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  1. Well I'll chime in with some MI fixed wing perspective. 1. Flight time. You live to deploy. You fly while deployed. The bulk of your hours usually come when you are deployed. When you're back home, you'll probably fly between 100% and 150% of your minimums. That equates to somewhere around 150 hours a year. Or like The Dude said, about 3 hours of flying a week. This need to deploy/high op tempo can stress a family out bad. Between all the TDY's, training exercises, gunnery, field work, and actual deployments, a lot of time is spent away from home. This obviously has a direct statistical correlation to divorce rates. Get your whole life ripped out from under you a time or two and you're bound to be bitter about it. 2. The other 40+ hours of your week. Well, this is going to vary wildly. It depends on your command climate, your air-frame, your fellow aviators/friends, your mission, your additional duty, how well you are liked, and what duty station you get, etc. I am pretty much in S6 for life. I love it. I wholeheartedly look forward to going in to work every day. I like the split between 2-3 flights a week and the rest spent dealing with tech issues and the rest of comm life. Other people see their additional duties as a means to an end, or a necessary evil in order to enjoy flying. Yeah, if I got stuck in ALSE, or TACOPS, or S1, I would definitely not enjoy it as much. Oh, and with all the rules, regulations, and additional craziness that the Army does, it definitely sucks some of the fun/relaxation/exhilaration out of the flying you do get to do. 3. Why warrants are so salty. Well, I have many theories on this, and they all apply some of the time in certain cases. Warrants were most often prior service of some kind. Many of them wanted forever to fly but a lot of them saw it as a means to stay in the military but instead of doing whatever crappy job they had before, they could serve out the remainder of their time doing something potentially fun (aka flying). They also like the idea that warrants are supposed to be able to get away with way more than a typical soldier should be able to. (It's every E4's dream to be able to skip PT, formations, etc at will, and have no adverse consequences). The reality is that there are two types of warrants, there are aviation warrants, and then there are tech warrants. Tech warrants are rare. They have a very specific skill set. A CW2 typically will only work with captains (O3's) and above. Company commanders, BN XO's, BN CDRs. A CW3 pretty much only deals with/reports to MAJ's and above (and is at a brigade level). CW4 forget about it if you aren't an O5. Combine that rarity with how that command structure works, and warrants get to do whatever they damn well please because everyone knows they know their lane inside and out and you don't want to piss them off. That is what most branches think warrants are. But then we have this little (fairly large) side of it that is aviation. You have 1LT's giving orders/being platoon leaders for CW2's and CW3's. 1SG's that key in on that and don't give aviators the same level of clout that they would as a tech warrant. You often have as many warrants in a flight company as you do lower enlisted (we have more). That 1LT who has no idea what they're doing is writing your OER as a CW3 with 14 years in the Army. That same LT is blowing up your phone because you aren't at PT or some dumb training meeting. Aviation warrants want to think they're tech warrants, but we aren't. We try oh so hard, but we are viewed in my opinion in many cases as flying privates. This makes a great deal of us salty as hell. 4. Next we have the pay issue (this applies much more to fixed wing than rotary, but it still applies to them as well). Warrant's get paid dirt compared to their commissioned counterparts. An equivalent time in grade CW3 and a CPT with the same amount of time in service, well, that CPT makes about 30k more a year when all is said and done. This happens, yet warrants are rooked/conned into doing many of the same jobs/same responsibilities as their commissioned counterparts. Warrants occasionally serve as platoon leaders, XO's, BN S1's, S6's, deputy commanders and even commanders of forward footprints. They want us to go to the same useless types of advanced courses that don't really give much college credit or hold any weight if you're trying to complete a bachelors degree (which all aviation warrants want if they want to eventually be airline pilots). Yes we are the only ones that qualify for the bonus, but that bonus barely brings us up to what our commissioned counterparts make normally, and we have to sign our lives away for 3 years. So, that explains that portion. 