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is EASA the same as FAA, regarding helicopters?

faa part 135 euro airbus helicopter operator air medical EMS offshore government regulation

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#1 chris pochari

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Posted 30 June 2017 - 07:17

I'm trying to familiarize myself with the Euro aviation system.


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#2 Eric Hunt

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 22:13

Geez, Chris, you annoy the heck out of the professionals on Peaproon, refuse to listen to their advice and speak like you are an expert on all aspects of the industry, say "I am going back to vert Ref" but keep on posting, and now you put the same rubbish up here.



#3 chris pochari

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 23:22

Geez, Chris, you annoy the heck out of the professionals on Peaproon, refuse to listen to their advice and speak like you are an expert on all aspects of the industry, say "I am going back to vert Ref" but keep on posting, and now you put the same rubbish up here.

 

You are a serious troll, and/or a total d1ckhead. Potential president material.

I'm going Europe for helicopter flight school and wanted to learn the different regulations. 



#4 Eric Hunt

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 02:28

listen and learn is what the old heads are telling you, many times over. Yes you are good at looking up lots of references, 10 points for that.



#5 Renaud

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 04:27

Poor Chris,

 

You will miss the easy FAA ruling.

I can say EASA is not FAA in any ways.

 

EASA is not an agency who can enforce regulations.

 

It is a political branch who looks like a federal agency, but tit's not.

EASA can only publish recommendations, each countries have to pass it in the laws, which can choose to be more restrictive.

 

Your license is managed by the country where you live, or the country where your employer is based, not by the EASA itself.

 

Be familiar with the EASA structure is a good start, I'll put the link at the end.

 

From Helo side, each countries has is own view of the business.

You need to check with the country civil aviation authority you plan to be.

 

Just to give you an example: Off Airport landing

 

I'm a Swiss helicopter pilot, leaving in this small but beautiful country surrounded by Germany, Austria, Italy and France.

 

In Switzerland, I can land everywhere I want, as far as I'm more than 300m from any kind of human construction, and don't disturb any people or livestock.

 

In France: I need a special training with a skill test, plus a yearly authorization to do so, I need to call police BEFORE and tell them exactly WHERE and WHEN I will land.

 

In Germany, nothing like this is authorized any more, you need to pass a security screening, motivate why you want to land outside an airport.

 

In Austria this is more relax, but still, you need to proof you are a good guy and not an alien!

 

Italy I didn't try yet.

 

1. Forget to overfly cities like in USA, only twin engines over dedicated routes can do it

(Except for London, they have a single engine route over the Thames, you can go to get a coffee with style down there... but need the cash of Clooney to pay the landing fee)

 

2. Bear in mind, each time you want to cross a border, you need to fill a flight plan, sometimes you need to stop at international airport to clear customs (UK <-> EU, CH <-> EU)

 

3. EU is fully crowded with airspaces, be ready to chat on radio, phraseology is also an issue for US/CAN guys, EU stick to ICAO standard 110% :lol:

 

I've seen native English speakers denied a level 6, and get level 4 by authorities because of their accent or non conformance to strict ICAO RT! :blink:

 

But flying in EU is a real eyes opener and its really nice.

If you have any questions I might help, PM me!

 

Have fun,

 

Renaud

 

EASA Basic Structure


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Never below 200, except for altitude!...

#6 r22butters

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 10:27

Poor Chris,
 
You will miss the easy FAA ruling.
I can say EASA is not FAA in any ways.
 
EASA is not an agency who can enforce regulations.
 
It is a political branch who looks like a federal agency, but tit's not.
EASA can only publish recommendations, each countries have to pass it in the laws, which can choose to be more restrictive.
 
Your license is managed by the country where you live, or the country where your employer is based, not by the EASA itself.
 
Be familiar with the EASA structure is a good start, I'll put the link at the end.
 
From Helo side, each countries has is own view of the business.
You need to check with the country civil aviation authority you plan to be.
 
