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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/28/2021 in all areas

  1. Cannot wait for next week, the wait really is exhausting. Does anyone know when the MILPER populates? I know it is usually the ~Wednesday following the board but is it issued the Monday after and posted that Wednesday?
    2 points
  2. The board is finally here, now another 2ish weeks to find out the results. Good luck everyone! AGE: 31 RANK: SGT(P)/ 5 Years TIS ASVAB GT: 112 SIFT: 45 APFT: 270 EDUCATION: 29 Credits, 3.85 GPA FLIGHT: No Hours BOARD: July 2021 LOR: CW3 (OIC), O-3 (CO CDR), O-5 (BN CDR), CW4 (AV), CW5 (AV), O-6 (AV) PHYSICAL: Stamped
    2 points
  3. This would mean part of the purchase cost would be paid on 1) day one of acquisition, 2) part at end of year one after acquisition and 3) part at end of year two. The two deferred payments to possibly vary against an agreed metric such as EBITDA remaining at level of day one. This makes sure the seller isn't handing you a "dud"
    2 points
  4. If you are in the USA stick with your heli job and get yourself as close to ATP mins as you can. Look it up in part 61 and do your best to get that flight time. There’s a strong possibility the regional airlines will start back up the rotor transitions and you can apply and get them to help with your training costs, and get your foot in the door to the fixed wing world.
    2 points
  5. Lots of air into the cockpit, like having no windshield on the freeway but worse. One person can fly. Why is it about to crash? That’s going to determine how “gently” it goes into the sea. But for drama’s sake you can assume it’s going to be pretty violent. If the blades contact the water the impact forces will essentially rip the aircraft apart. This isn’t a Sea King but the video captures both scenarios. The first being a relatively controlled landing after an engine failure (still pretty hard landing, eh?), and the second is a blade strike: Note that the helicopter rolls over and starts to sink. Almost guaranteed to happen in a bad water crash. The pilot will not have a lot of time to get out of the aircraft, seconds.
    2 points
  6. Welcome back…… I run the Gallet LH250. My organization issued me the SPH-5 but I only wear it to remind myself how good the Gallet is…. I have quiet kit, CEP’s (molded earpieces), Zita liner, straight chord, NVG mount which was purchased from Marit Apparel…. Helmets seem to be a matter of; #1, cost, and #2, loyalty… Kinda-like the Ford/Chevy thing…. I tend to stick with the tried-and-true stuff. Stuff that has been worn in the field over a long period of time. The majority of pilots in my sector go with the Gallet… Comfort, lightweight and a narrow CG are the most common compliments. Most of them tell me; the other “newer” brands are “knock-offs” of established models. I’m not sure why anyone would gamble with knock-offs for head protection (not to say in this particular case the “other” helmets mentioned are in fact “knock-offs”). In motorcycle racing, the saying goes; if you believe your head is worth $150, then get a $150 helmet. The helmet I eventually purchased was $600-ish which wasn’t the highest price but was considered one of the top helmets for head protection... The LH350 looks interesting but since I haven’t been in the market for a new helmet, I don’t know much about it. From the info I’ve seen, it appears to be an upgraded LH250, although an “A” model which brings me back to the tried-and-true philosophy…..
    1 point
  7. Howdy. I am a S2S candidate and the wait is making me go crazy. I know we don't get put in the MILPER message with in service candidates. Would other previously selected S2S mind sharing how and when they heard they were selected? I've heard this coming board they will look at S2S packets Monday-Tuesday and Wed-Friday will be for in service... would we have a chance to know by Wednesday, would it show in the recruiters system before they proceed with in service? Any idea how this works? Or should I just go forget about the world until about August 2nd? Any light on this would be very appreciated! Thanks everyone! And good luck to all submitted for July!
    1 point
  8. The next helmet on my list to buy will be a Paraclete Aspida. They are so light weight it’s kind of ridiculous… a friend with one only really griped about how the earcups attach to the helmet (similar to an HGU but not much Velcro contact area). Other than that, they look well built, same low profile as an SPH, and once again… light as a feather. Scott, the fella who started Paraclete, is a former Night Stalker that designed the helmet to truly allow goggles without a weight bag, and fixed just about every issue with Gentex/Gallet/Alpha/Evo when he designed his. Just gotta get a winning scratcher and the order is going in…
    1 point
  9. As someone who is in, and was also selected; GT score unimportant. You over 110, you're good, SIFT score you can't do anything about, but 48 is fine. People have been selected with worse. Pray. My stats were wild the first time and I didn't get picked, second time around (like next month after) bam, was picked. Its just random AF.