5. Ah yes, the degree portion. So, I'm going to get some nasty-grams and some hate for this, but here I go anyway. Warrants are cheap labor for aviation. The only way the Army can get away with this and still keep pilot applicants flooding in is the lack of a degree requirement. At the end of the day that's the only real difference, because the Air force has command track officers and technical track officers that only do flying related stuff. The Army could do the same thing, it would just cost a lot of money. Now for the part that will get me the hate mail. Aviation warrants as I've said are typically prior service. Most of the aviation warrants I've met that aren't street to seat have been in the military since they were 18-20 years old. They don't have an appreciation for how the real world works. They never went to a real college (no online BS doesn't count, you don't get exposed to new people, experiences, you bullshit your way though 50 forums and do some tests and poof there's a degree). They've never had to pay for civilian insurance, they've never had to worry about losing their job next week, they've never had to work in a group project with an LGBTQ Hindu snake whisperer, or worry about getting a raise, or stress about moving expenses (I get it, it can still be stressful but the military greatly reduces that with $$$), and they genuinely don't appreciate how shitty being a regional airline pilot actually is. They suffer from a severe, chronic case of grass is greener syndrome. This portion of their negativity you will just have to learn to get past or take lightly. The other things I've mentioned are valid complaints, but the lack of perspective is just something you'll have to deal with as a warrant officer in aviation. -The positives. I can't speak for my rotor-head brethren, but I can speak for MI fixed wing. We have tons of training opportunities, tuition assistance, the best education program offered in the world (GI Bill), spouse education benefits, bush pilot school, upset recovery, airborne, air assault, whatever dumb school you can think of, if you spin it right and talk to the right person, you can get it! You'll meet some of the best people and friends you could ever hope to find in the seat next to you, on deployments, sleeping in tents (or hotels ). You'll literally get millions of dollars of training, new life experiences, benefits, friends and a hell of an adrenaline rush. Your results may vary, everyone's journey is different. You could fly your 60 over a nude beach and have everyone cheer. You could get shot in the ass and have a nasty case of PTSD every time you sit down on the shitter and here a pop. You might fly a general in the back that writes you an LOR to a sweet gig at Boeing. You may get divorced after you walk in on your wife cheating on you with your best friend. Or you may go to experimental test pilot school and end up in NASA's astronaut program. There's probably a statistically relevant chance that you will have a negative experience in the Army as an aviator. The green weenie doesn't discriminate, but you can sure armor up with a positive attitude and good choices to at least lessen its wrath. Take the opportunity kid. Make the most of it. Give it what you have and don't let the negative nancy's beat you down. Just know it won't all be roses and rip its. PM me if you have any questions.
    11 points
  2. This one will be a little more difficult for me as flight school was over a decade ago. There are some standout moments in my memory, but it’s tough to build a complete narration. I am sure most of what I write will be very familiar to anyone with silver wings, but this isn’t intended to be interesting for them. Let’s get to it. My days typically started by throwing my uniform on, grabbing my gear, and running out the door to catch the bus. I lived in Enterprise, so I had a gate to get through and a short drive, and I was almost always running late. Going around the last corner down the hill was done with held breath and my fingers crossed that there wouldn’t be a line. Nobody in front of me today, solid! Sitting in the bus lot I would use what little time I had to cram the 5s and 9s I was supposed to study the night before. I think 90% of my learning occurred during those short bus rides to Cairns. I had to do it though, because I knew what was coming. The preflight briefing. Gulp. It was an intimidating room full of desks with crusty old IPs on one side and students on the other. In the front stood our flight leader, scanning the room looking for the first student to start our daily questions and quiz. I always did my best to look attentive but not make eye contact. It never worked. There was always one or two questions nobody wanted to answer. You’d count heads to try and figure out where you were in line. ”Mr B, what is the definition of a warning?” Thank God, I know this one. “A warning is an operating practice that if not correctly followed could result in personal injury or loss of life.” Whew, nailed it! Wait, why is Mr Carter shaking his head? ”A warning is an operating procedure or practice, that if not correctly followed...” Damn. The rest of the briefing went over weather, tasks, etc. The IPs would squawk at each other and argue about their interpretation of the manuals. Blah blah blah. Morning flight line was a godsend during the hot Alabama summer. The aircraft were cool, I was cool, the IP was cool, and we didn’t have to deal with thunderstorms. A short