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Army pilot stereotypes


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#1 IWannaFly

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 21:27

This is kindof a silly question. I know in some flight communities pilots of one type of aircraft are viewed differently than others. Is the same true for Army aviation? What stereotypes are out there for pilots of different types of Army aircraft? I haven't heard any is why I'm wondering. Just curious.

Edited by IWannaFly, 11 February 2008 - 21:29.


#2 FLHooker

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Posted 11 February 2008 - 21:48

Yes, yes there are... instead of possibly upsetting others in other airframes I will just talk about hookers (Chinook pilots)


Typically laid back, fun loving people.



CHAD
Full right pedal, stare at the OAT gauge until impact...

#3 Wally

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 10:06

This is kindof a silly question. I know in some flight communities pilots of one type of aircraft are viewed differently than others. Is the same true for Army aviation? What stereotypes are out there for pilots of different types of Army aircraft? I haven't heard any is why I'm wondering. Just curious.


Hookers = bus drivers, skilled bus drivers, but bus drivers nonetheless.
The difference between a Hoover and a gunship? A Hoover only has one dirt bag in it. And, contrary to what gunship pilots believe- you can't solve ALL your problems in life with a pair of rockets. You CAN silence almost all your problems in life with a WELL AIMED pair of rockets, however.
Blackhawk drivers never solo.
Scouts go looking for trouble. From the burning scout, adjust your fire... A death wish isn't required for scouts, but it is helpful.
It's not polite, or smart, to speak ill of medevac pilots. There, but for the grace of God, go you...

Army aviators are all arrogant prima donna punk-ass kids. They're not real soldiers at all. The legs, cannon cockers, etc., all of'em hate, fear, envy and mistrust what they don't understand- aviation. Until the rounds start popping through the brush, or the T-whatevers are coming across the line, or you drop into the LZ with hot chow or a ride home...

Just a pilot (retired, so I have a LOT of time)...


#4 Linc

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 20:58

Fair enough. :)

Linc

For this gull, though, it was not eating that mattered, but flight. More than anything else. Jonathan Livingston Seagull loved to fly.


#5 permison

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 16:23

Fair enough. :)


Heh...do they still give that speech in scout training about the study that looked at the survival time of different MOS's time in contact with the enemy and scouts having the shortest at 3 seconds?
It's a great day for an adventure!

#6 palmfish

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Posted 13 February 2008 - 21:43

Heh...do they still give that speech in scout training about the study that looked at the survival time of different MOS's time in contact with the enemy and scouts having the shortest at 3 seconds?


Hey, I remember that one - although we were given 16 seconds back in 1988. :rolleyes:

#7 permison

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Posted 14 February 2008 - 09:22

Hey, I remember that one - although we were given 16 seconds back in 1988. :rolleyes:



:lol: Scouts Out!
It's a great day for an adventure!

#8 Crusty Old Dude

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Posted 17 March 2008 - 13:47

Heh...do they still give that speech in scout training about the study that looked at the survival time of different MOS's time in contact with the enemy and scouts having the shortest at 3 seconds?

They said the same thing to the 13-F's that I went through Sill with back in the day (1988 to be precise).

;-)

13-F = artillery forward observer

#9 daniel.clarke750

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Posted 22 April 2008 - 22:29

I know that saying... (Scouts Out) although it is slighty different meaning to me... Cavary Scout - 19D here.
The man who smiles when things go wrong has thought of someone to blame it on - Robert Bloch

Illegitimi Non Carborundum




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