    1 point
  10. Super nervous due to lower sift score and GT
    1 point
  11. Age :23 service: AD SGT 4.5 years TIS GT:111 SIFT:48 Flight: none APFT: 264 Education: 50 credits towards associates physical: 1W stamped no waivers LOR: O3 CO , O5 BN CO, CW5 CCWO, LTG CG waivers: Moral, approved
    1 point
  12. Even if a smallish deal, I'd have financial, technical and legal DD done by a third party. I'd structure with a deferred comp payout to vendor of at least 2yrs on agreed parameters - possibly three tranches. Lastly, this is not a growth business, so don't pay any more than 3-5 times EBITDA maximum.
    1 point
  13. AGE : 32 SERVICE : AD, 18C, SFC- 12.5 yrs TIS GT: 125 SIFT: 70 Flight: None APFT: 300 EDUCATION : Associates, 4.0 GPA PHYSICAL : No waivers LOR : O-4, O-5, CW-4 WAIVERS : AFS
    1 point
  14. I agree. I havent heard much about this board either. Here to hopping that this is a small board with a bigger number of seats to fill.
    1 point
  15. Don’t know the class number yet but my son’s start date for WOCS is 6OCT2021…he ships out for Basic Training tomorrow morning.
    1 point
  16. Hey man, the Pa Wraiths love is for everybody.
    1 point
  17. Plenty of people make money in aviation. It sounds like you have what could be considered a half way reliable customer base and already have the certificates. Have you asked to look at the books? I wouldn't do much until then. One thing I have noticed, just about every small operator I know is an A&P mechanic as well as a pilot. Being able to keep the aircraft available and safe is key. Good luck.
    1 point
  18. SGT(P) 5 YEARS ACTIVE DUTY AGE: 31 ASVAB GT: 112 SIFT: 45 APFT: 270 EDUCATION: 29 Credits - 3.67 GPA FLIGHT: NO HOURS BOARD: JULY 2021 LOR: CW3, CW4, CW5, O-3, O-5, O-6 PHYSICAL: Stamped
    1 point
  19. Here is what I was sent from recruiting when I tried to submit a my packet with an ACFT score. I have an APFT on file from before the October 2020 deadline. "- DA 61 BLK 41 ACFT NOT VALID (IAW AD 2020-06 APFT IS VALID UNTIL 31 MAR 2022, BLK 41 MUST HAVE LAST STANDARD 3 EVENT APFT TAKEN PRIOR TO 1 OCT 2020, ACFT NOT AUTHORIZED FOR APPLICATION PURPOSES)" So you use your APFT score from August 2020.
    1 point
  20. The USN SH-3 (American version of the Sea King) had a low rotor RPM warning as well as some engine function warnings. For the most part a pilot in distress will send out some form of a May Day call. Hit the rule of thumb in an emergency is “aviate, navigate, and communicate.” In your book you might want to give the injured pilot a little more time to live. The pilot seat of a Sea King is on the right and is covered from the rear by a bulkhead with a coms console to the left. Getting a dead guy out of there is not impossible, but it would be quite difficult in a pinch. Also, a pilot getting killed in the seat is likely to yank about a bit on the controls making the time line from accident-to-hero-taking over amazingly short and critical. So, maybe, the pilot should call out something like, “Dave, get in here, I’m hurt and don’t know how much longer I can hold her.” Other things to consider…who is in the 2P seat (co-pilot in right seat)? Did our hero jump into that seat when he was rescued? The Sea King (in military configuration) is already a loud machine up front, with the windscreen gone it is only going to get louder…does our hero have a helmet or headset to put on? I also recommend having the rock strike the helicopter as rises parallel to the volcano so a rock could potentially hit the windscreen without hurting the rotors. To your other questions: You could fly an SH-3 with only one pilot but the workload would be interesting. To land the hero will need to clean up any issues with the flight parameters caused by the pilots death (essentially gain control of the helicopter) and then enter an autorotation to a water landing. Here is the procedure from NATOPS… *1. Speed selector(s) - FULL FORWARD. *2. Alert crew. *3. Harnesses - LOCKED. *4. Mayday/IFF. *5. External stores - JETTISON. 6. Execute single-engine approach profile. 7. Jettison windows during landing flare. 8. Land on top of swell - HEAD INTO WAVES, 0 TO 15 KNOTS GROUNDSPEED.