Just to give you an example: Off Airport landing
 
I'm a Swiss helicopter pilot, leaving in this small but beautiful country surrounded by Germany, Austria, Italy and France.
 
In Switzerland, I can land everywhere I want, as far as I'm more than 300m from any kind of human construction, and don't disturb any people or livestock.
 
In France: I need a special training with a skill test, plus a yearly authorization to do so, I need to call police BEFORE and tell them exactly WHERE and WHEN I will land.
 
In Germany, nothing like this is authorized any more, you need to pass a security screening, motivate why you want to land outside an airport.
 
In Austria this is more relax, but still, you need to proof you are a good guy and not an alien!
 
Italy I didn't try yet.
 
1. Forget to overfly cities like in USA, only twin engines over dedicated routes can do it
(Except for London, they have a single engine route over the Thames, you can go to get a coffee with style down there... but need the cash of Clooney to pay the landing fee)
 
2. Bear in mind, each time you want to cross a border, you need to fill a flight plan, sometimes you need to stop at international airport to clear customs (UK EU, CH EU)
 
3. EU is fully crowded with airspaces, be ready to chat on radio, phraseology is also an issue for US/CAN guys, EU stick to ICAO standard 110% :lol:
 
I've seen native English speakers denied a level 6, and get level 4 by authorities because of their accent or non conformance to strict ICAO RT! :blink:
 
But flying in EU is a real eyes opener and its really nice.
If you have any questions I might help, PM me!
 
Have fun,
 
Renaud
 
EASA Basic Structure


Hmmm, is this rules for helicopters in Europe, or CCW rules here in the States,...which would make Germany, California of course! :D

One thing's clear though, recreational butters ain't movin' to no eeur ope! :o
The only dream I have left is to live long enough to see the pilot shortage. Its been about fourteen years since they first told me it was coming, so,...

Aaaaaaaany day now! :D

#7 chris pochari

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 13:03

Poor Chris,

 

You will miss the easy FAA ruling.

I can say EASA is not FAA in any ways.

 

EASA is not an agency who can enforce regulations.

 

It is a political branch who looks like a federal agency, but tit's not.

EASA can only publish recommendations, each countries have to pass it in the laws, which can choose to be more restrictive.

 

Your license is managed by the country where you live, or the country where your employer is based, not by the EASA itself.

 

Be familiar with the EASA structure is a good start, I'll put the link at the end.

 

From Helo side, each countries has is own view of the business.

You need to check with the country civil aviation authority you plan to be.

 

Just to give you an example: Off Airport landing

 

I'm a Swiss helicopter pilot, leaving in this small but beautiful country surrounded by Germany, Austria, Italy and France.

 

In Switzerland, I can land everywhere I want, as far as I'm more than 300m from any kind of human construction, and don't disturb any people or livestock.

 

In France: I need a special training with a skill test, plus a yearly authorization to do so, I need to call police BEFORE and tell them exactly WHERE and WHEN I will land.

 

In Germany, nothing like this is authorized any more, you need to pass a security screening, motivate why you want to land outside an airport.

 

In Austria this is more relax, but still, you need to proof you are a good guy and not an alien!

 

Italy I didn't try yet.

 

1. Forget to overfly cities like in USA, only twin engines over dedicated routes can do it

(Except for London, they have a single engine route over the Thames, you can go to get a coffee with style down there... but need the cash of Clooney to pay the landing fee)

 

2. Bear in mind, each time you want to cross a border, you need to fill a flight plan, sometimes you need to stop at international airport to clear customs (UK <-> EU, CH <-> EU)

 

3. EU is fully crowded with airspaces, be ready to chat on radio, phraseology is also an issue for US/CAN guys, EU stick to ICAO standard 110% :lol:

 

I've seen native English speakers denied a level 6, and get level 4 by authorities because of their accent or non conformance to strict ICAO RT! :blink:

 

But flying in EU is a real eyes opener and its really nice.

If you have any questions I might help, PM me!

 

Have fun,

 

Renaud

 

EASA Basic Structure

Thank you, this is exactly what I was looking for.







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