Jump to content


Frasca VRForum468VOLO_VRHome200Helicopter AcademyTigerTugs
- - - - -

Helo-Stories


  • Please log in to reply
28 replies to this topic

#21 Guest_Saw Pilot_*

Guest_Saw Pilot_*
  • Guests

Posted 19 December 2003 - 08:59

Not a movie worthy incident, but hopefully a "young aviator"
can learn something from it.
I was spraying a river on the east coast for Blackfly. The application method was spray accross the river being sure to cover one shore line to the other. I had been flying for about six hours that day and was on my last load before returning to the shop. (any guesses about what happened yet?)
At this point I had been spraying for about three years and I knew all there was to know about it, so when I found the next spray site I just set up to spray it. About three quarters across the river, I saw the wire about half a second before it hit the bubble. What really surprised me next was that everything went into slowmotion, and I was able to think of all the scenarios and what would be the best thing to do.
My thoughts were of the wire rapping around the mast (Very
bad thought), so I pushed forward hoping to cut the wire with a M/R blade. (It was too late to do anything, but it was a nice thought) So I set up for a gravell bar that was right in front of me, waiting for the helicopter to come apart somehow. After all the noise of wires in the rotor stopped, and the skids had just touched the ground, I realized that I was still flying, and didn't have any vibrations either!  Being the smart and cautious pilot that I became in the last few seconds, I shut down to look for damage.
Turns out that One blade went over the wire and the next one went under, causing the wire to get wrapped in the strong part of the head which broke it. The marks on the stabilizer bar showed that as the wire separated, one end of it wrapped around the bar a least four times and unwrapped before it actually damaged the bar! After changing shorts, the call to the office for recovery and the aftermath is aother story.
The moral of the story:
  There is a genetic flaw in helicopter pilots that causes them to not be able to learn until they do it too. I had been working with a lot of experienced spray pilots and most of them had hit wires in the past. For some reason I thought it woudn't happen to me.
  I don't want to preach, but the best thing a pilot can do is talk to others share stories and maybe something will sink in.
  However, I still haven't learned, now I work next to the power lines for a living.
  Hope I haven't been too windy.
Thanks for reading.


#22 yzchopper

yzchopper

    VR Veteran Poster

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 324 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Basin City, Washington
  • Interests:Motocross racing, R/C helicopter flying, and flying full scale helicopters

Posted 16 January 2004 - 11:36

Not as exciting as others I've heard but here is some I think are worth mentioning. When flying in class G you are not required to make radio calls but it is a great safety practice to do so, But if you make a call you must know where your at. On Sept. 28th 2003 I was with my instructor flying back from Boise Idaho to Caldwell, Idaho, just following I-84 westbound,  I made a radio call I was 5 miles east at 3000 over I-84 when I got close to Nampa I made another call I was 1/2 mile to the north at 3000 west bound for caldwell. I heard an airplane pilot call he was on final for 1 1 Nampa. I looked all over and did not see this pilot. I radioed to him and he stated he was on final at 3000. I looked again and there he was on a 45 to intercep a long final and headed right for me. I lowered the collective pushed over on the cyclic (gently) and got the hell out of there. He never even seen me even after I stated my position and he continued on with his landing. If I was not looking he would have been right on top of me in about 5 seconds. I stayed cool and calm, my instructor was a little shaky though. Another incident happened to me on Jan. 3rd 2004 when coming back from doing radio work solo at Boise. I made my radio call I was 2 miles out on long final for taxiway parallel 30.Looking for traffic, none in the air that I could see, I made a radio call on short final for taxiway parallel 30 moved a little to the right set up my approach a little better and then holy sh*t I had a airplane that just took off from 12 and was making a right turn same altitude as me and headed right for me. I lowered the collective and made a rapid decent. He saw me at the same time and pulled up and to the left. After contacting the pilot of the plane we both made the assumption we had just talked over each other on the radio. I just wanted to say wait a split second before you talk to avoid talking over somebody because if you don't hear them you may not see them either and the consequences can be deadly. Just my two cents worth.  :cheers:  rotorheadsmiley
Fly safe rotorheadsmiley

