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Crash kills pilot and Troy Gentry


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#21 r22butters

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 14:18

I don't know, in a Jet Ranger (that glides like,...forever) yeah, maybe? A 269 however, that makes a 22's glide look long!

I guess if you must, decend to a hover, shut the fuel valve off, then wait for the hover auto?
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#22 Hand_Grenade_Pilot

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 14:33

I don't know, in a Jet Ranger (that glides like,...forever) yeah, maybe? A 269 however, that makes a 22's glide look long!
I guess if you must, decend to a hover, shut the fuel valve off, then wait for the hover auto?


The length of the glide is irrelevant in this scenario. You're not trying to make a specific spot; anywhere on the runway will suffice. No need to do anything fancy to adjust the glide path.

And getting it to a stable hover with a fixed throttle setting (without overspeeding) is a long shot to say the least. More then likely, you will be performing an autorotation from altitude (if the pilot is comfortable doing so).

If the pilot has any doubt that the autorotation could be performed safely, then they should perform a power on approach, land immediately and have the necessary overspeed inspections done.
Aviation is a cruel mistress. When she's not taking your money, she's coming up with creative ways to kill you.

#23 Hand_Grenade_Pilot

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 14:40

And while the H269 (or Schweitzer 300 if you'd prefer) does drop like a brick in an autorotation (as do all helicopters with more than two blades) I found it to be much easier to manage then the R22. The rotor system has a little more inertia, making RPM fluctuations less dramatic. The landing gear is also more robust and can handle harder ground contact.
Aviation is a cruel mistress. When she's not taking your money, she's coming up with creative ways to kill you.

#24 r22butters

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 14:55

And getting it to a stable hover with a fixed throttle setting (without overspeeding) is a long shot to say the least. More then likely, you will be performing an autorotation from altitude (if the pilot is comfortable doing so).

Well in that case, I'm back to my original plan, f*ck the aircraft, let it overspeed!
The only dream I have left is to live long enough to see the pilot shortage. Its been about fifteen years since they first told me it was coming, so,...

Aaaaaaaany day now! :D

#25 r22butters

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 16:56

https://www.ntsb.gov...908X43517&key=1
The only dream I have left is to live long enough to see the pilot shortage. Its been about fifteen years since they first told me it was coming, so,...

Aaaaaaaany day now! :D

#26 Wally

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 07:25

Overspeed???  If there's ANY doubt about survival without damaging the helicopter- then put down in bits and shards in as survivable situation as possible as long as you and your passenger walk away.

Sully is justifiably famous for his exceptional, outstanding judgement and superb skill, deservedly so.  That airplane wasn't unscathed but everybody walked away because he went for maximum chance of survival instead of trying the much riskier perfection offered by returns to airports.

The aircraft is threatening your life because it is broken.  Waste it if you have to, but SURVIVE!  Overspeed that bee-yach(t) but walk away.


  • 500E and adam32 like this

Just a pilot (retired, so I have a LOT of time)...


#27 iChris

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 12:10

It appears at this point, this will go down with that old story line:

 

Examination of the rotor blades revealed evidence of low rotor energy at impact. Loss of engine RPM control for undetermined reasons, and the pilot's failure to maintain main rotor rpm during the subsequent autorotation. A factor in the accident was the unsuitable nature of the terrain for a forced landing.

 

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According to the chief flight instructor for the operator, the purpose of the flight was to provide an orientation/pleasure flight to the passenger who was scheduled to perform in a concert on the airport later that evening.

 

Several minutes after takeoff, the pilot reported over the airport UNICOM frequency that he was unable to control engine rpm with throttle inputs. He reported he could "roll" the twist-grip, but that there was no corresponding change in engine rpm when he did so.

The company flight instructor and another certificated helicopter flight instructor were monitoring the frequency and engaged the pilot in conversation about potential courses of action to affect the subsequent landing. Options discussed included a shallow approach to a run-on landing, or a power-off, autorotational descent to landing. The pilot elected to stop the engine and perform an autorotation, which was a familiar procedure he had performed numerous times in the past. Prior to entering the autorotation, the pilot was advised to initiate the maneuver over the runway.


The company flight instructor reported that the helicopter entered the autorotation about 950 ft. above ground level, and that the helicopter was quiet during its descent "because the engine was off." During the descent, the rotor rpm decayed to the point where the instructor could see the individual rotor blades. The helicopter descended from view prior to reaching the runway threshold and the sounds of impact were heard. Both instructors reported that a high-pitched "whine" could be heard from the helicopter during the latter portion of the descent.


A video forwarded by local police showed the helicopter south of the runway as it entered what appeared to be a descent profile consistent with an autorotation. Toward the end of the video, the descent profile became more vertical and the rate of descent increased before the helicopter descended out of view. No sound could be heard from the helicopter.

 

Excerpts of the pilot's logbook revealed he had logged 480.9 total hours of flight experience. It was estimated that he had accrued over 300 total hours of flight experience in the accident helicopter make and model. The last entry logged was for 1.2 hours in the accident helicopter on the day of the accident.

 

Each of the three blades was bent significantly at its respective blade root. The blades showed little to no damage along their respective spans toward the blade tips, which was consistent with low rotor rpm at ground contact.

 

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA317


Edited by iChris, 21 September 2017 - 12:31.

Regards,

Chris




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