bus ride to the parking pad and there she was, a bright orange and white Jet Ranger, covered in dew, quietly tied down and waiting. Preflight was a team effort, my stick buddy and I diligently looking the aircraft over. I read the checklist, went through the motions, but honestly had no idea what I was looking for. It took a couple years to really develop a good idea of how to preflight a helicopter. Time to fly. I’m riding in back for the trip to the stage field. Sweet, I don’t have to worry about callouts today. Don’t hot start it LT! A nice start, a wobbly hover down the taxi lane and we’re off to the stage field. We land at the stage field and I hop out, my turn to wait in the shack. All my second period friends are walking in as well. Someone is missing, one of the Dutch guys, must have had to bump aircraft back at Cairns. Inside we all nervously shoot the breeze, joke about the briefing, and roll our eyes at the guy who is God’s gift to Army Aviation as he tells us his technique for hovering autos. He’s a real expert with 10 hours in the bird. All too soon it’s my turn to strap in. I help my buddy get his gear out, swap radios, and climb in. I’ve always loved going from the loud scream of a turbine outside the helicopter to the relatively quiet whine on the inside. A quick moment to savor the sound and *click* I plug my helmet in. “Welcome, you ready? Your controls.” Gulp. I lift off with a smooth pull of collective. Nope, too much! Now my nose is turning. We’re drifting. Ah crap! Dance the feet, wiggle the hand, finally we’re stable. I start nudging us down the taxi lane feeling more confident with each second. I got this. ”Hovering auto.” Wait, wait, wait, pull! Nice this will be a good one. We haven’t touched down yet, sh*t! Pull, pull, damn out of collective. *slam* We sit there rocking back and forth and I wait for it. “Well that was ugly. Run it up let’s head over to the grass.” Damn. After a couple more hovering autos it’s time to head into the pattern and do some from the air. Around and around we go. Too much speed on touchdown, too much flare, not enough flare. Entry was a bit late, airspeed got slow, airspeed got fast. Over and over until I was covered in sweat and it was time to go pick up my stick buddy and head back to Cairns. I always liked the flight back. Just cruising back to base with the hard part over with. Land, shut down, and head in for the debrief. Done flying for the day we’d get our study assignment for the night, and it was off to lunch then class in the afternoon. At the end of the day I’d head back home, start up the grill, and crack a cold beer. The sun going down, pastel colors taking over the sky, the air starting to cool off again. I’d sit back to watch the Blackhawks fly by headed out to the stage fields and think to myself “man, I’m actually here. That’s going to be me soon.” I’d be lying if I said I enjoyed flying during Primary. I love flying, I crave being in the air. But I dreaded every single flight of Primary. It was an incredibly stressful phase, but man was I glad to finally be at the controls of a helicopter that said United States Army on the side.
    8 points
  3. Today’s selection. I got Guns Babyyyyyy
    7 points
  4. Do it anyway. Especially as a WOJG. Maintain your ground and assert dominance. Your rater will totally have your back.* *Rater will not have your back. SP may murder you. Blend in and wear the same gear everyone else has. Help out your unit and they will help you. Void in Canada.
    6 points
  5. Recruiter just informed me that I was accepted. Huge relief after 2 years of building my packet
    5 points
  6. No operator cares about an entry level pilot having 50 hours in a jet ranger, because no one is going to trust you with an asset that expensive anyways. Nor is any operator going to use a 200 hour pilot as an SIC; you’re more of a liability than an asset. Specialized career training as an entry level pilot is pointless. You’re not going to be doing firefighting, sling load or power line work at 200 hours. Indentured servitude is bad for the whole industry. Don’t ever volunteer to work for free or a substantially reduced rate. Work your ass off and put in 110% effort, and earn the job with work ethic and determination... but don’t do it for a bottom rate; it drags everyone else down with you. The reality is you start this career in one of two ways; as a civilian CFI or serving in the military. Neither is glamorous, no one likes the idea of ‘paying your dues’ year after year, but that’s the way it works. Once you get 1,000-2,000 hours under your belt and prove you can handle yourself and the aircraft, start looking at pathways into more specialized types of flying. Flying tours/offshore in your first turbine helicopter, utility in an R44, and MD500 off of tuna boats, SIC for utility/fire, etc.
    5 points
  7. Congrats to the S2S applicants who got selected. Hopefully some favorable results for us on the AD side still playing the waiting game 😅💪
    4 points
  8. I guess they're just using this as a tactic to weed out the people that get overly anxious wait to hear the results lol.