 Steve

People Fly Airplanes, PILOTS Fly Helicopters

#23 matador

matador

    CFI Poster

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 45 posts
  • Location:in the cockpit

Posted 18 January 2004 - 03:06

Well, in some other thread I wrote how I went through wires this summer during fire fighting, but today I would like to tell a little story that happened to me yesterday.
We went to a mountain rescue and was landed while waiting for the rescuers and the injured to get to the helicopter. OK. it was windy and when we got to the mountain it got quite bad, but you know.... you always think that you can handle it flying with extrem care. The thing is that all of a sudden the helicopter slided more than 40º heading to the right. Have to say that the surface was not ice or snow, it was dirt and stones all around the cabin, lucky enough that the tail was clear of stones :down:
Learning: Anytime you can have something you didn't count on :(  so think the worst condition and be prepared for it.Buen vuelo

Take care of yourself at least once a day

#24 lynxpilot

lynxpilot

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Location:Yuma, AZ

Posted 14 March 2004 - 21:55

Flying during a major multi-national exercise in and around Norway.  As required, our crew (pilot[me], flight commander [observer], and observer trainee) obtained the safety brief from the Norwegian Air Force which was essentially to stay away from power lines crossing the fjords and don't overfly mink farms.  We were at the tail end of a search and destroy to find 'enemy' patrol boats hidden in the fjords.  To this point, we were fairly comfy with navigating around and using the updated chart that showed where the evil power lines crossed the water.  My duties were essentially to fly and the observer's were to navigate, communicate, and operate the radar and weapons systems.  Observer trainee had done very well for the entire flight and we confirmed wire crossings as we approached the charted positions every time.  It was dusk and we were just about to wrap it up and go back to the ship, so I turned on the spot and aimed it forward until we cleared the fjords.  Most of the wires crossed very high so it was actually safer to stay low (about 200' or so), but all of the sudden I hear the 'DESCEND!' call, I dump collective and hug the water, and we go under a set of about 3 wires that feeds a little settlement inside one of the fjords.  Most of these lines are big, and even if we'd been equipped with a cutter, I still think we would have been toast.  Norwegians had just lost an F-16/pilot who was flying in the fjords and kissed the wires.  Obviously we were lucky (certainly not smart) and I gained a further respect for power lines.  As I prepare to retire and fly EMS, I'll certainly be needing that respect.

#25 Stoodent Pilot

Stoodent Pilot

    Student Poster

  • VIP Member
  • PipPip
  • 14 posts
  • Location:Las Vegas

Posted 27 April 2004 - 18:45

Awesome experience today. Went solo through Class B to Henderson from North Las Vegas. After done at Henderson, I was vectored thru Class B to a midfield crossing at 2700 at McCarran then crossing over the Strip at 2700 too. It was sooo cool. I love flying helos!!! Wish I had a camera!
"I dunno, suppose you can speed it up a little...."

#26 canguy21

canguy21

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 21 February 2005 - 14:11

I was on the ramp  as the 205 was lifting off for some longline training. I glanced over and frantically signalled the pilot to land. He hovered while conferring with the student then set down. The longline was hooked to a drum of cement and  looped over the skid. Would have really ruined their day.

#27 AV8

AV8

    COM Poster

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 36 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern California

Posted 20 May 2006 - 04:48

<font color='#000000'>******Vultures strike again*********

Not mine but one of my old instructors working at Ft. Rucker passed this along, happened quite recently.  

Needed notes...At Rucker they fly with one IP in the left seat, one student in the right seat, and one student behind the instructor to learn through osmosis.

The group in the 206 happened to run upon a Turkey vulture, the vulture impacted the instructor side windscreen and broke through hitting the instructor in his helmet visor which shattered and knocked the IP unconcious.  The instructor then fell over on the students cyclic, and having his hand on the throttle like a good instructor, rolled the throttle off to the idle stop position.  Starting an extremely nose down and right roll the student in the back unbuckled his seat belt and reached forward and pulled the instructor off the cyclic while the other student regained control and made a safe landing.  Damage---IP side windscreen and vulture blood in the cockpit (the vulture actually ripped in half with half stuck in the visor and half under the students pedals)  the IP got away with a broken jaw, broken sinus cavities, and hella amounts of pain.  Dr said helmet visor saved his life.  When the students were interviewed they said they did a complete 360 roll before control was regained but no one knows if this is true.</font>



<font color='#000000'>******Vultures strike again*********

Not mine but one of my old instructors working at Ft. Rucker passed this along, happened quite recently.  

