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Too Short for WOFT


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#1 Charlien24

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Posted 16 March 2018 - 21:30

Hello,

 

My name is Charlie Nguyen and I have been considering an application for WOFT for quite some time now. I was reading the basic requirements to be considered and one of the listed requirements is a height of 64 inches. Now i'm pretty short standing at about 5'3 and a half. Is this at all waiverable or am I just screwed? Thanks for any information at all.

 

Sincerely,

Charlie

 

 



#2 Creep0321

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 02:01

Lindsey?

Look into the Aeromedical Policy Letters (APL). Google will show you. I dont have a specific answer for you now but Ill try to look into it.

Swift, Silent, Deadly.


#3 Creep0321

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 02:06

http://glwach.amedd....s_28may2014.pdf

PDF page 165
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Swift, Silent, Deadly.


#4 rbussma

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 10:18

If you are out of standard for any anthropometric measurements you can get an exception to policy if you are able to pass an in-cockpit evaluation. I had to get one for being on the tall side, but there was also another guy there getting one for being too short. I'm a little unsure about the process to request one as a civilian, but as long as you can manipulate the flight controls, you should be good to go.


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#5 Charlien24

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 11:43

Wow, I am always so impressed with the willingness to help on this forum. Thank you guys so much, I have looked through section on Anthropometry and i'm sure I will be able to meet the three measurement conditions. I am so excited even though I won't be submitting my packet until sometime next year.



#6 Lindsey

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Posted 17 March 2018 - 16:10

If you are out of standard for any anthropometric measurements you can get an exception to policy if you are able to pass an in-cockpit evaluation. I had to get one for being on the tall side, but there was also another guy there getting one for being too short. I'm a little unsure about the process to request one as a civilian, but as long as you can manipulate the flight controls, you should be good to go.


This. Waiverable with an exception to policy. You will have to do the in cockpit evaluation and prove you can reach everything thats important (not just controls). Thats if you fail any of those measurements.
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#7 Charlien24

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 01:31

So I have just conducted the three anthropometric measurements described in the Aeromedical Policy Letters. Though I passed the Total Arm Reach (167.75cm), and the Sitting Height (I am definitely under this) I am unfortunately well underneath the requirement for crotch height (68.58cm) with the requirement being > 75cm. (Guess I've got some short legs :() . I know this means that I am definitely going to have to try and waiver this with an exception to policy. I have read some of the data collected in the USAARL Report No. 84-11, and in the document the shortest crotch height was around 69cm and the subject was able to reach the pedals in the UH-60, and CH-47 which were the only two helicopters in the study that are currently in use to my knowledge. (The study was conducted in 1984) I was wondering if anyone else has had this issue and could give any information as to how the cockpit evaluation is actually conducted, and if specific airframe restriction could hurt my application. 



#8 rbussma

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Posted 21 March 2018 - 09:12

So I have just conducted the three anthropometric measurements described in the Aeromedical Policy Letters. Though I passed the Total Arm Reach (167.75cm), and the Sitting Height (I am definitely under this) I am unfortunately well underneath the requirement for crotch height (68.58cm) with the requirement being > 75cm. (Guess I've got some short legs :() . I know this means that I am definitely going to have to try and waiver this with an exception to policy. I have read some of the data collected in the USAARL Report No. 84-11, and in the document the shortest crotch height was around 69cm and the subject was able to reach the pedals in the UH-60, and CH-47 which were the only two helicopters in the study that are currently in use to my knowledge. (The study was conducted in 1984) I was wondering if anyone else has had this issue and could give any information as to how the cockpit evaluation is actually conducted, and if specific airframe restriction could hurt my application. 

 

When I had mine conducted, my unit's flight surgeon (I'm Guard) coordinated everything for me and I came down to Fort Rucker on a Thursday night. First thing Friday morning, I met a CW4 who essentially chauffeured us to all the airfields around Fort Rucker. At each airfield, he along with an IP would sit there as we got in the cockpit, manipulated all of the flight controls, and basically proved we could reach across the cockpit. Once we had repeated this with every airframe (minus C-12s), he took us back to his office where he typed up a memo stating each airframe and as to whether or not we "passed". This memo essentially serves as a recommendation to aeromed as to whether or not to grant an exception to policy. I was all done and on my way home by about 10am. This was several years ago, so the process may have changed slightly.

 

As long as you pass the evaluation for the UH-72 and one of the deployable airframes, you should be able to get an ETP. If there are any airframes you don't "pass" the evaluation in, your waiver will simply state "WO1 Smith can not fly such and such airframe".






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