    4 points
  9. Hey guys my recruiter gave me a call and informed me I was selected, second look.
    4 points
  10. Age: 31 Rank: Civilian GT: 135 SIFT: 69 OPAT: Heavy (APFT no longer required according to my recruiter) Education: Bachelors in Accounting - 3.0 GPA Physical: Stamped / Approved with waivers (minor surgeries) LOR: CW4 (160th) / College Professor / MLB Scouting Supervisor / College AD Deployment: none Other: 50 Flight Hours in R44 / about 20 of those PIC Selected this morning. Been working on my packet for 2+ years and I would be more than happy to help anyone here who needs or would like some guidance. I had a great mentor in the CW4 and I'll gladly pass along the knowledge.
    4 points
  11. Trust me, Claymore, if you become a helicopter pilot, you will not have to sit for "hours on end." That's for fixed-wing pilots. Some fixed-wing pilots are lucky enough to have bathrooms onboard, which would be a necessity if I ever decided to pursue that side of aviation. That said, some tour operators will get pissed (sorry for the bad pun) if you have to periodically get out to pee. And if you're an EMS pilot at a site landing in a populated area, finding a secluded spot to relieve yourself could be a problem. Helicopters draw crowds. "What's that man doing, mommy?" "Uhh, what? Oh Lord, nothing, honey. Just don't look, sweetie." "But mommy, he has a penis that's smaller than mine!" "Well, he *is* a helicopter pilot, dear." "But mommy, isn't daddy a helicopter pilot too?" "Yes, he is, dear." (Huge sigh) "Yes, he is." If the situation is chronic and you cannot go for at least a couple of hours without having to pee (or worse), then perhaps aviation is not the career for you.
    4 points
  12. Dang I have to go back in the closet? Let me tell the other gays here 😂
    4 points
  13. I agree with what Spike said; the helicopter market overall is contracting. The three largest helicopter markets are HAA, offshore support and tourism. HAA has been expanding rapidly, but is now in serious jeopardy of additional government regulation. Charging patients $30,000 for a medevac flight, with almost no compensation from insurance companies, cannot continue unchecked. Once the government starts regulating pricing, the market will have to contract; fewer operators / bases/ jobs covering the same area. Meanwhile, offshore support has decreased substantially over the last couple decades. In the earlier days of offshore oil, a massive number of platforms were in proximity to the coastline and serviced by a huge fleet of light helicopters. As it stands today, the shallow water regions are mostly tapped out and major oil companies have transitioned to deep water drilling. Which means fewer flights, fewer aircraft and using heavy airframes (S92, AW139) rather than numerous light aircraft (B206/407). Which ultimately means less jobs. Tourism is facing ever growing noise abatement problems. It already hurt the market in NYC. Tours over the Hudson River were reduced substantially due to complaints from NYC residents. I wouldn’t be surprised if Hawaii is hit next by extra restrictions. And even if tourism were to remain a strong market, very few pilots aspire to spend their career entertaining tourists... Meanwhile, markets like aerial survey and ENG will be completely replaced by UAV’s. Drone technology is rapidly evolving, and will provide the same benefits for the fraction of the cost of a helicopter. I am also expecting police departments and US Customs / Border Patrol to transition heavily into drones. There will be some situations where helicopters are needed, but surveillance can be handled by drones. I also believe the agriculture market will transition to either drones or unmanned helicopters. Pilots are expensive (and prone to making costly mistakes)... using a drone with highly reliable software would provide extremely high levels of precision and relatively low operating costs. Any job market article from a flight school should go straight in the trash; the ‘Vietnam shortage’ has been mindlessly regurgitated for over a decade. Any Vietnam pilots retiring can be replaced by Iraq/Afghanistan veterans (or a seemingly endless number of civilian CFI/tour pilots). The ‘airline shortage’ is a fallacy as well. There will be times of increased demand, but never a true shortage. Prior to Covid, we saw demand increase. But not enough to make regional airlines a desirable career. Rather than renegotiating labor contracts and offering desirable salaries, the airlines opted to keep salaries low and attract low hour pilots with one time training and new hire bonuses. None of the rotor transition pilots went to the regionals planning to make a career with them... they saw it as a pathway to a major airline or cargo. The plan was to take the training money, take a