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Question for the AH-64 Drivers

ah-64 apache us army warrant officer

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#1 ByteFlighter

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 21:46

Hopefully some of the current US Army warrants can shed light on this.

 

Besides individual mission of your assigned unit (attack/Recon). How much actual hands-on flying do NEW warrants get straight out of flight school with the Apache? 

 

Is it mostly front seat/gunner-focused for new guys? I understand the front seat has a collapsible cyclic, but is it ever really utilized if you occupy the forward cockpit? If not gunner focused for new guys, do most guys switch back and forth? And finally, How often are you guys doing XC flights to regional airports for a bite to eat? lol - I used to see 12th AvB's 60s at my regional AP's FBO/Diner during civilian flight school all the time before I got into WOFT.

 

Thanks



#2 Vaelor

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 01:24

Hundreds of variables ultimately decide how much a WOJG flies. Many of them are completely out of your control.

 

As a general rule, the more professional you are in your interactions with members of your new unit, the more you'll fly.

 

An AH-64 Aviator must be capable of flying from either seat at any time. New pilots spend quite a bit (but not all) of their stick time in the front seat learning how to become an effective Copilot-Gunner at their line unit. They also fly the aircraft from that seat on a regular basis. If you prove to be substandard in either role, expect to fly less and progress more slowly than your peers.

 

Our job is to find, fix, and destroy the enemy, with a major focus on doing everything within our power to ensure that our brothers and sisters on the ground survive to redeploy and hug their families. Cross-country flights certainly happen from time to time, but being interested in the particulars of aviation meal-hopping before you're an Aviator that your unit can rely on without question to successfully execute a combat mission on a moonless night in mountainous terrain with a high threat density won't serve your career interests very well.

 

~V


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#3 Luofynerd

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 01:48

Don't treat your crewchief like crap. I agree with Vaelor, I feel like food hopping would be the least of my worries.

#4 ByteFlighter

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 02:31

Man, and here I thought, all it took to be a great Army pilot was getting a rib cage tattoo titled "Fire Bird", combing the Nav Charts for mediocre FBO food stops and occasionally yelling "I AM THE GREATEST!!!"

 

Thanks for clearing that up.

~Ace



#5 Trogdor

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 08:10

I will echo Vaelor. Your focus needs to be on managing the sensor and the weapons and all the mission stuff in the front seat when you show up to the unit.

To answer the cyclic question since you will be doing the vast majority of your flying in the front when you show up, generally the cyclic is collapsed to get in and out of the cockpit. Unless your body or kit interferes with it it should be up at all times when you are flying. That way you can always take the controls if something happens to the back seater.
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#6 ByteFlighter

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 16:05

I will echo Vaelor. Your focus needs to be on managing the sensor and the weapons and all the mission stuff in the front seat when you show up to the unit.

To answer the cyclic question since you will be doing the vast majority of your flying in the front when you show up, generally the cyclic is collapsed to get in and out of the cockpit. Unless your body or kit interferes with it it should be up at all times when you are flying. That way you can always take the controls if something happens to the back seater.

 

 

Yeah roger that. I'm just looking for an in depth idea when it comes to choosing the 64 over other air frames. The 64 is rather unique compared to the 72, 60 and 47 when it comes to the co-pilot. Just wanted to get a sense of the initial stuff the co-pilot is responsible for.

 

Thanks for the feedback



#7 Drew

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 22:23

A side note no one thinks about, if you have a shy kidney/bladder you can take a leak in a Gatorade bottle in the privacy of your own cockpit.
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#8 Hambone73

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 23:42

A side note no one thinks about, if you have a shy kidney/bladder you can take a leak in a Gatorade bottle in the privacy of your own cockpit.


No relief tubes in a 64? Our Huey's and cobras have piss tubes.

#9 StockTrader

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Posted 02 September 2017 - 13:02

 
 
Yeah roger that. I'm just looking for an in depth idea when it comes to choosing the 64 over other air frames. The 64 is rather unique compared to the 72, 60 and 47 when it comes to the co-pilot. Just wanted to get a sense of the initial stuff the co-pilot is responsible for.
 
Thanks for the feedback


Some of it will be unit dependent if they progress you dual seat or front seat only. But most of your time will be front seat for a while.

#10 movingtarget21

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 01:45

Current dATM requires all AH-64 Aircrew to be designated dual seat.  You will be progressed in both seats but will initially spend a majority of your hours in the front seat to learn the systems and how to manage them.   This has more to do with understanding how employ the aircraft weapons system than strictly flying proficiency.  

 

The amount you will actually be on the flight controls in the front seat is dependent on the mission and the PIC.  I let my front seater fly as much as the mission and situation allows.


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