Needed notes...At Rucker they fly with one IP in the left seat, one student in the right seat, and one student behind the instructor to learn through osmosis.

The group in the 206 happened to run upon a Turkey vulture, the vulture impacted the instructor side windscreen and broke through hitting the instructor in his helmet visor which shattered and knocked the IP unconcious.  The instructor then fell over on the students cyclic, and having his hand on the throttle like a good instructor, rolled the throttle off to the idle stop position.  Starting an extremely nose down and right roll the student in the back unbuckled his seat belt and reached forward and pulled the instructor off the cyclic while the other student regained control and made a safe landing.  Damage---IP side windscreen and vulture blood in the cockpit (the vulture actually ripped in half with half stuck in the visor and half under the students pedals)  the IP got away with a broken jaw, broken sinus cavities, and hella amounts of pain.  Dr said helmet visor saved his life.  When the students were interviewed they said they did a complete 360 roll before control was regained but no one knows if this is true.</font>





Yes , I met this instructor, he was an IP in my primary class just last year at Ft. rucker, he still teaches. Are you a army aviator? Where are you stationed?

#28 delorean

delorean

    VR Veteran Poster

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 693 posts
  • Location:Missouri

Posted 20 May 2006 - 09:59

Here's one that happened to me....I submitted this text to ADHeliProps a few years ago.

------------------

I was prepared to solo a student for the second time in a brand new R22BII. We departed our ramp toward the airport’s helicopter practice area. Upon entering the right crosswind, the tower instructed us to make this first landing a full stop rather than our normal “cleared for the option.” While lecturing my student, I overheard the tower say something about an over flight and a “break”. I listened for the reply, but didn’t hear anything (I now realize they were on UHF.) We turned right base while descending to 400 AGL and were about to turn final when I noticed an F/A-18 Hornet at the same altitude over the south parallel runway doing at least 200kts. I enthusiastically said, “Hey, check that out!” Less than a second later—abeam our position—he started a fast right break and came at us. I slammed the collective down and entered a right 180 degree autorotation to get under him. It appeared that he tightened up his turn to avoid us as well. We were less than a 1/4 mile apart. Had we both not taken corrective action, a collision, or jet blast could taken us out of the sky.

-------------------

Scary stuff. After that, the tower always had EVERYONE on the ground anytime a fighter jet was coming in for landing. Oh, my student still wanted to solo that day.....That was a good thing since I really wanted to get out of that helicopter.

#29 Francis Meyrick

Francis Meyrick

    VR Veteran Poster

  • VR Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 292 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:TEXAS, USA !!
  • Interests:Fixed Wing and Helo trucker. I enjoy being a chopper jockey, and trying to figure the world, people and belief systems out. I'm not very good at it, so it keeps me real busy. I scribble, blog, run a website, (www.writersharbor.org) run rental houses, ride motorbikes, and read as much as I can. I went solo 44 years ago, and I like to say I'm gonna get me a real job one day. When I grow up. ("but not just yet, Lord, not just yet")
    For my aviation scribbles see www.chopperstories.com.... enjoy!

Posted 15 February 2014 - 12:19

I have never, ever, done stupid stuff. That's why I sit in management, as a check Airman, pronouncing stern judgment on all those incompetent lunatics below me. I am the Immaculate Conception. I don't smile much, and I have no sense of humor. Woe betide you, young feller!

 

Right?

 

(Yeah, right.)  (motherF$@#!!R)

 

Okay, I might have messed up at least once in forty years.

 

here's the story:    A Big Whoops...

 

 

:unsure:


"Flying is a Privilege, and not a Right"

 

 

fa9f27a0-98d0-48ed-9687-6953eb7f9fca_zps





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users



MaunaLoaVRHome200Genesys VR Forum 200PrecisionVRForumHome200Spectrum_VRHome200HeliHelmets-VR HomeNFCVRForum200Home