    1 point
  21. They vary. Usually there will be a warning light in red, high on the coaming, and a sound through the headset, often a repeated beep. If rotor RPM get low there is another light and a different sound, like the rising beep you hear from a car alarm. Newer aircraft might have a female voice telling you what the problem is - "bitching Betty".
    1 point
  22. Hmmm. A rock descending from above would more likely hit the rotor before the window. The rock would need to be horizontal to miss the rotor, but that sort of speed might not be possible from a volcano. A birdstrike, however, is a horizontal entry to a window, and in the past has incapacitated many aircrew. I only know of one case of a bird killing a pilot, it was an F-111 doing 450kt. A chopper would be doing maybe 125-150kt when hitting a bird.
    1 point
  23. The callsign is usually displayed on a label on the instrument panel - when we hop from one machine to another, it is easy to forget which one you are in. Why is your aircraft crashing? Don't worry about describing it, plenty of pilots are not as touchy as Hobie, and will give you some sensible advice. That video is interesting - the first water landing was from an engine failure in the hover, and the second engine only had enough power to cushion the water landing. After landing on the water, the pilot lowered the landing gear to make the cg lower down and give a bit of stability in the water. But nobody expected him to try a single-engine takeoff by moving forward to gain translational lift and fly away on one engine. Especially with the gear down - lots of drag, and low down, making the nose dip too far. Not sure why the pilot didn't stop the exercise when the nose first dipped, but he persisted and the machine was wrecked.
    1 point
  24. @chrismackery: I appreciate you wanting to write an accurate representation for your book. Please be sensitive that helicopter pilots jobs often require them to operate in very dangerous conditions, locations, situations. Not even mentioning military ops. Each pilot is well aware of an errant wind gust, distraction, mechanical failure, etc. can be a life ending experience. Many on this forum are highly seasoned pilots and like other risky jobs, tend to not want to talk to the public about when the, 'sh*t hits the fan'. They man up, accept the risk and do the job. That said, enormous amounts of time is spent training for every kind of in flight emergency and hopefully your book can portray these pilots in a positive light. As you are most likely aware, usually the more experienced pilots fly the larger aircraft and pilots always wear their seatbelts. The problem with a water landing is getting out of them fast enough and so the seatbelts incorporate special quick release features. Thank you for listening.
    1 point
  25. AD: SGT 4 years AD, 12 total - 8 reserve AGE: 30 GT: 120 SIFT: 61 APFT: 236 (Covid hold on tests) EDUCATION: 102 Credits FLIGHT: 0 hours LORS: Company CO, BN CO, CW4 MTP OTHER INFO: Eagle Scout PHYSICAL: Class 1W Stamped approved
    1 point
  26. Your stats are all good enough. No offense to earlier comments, but I wouldn't worry about GT improvement or comparing to street to seat. If for some reason you're not selected, it's probably just a numbers game or you have some kind of negative records you aren't mentioning. We also can't judge what you wrote in resume, or how much you churches up your duty positions, etc., but keep in mind if they're looking at a stack of applicants, what makes you special? Remedial PT instructor sounds pretty lame, compared to the rest of the things you listed. Plenty of ways to highlight your performance and duties in a way that makes you stand out. Platoon sergeant can be because there was nobody else around and you were just showing up to work collecting a paycheck, or it can be you were selected amongst your peers as a SSG, and accomplished XYZ, improving not only Platoon but the Company/BN, because XYZ. As humbly as you can, brag about your accomplishments. If you're a dumdum like me, write stuff out in word in dumdum talk, then start from the top and literally just right click and check synonyms for the words you used for that extra razzle dazzle. Good luck, you'll probably be fine.
    1 point
  27. I do. I have a Master's actually and my PPL. I want to join for the mission. Your question is irrelevant to the topic I presented though.
    1 point
  28. Joined this board March 2018 and finally made it to selection. 2 C12 (both to AD Warrants) 10 CH47 (mostly AD Warrants, only one guard and two or three RLOs I believe). 16 AH64 26 UH60 Pretty wild spread if you ask me.
    1 point
  29. Attitude is all this guys has. He dismisses every post and brags about flight time he probably doesn’t have. Best to ignore him.
    1 point
  30. Street to Seat AGE: 36 ASVAB GT: 126 SIFT: 68 EDUCATION: Grad School FLIGHT: 1800hrs, CFII ASEL BOARD: JULY 2021 LOR: Most of them are my instructors and colleagues, Marine O-5 (ret), Navy O-5 (ret), My chief Flight Instructor (civilian), My primary flight instructor who was also a 20 year Air Force veteran and USAR SOF O3 WAIVERS: AGE Good Luck y'all!
    1 point
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