substantial pay cut and live frugally, until getting a cushy job with a major in a few years. Then they would be making more money than would ever be possible in the helicopter market. I almost went for the carrot myself. Why bother flying heavy helicopters IFR when I could be doing a very similar type of flying for a major airline, making double the money? It only takes a short while on the airlinepilotcentral forums to see the problem with this. Many regional pilots will not make it to the majors. There are numerous stories of pilots with years of Part 121 experience, a college degree, clean record, etc being stuck at their regional. And then when a ‘black swan’ event like 9/11 or Covid occurs, the entire market gets devastated. Some get lucky and avoid the furloughs, airline bankruptcy, and career limbo; they earn a fortune over a glamorous career and can honestly say it was the best job in the world. Many of them, however, get stuck chasing the carrot and it ends up being a not so great career. Airline crews went from 4 positions (PIC, SIC, engineer, navigator) down to 3 (PIC, SIC, engineer) down to 2 (PIC & SIC). The next logical step is a single pilot airliner, with auto-land capability and remote control from a ground station if the pilot is incapacitated. The technology isn’t there just yet, but they are very close. It’s already been implemented in light GA aircraft. And in a society that revolves around making $$$ for executives and investors, you better believe that every effort will be made to slash labor/training costs by using one pilot for Part 121 ops. The airlines (and their investors) stand to make a fortune utilizing single pilot aircraft. I realize this is a lot of doom-and-gloom talk, but I feel it is very important to have realistic expectations. Unlike an industry such as healthcare (which will continue to expand rapidly with lots of jobs available in every state), the helicopter industry will continue contract. It will remain a very competitive market, which unfortunately translates to lower salaries, unfavorable work conditions, and a gypsy lifestyle... constantly moving to where the work is (or long distance commuting).
    4 points
  14. The definition of a WO not the WO creed. I don’t want anyone going to learn that long ass thing when that’s not what they need to know. Reference: DA PAM 600-3, Chapter 3, Para. 3-9 up to the point where it says progressive assignment and education.
    4 points
  15. I called a recruiter & they said possibly Wednesday or Friday. I’ll still be refreshing every 10 minutes until then.
    4 points
  16. Highly recommend him. That man single handedly is the only reason I made it over all my hurdles and into a seat at Rucker
    4 points
  17. It will vary wildly depending on your unit. Yes you will have additional duties. When you get them is what changes. At my unit, we dont give them over until you are RL1 and kinda found your feet. Ill trade PBO/Supply to be the fridge b*tch any day. Heres the thing though. Whatever additional duties you get, own it and make it better. Additional duties are what will write your OER until you are tracked. Stay positive, crush your additional duties and you will probably be looking at PC well before your peers who dont. For the flying portion as a reference, in the past 12 months in garrison Ive logged 240 hours while balancing PBO/Supply and making PC. Yes it sucks at times but its also opened up doors and opportunities because of the high visibility additional duty that it is. Ive done them all so if you have any questions going forward, let me know.
    4 points
  18. It refreshes HRC all day or else it gets the hose again… 😂
    3 points
  19. 210805 selections.
    3 points
  20. Recruiter just called to let me know I’ve been accepted! Looking forward to what’s next. Good luck to everyone!
    3 points
  21. Just got the call guys I'M IN!!! Unofficial for now but recruiter let me know what he found out... Stats earlier! Best of luck to all of you and will keep you posted on dates! Looking forward to see you at Mother Rucker!
    3 points
  22. Our Son Selected First Look May 2021 Street to Seat / High School to Flight School AGE: 17 ASVAB GT: 110 SIFT: 53 OPAT: Heavy EDUCATION: Graduates High School 29MAY2021 (this Saturday), 3.10 GPA FLIGHT: 78.8 hours, 19.6 hours solo/PIC, Airplane Single Engine Land (ASEL) Private Pilot’s License BOARD: May 2021 LORS: Aviation O-8, Aviation CW5, Aviation CW4, Aviation CW4, JROTC Instructor (Retired Artillery CW4), Michigan County Sheriff that has known my son and our family for 50 years OTHER INFO: 120 hours of volunteer service between three separate civic organizations, 3 Years JROTC PHYSICAL: Class 1A Physical, stamped I have the privilege of swearing him in at MEPS this Thursday...honored and obviously proud as hell!
