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  1. Well I'll chime in with some MI fixed wing perspective. 1. Flight time. You live to deploy. You fly while deployed. The bulk of your hours usually come when you are deployed. When you're back home, you'll probably fly between 100% and 150% of your minimums. That equates to somewhere around 150 hours a year. Or like The Dude said, about 3 hours of flying a week. This need to deploy/high op tempo can stress a family out bad. Between all the TDY's, training exercises, gunnery, field work, and actual deployments, a lot of time is spent away from home. This obviously has a direct statistical corr
    12 points
  2. “Just as a Warrant Officer...” “even if it’s...” go fly somewhere else. If this is how you think of the Warrant Officer corps you’re intending to join and what you think of the job you’re applying for, then we don’t want you, and it sounds like you don’t want it either.
    11 points
  3. You the same dude as axesteel?
    9 points
  4. AxeSteel, your reaction to the selection results does not suggest a level of maturity that people look for in putting someone in charge of the lives of others, not to mention aircraft worth millions of dollars. An appropriate response would be to ask how you can better yourself to be selected next board or in the future. Complaining about the process/suggesting others do not make an effort on a public forum does not indicate professionalism. leadership, or any other quality that is indicative of future success as an officer or an aviator. This, like the posts of many of the previous folks who
    9 points
  5. We've been hitting the whole 10 year ADSO should you join thing pretty hard lately, and while there's some value in that, it's not relevant to those of you who have already started down this path. I enjoy writing and talking about myself so I'll share some stories about the days when you do fly. Maybe that will help your motivation, or maybe not. If you have stories of your own feel free to add them in. I'll start off with one of my favorite missions during my career, which was the multi-purpose range complex in Korea. We spent 9 months on a rotation in Korea as our last hurrah befor
    8 points
  6. This one will be a little more difficult for me as flight school was over a decade ago. There are some standout moments in my memory, but it’s tough to build a complete narration. I am sure most of what I write will be very familiar to anyone with silver wings, but this isn’t intended to be interesting for them. Let’s get to it. My days typically started by throwing my uniform on, grabbing my gear, and running out the door to catch the bus. I lived in Enterprise, so I had a gate to get through and a short drive, and I was almost always running late. Going around the last corner down
    8 points
  7. Way back when, while working as a young CFI, I was tasked with the responsibility of manning the counter at the school. For a measly, eight bucks an hour I had to answer the phone, dispatch flights and greet visitors. One slow day, I was sitting on my rear reading the latest edition of Rotor&Wing, dreaming of my future, when a fellow CFI appeared and used the fax machine to send off resume to a perspective employer. When I glimpsed at his resume, I saw he had listed Bell 206 in the Aircraft Flown column. Knowing his flying background was basically the same as mine, I had to ask, “How much
    8 points
  8. Today’s selection. I got Guns Babyyyyyy
    7 points
  9. My time in Afghanistan was largely uneventful. OH-58s had a reputation with the senior leaders in RC East so we had quite a leash put on us while we were there. Initially we weren't even supposed to deploy with the brigade, but there was a need for us and they quickly called our troop over to assist with security. We never quite figured out what they were afraid of us doing, as the Apaches were out blowing the countryside up left and right, LoL! I spent most of my time on the midnight shift, waking up at 11pm and stumbling my way to the shower trailer to get ready. After that it was a
    7 points
  10. Do it anyway. Especially as a WOJG. Maintain your ground and assert dominance. Your rater will totally have your back.* *Rater will not have your back. SP may murder you. Blend in and wear the same gear everyone else has. Help out your unit and they will help you. Void in Canada.
    6 points
  11. I finished up my time after the OH-58D had been retired by flying OH-58Cs for Eagle Team at the National Training Center. That was a fantastic assignment. The flying was great, no deployments, and home every night. One of the more unique things we did at least for modern Army Aviation was single pilot flying. It was our regular mission to take a bird out solo, whether to pick up our OC counterparts, fly the birds down to get washed or maintenance, or sometimes just to put time on the aircraft. We even did solo NVG flights. NTC is roughly the size of the state of Rhode Island, and goe
    6 points
  12. 6 points
  13. Thank you for the stories, and I seriously hope this thread takes off. Though the ten year ADSO didn't change my mind on what I wanted to do, all these posts about it definitely have me worried about what to expect for my potential future. Stories like the ones you shared make me feel excited again about the prospect of flying for the Army, even if it only makes a small percent of everything you do as a WO and aviator.
    5 points
  14. There's 2 seperate boards. Active duty and civilian. You aren't competing with enlisted personnel. There's no favoring prior service, what they favor is the experience garnered from that.
    5 points
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