerely doubtful, but also sincerely curious.  I've looked and haven't found it, myself...anyone else?

 

Yes, I've seen the numbers but I can't remember where. I think it was a European equivalent of the Gulf's HSAC. Two pilots make a much bigger difference than airframe specifics- two engines, autopilots, etc. It's hard to separate other factors that might contribute to the improvement, like different environment and the operational philosophy. It's clearer than light twins, where the operator's training and safety culture determine the safety advantage or lack.


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Just a pilot (retired, so I have a LOT of time)...


#26 Velocity173

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 14:54

You mean the same FAA that sent a load of inspectors to NVG school and then failed to keep any of them current so they could give endorsements? :D   I know.... off topic, but its the thorn in my side this week.

I hear ya. I love the new risk assessment the FAA has implemented this year along with the Operations Control Center guy who reviews it. Doesn't matter what you're doing, it's still low risk. I don't need some form to give me number and tell me I'm "green." I already know the risks involved. FAA is completely out of touch with what we do.

Sorry, I know that's off topic but that's my thorn in my side this week. 😉

Edited by Velocity173, 19 March 2015 - 15:11.

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#27 Gomer Pylot

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Posted 20 March 2015 - 08:37

The FAA is clueless, always has been, always will be.  Those who can, fly, and those who can't, go to the FAA.


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Best Regards,

Gomer

#28 Francis Meyrick

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Posted 05 July 2015 - 11:17

 

I didn't like my crew much and I just kept to myself, I learned a long time ago,  you have no friends offshore or at the hospital!

Um. :unsure:

 

I have many failings, and an infernal curiosity to figure out the other guy is probably one of them. After ten years in the Gulf Oil Patch, plus North Sea before that, plus Africa, plus....  I can honestly say I had a bunch of good buddies out there. All over. Flying out or back, or merely chatting in the galley on an oil rig, I rarely lacked conversation and good company. Those guys were often funny as hell, once you got to know them. Everybody's got a story.  From the welder to the cook, or the roustabout to the Company Man, the range of personalities and life's stories was inexhaustible.

 

Now, here's a funny thing. The number of times I would get a warm welcome from the oncoming passengers, and some comment along the lines of:

"It's Francis! Good to see ya, man! The pilot that talks to us!"

And I would say:

"Doesn't everybody?"

And they would say: "No! A lot of pilots we get don't say Sh....! They just fly along, and totally ignore us!"

And the next thing, we would be flying along, somebody's telling a funny story, or commenting how there's no Democrat voters (apparently) working in the Gulf,  or we would be off debating the Great Mysteries of the Universe, (like women), and we would be having a rip roaring old time.

 

Coming from that into Air Medical, sure, big change. Back to the drawing board, figuring things out. But from the git-go, there were crew members who were happy and willing to sit down and chat, and give help on the subject of promoting happiness in the cockpit. 

 

I'm thinking (occasionally) (it's hard work) that Life is like a one-armed bandit. You'll probably get out roughly in proportion to what you put in. Less a cut for the Casino of Life, of course.

 

Just sayin'...

 

;)


Edited by Francis Meyrick, 05 July 2015 - 11:19.

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"Flying is a Privilege, and not a Right"

 

 

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#29 Flint950

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Posted 01 August 2015 - 09:03

I've heard the mishap rate for HEMS in Canada and other countries is less than half of what it is in the U.S. People claiming to know what they're talking about say this is because of the two pilot requirement. Since paying for a second pilot's wages/benefits will affect the bottom line, HEMS outfits in this country will always resist the two pilot rule. It's always been hard to convince the bean counter that a second pilot will always be cheaper than a new aircraft plus legal fees in the event of a fatal accident.

Are two pilots always safer than one? I would argue it depends on the pilots.

#30 Flying Pig

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 08:11

Ive heard if you attend ULA, their pilot graduates are in high demand for EMS.  It says so on their FB page.  And they even posted that they will block you and delete your comments if you say anything to the contrary :) 



#31 Wally

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 14:21

I've heard the mishap rate for HEMS in Canada and other countries is less than half of what it is in the U.S. People claiming to know what they're talking about say this is because of the two pilot requirement. Since paying for a second pilot's wages/benefits will affect the bottom line, HEMS outfits in this country will always resist the two pilot rule. It's always been hard to convince the bean counter that a second pilot will always be cheaper than a new aircraft plus legal fees in the event of a fatal accident.

Are two pilots always safer than one? I would argue it depends on the pilots.

 

Training; Safety culture; Equipment, in that order, and then- 2 pilots.

A well trained pilot with good support in a realistic safety culture using the appropriate equipment is nearly as good a the two pilot crew in a similar environment.

Two pilots, like two engines and IFR capability, must be part of a well thought out system and trained to use and maximize the advantages. If that's not so, then the second pilot, like the second engine, is a systems complication and source of extra problems.

My understanding is that the USA HEMS is much less restrictive than those of other countries.


Edited by Wally, 04 August 2015 - 14:51.

Just a pilot (retired, so I have a LOT of time)...






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