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Flight 1 physical and PRK concern

eyes prk flight

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#1 himselfagain

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 00:16

Can anyone clarify the procedure to get a waiver for the flight 1 physical if the prk was done over 8 years ago? The ophthalmologist's clinic moved or closed but it is not where I had it. My vision is stable and is 20/40 non-corrected and the prk was only performed on my right eye. Also have no issues with astigmatism. 



#2 iChris

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 11:35

Can anyone clarify the procedure to get a waiver for the flight 1 physical if the prk was done over 8 years ago? The ophthalmologist's clinic moved or closed but it is not where I had it. My vision is stable and is 20/40 non-corrected and the prk was only performed on my right eye. Also have no issues with astigmatism. 

 

Refractive Procedures. The FAA accepts the following Food and Drug Administration approved refractive procedures for visual acuity correction: 

 

Radial Keratotomy (RK) 

Epikeratophakia 

Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis (LASIK), including Wavefront-guided LASIK 

Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) 

Conductive Keratoplasty (CK) 

 

An applicant treated with a refractive procedure may be issued a medical certificate by the Examiner if the applicant meets the visual acuity standards and the Report of Eye Evaluation (FAA Form 8500-7) indicates that healing is complete; visual acuity remains stable; and the applicant does not suffer sequela such as; glare intolerance, halos, rings, impaired night vision, or any other complications. There should be no other pathology of the affected eye(s). 

 

If the procedure was done 2 years ago or longer, the FAA may accept the Examiner's eye evaluation and an airman statement regarding the absence of adverse sequela. 

 

If the procedure was performed within the last 2 years, the airman must provide a report to the AMCD from the treating health care professional to document the date of procedure, any adverse effects or complications, and when the airman returned to flying duties. If the report is favorable and the airman meets the appropriate vision standards, the applicant may resume airman duties, unless informed otherwise by the FAA.

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Check out the 2019 GUIDE FOR AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINERS . Eye items start on page 52. Next step, contact your examiner.


Edited by iChris, 09 May 2019 - 11:53.

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Regards,

Chris

#3 himselfagain

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 03:31

Thanks Chris. Sorry I didn't clarify, but I was referring to the Flight I physical for Army Aviation.



#4 Eric Hunt

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 05:13

...and the PRK referred to the People's Republic of Korea....






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