    3 points
  23. I asked my recruiter about when the list would come out and he said “congrats”
    3 points
  24. Sounds about right, civilians don’t have CAC access to get onto the HRC website so the recruiter has to inform them. You should know by tomorrow. us AD schmucks will know next Friday lol
    3 points
  25. The WOSB MILPER message should come out next Friday (the 28th), Saturday the latest given that the 28th through 31st is a DONSA for Memorial Day. That was the same case for March's board. The WOSB MILPER message was published on a Saturday afternoon 1 week after the board, and that weekend was a DONSA as well.
    3 points
  26. Good luck, everyone...🤘🏻🤘🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🇺🇸🇺🇸
    3 points
  27. Street to seat here, I just contracted and swore in. I ship out in July to BCT at Fort Leonard Wood then to WOCS in October.
    3 points
  28. Thank you for all the insights in this forum. It has been very helpful. I have been following the threads since September 2020 with 0 previous knowledge about this process/ program. I submitted for January 2021 but didn't get boarded because Recruiter and I couldn't submit corrections before USAREC corrections deadline. AGE : 32 (turning 33 next week) RANK : Civ (with previous military experience) GT : 128 SIFT : 55 OPAT: Heavy EDUCATION : BS Civ Engineering, 2.85 GPA. Working towards a Master's with 6 credits so far. PHYSICAL : Stamped LORs : O6 USAF Pilot Retired, O6 USMC Pilot Retired, 153D CW4 USAR , O5 USAF Retired /Faculty member/ Navigator, E9 USAF former NCO, Pastor/Friend/Supervisor NCOERs: N/A WAIVERS : None FLIGHT HOURS: None
    3 points
  29. Honestly can we get back on topic with the wonderful stories that actually promote aviation and not the irrelevant bullshit about bleed valves from 40 years ago.
    3 points
  30. I took the SIFT yesterday. Here is a solid in-depth write up on how it went, what it’s like, and background information about me. Background Age: 20 Education: 2.5 years college, Aviation Science major (100 hours of single engine fixed wing flight time) MOS: 15T My score: 58 Perceived difficulty of the SIFT: 6.5/10 Studying I studied for about a month, trying to spend 30 minutes each day studying and familiarizing myself with the content of the SIFT. The last week I was trying to spend 45 to 60 minutes per day studying. I should say that I have known about the SIFT and it’s sub test since August, I just needed time in my schedule to study and actually take it. · I bought the Aegis group complete SIFT study guide (paper) from Amazon Grade: A- Nothing out of date, rather accurate for my test. The only reason why it’s not an A+ is because it’s a book and didn’t translate well to my online notes. · I lurked around and read through just about every post here on the Army Aviation subreddit and several on Vertical Reference Not really a great source on actual questions but it made me feel more confident in what the test was like, this is where I learned about most of the test prep resources. I don’t really count these as a study source · I did each Trivium (free) online test about a dozen times over the course of 3 weeks Grade: B These tests were nice for having a feeling of what it’s like to do an online test and it tells you what you missed and what the correct answer was. The layouts are all weird and that didn’t help much for the simple drawings and hidden figures. Note that the reading section is not really accurate to the real SIFT at all. Over all, this is a good site to study, but it doesn’t get the small things right. · I did the Military Flight Tests online tests as well in the last week of my studying Grade: C The test is good for knowing how fast you need to go. It does grade you on accuracy but doesn’t tell you what you missed. The timing makes it very difficult for simple drawings and hidden figures since there’s not very many to do in their given time span. I’m nearly positive their given average scores are all BS by the way. · I read through FAA Helicopter Flying Handbook chapters 1, 2, 3, 4 and 9 Grade: A+ The FAA Helicopter Flying Handbook has a bunch of content and is a great resource to study from. My only critique is that there’s a lot of information in it and I’m lazy didn’t want to sift through it all. Many people recommend reading the whole thing cover to cover. If you don’t have a background with helicopters and flight physics, I would recommend it as well. · Helicopter lessons in 10 minutes or less I watched 4 of these videos, particularly retreating blade stall, dissymmetry of lift, advancing blade compressibility, and effective translational lift. Grade: A I think these videos are great, but many of them are too advanced for what you’ll see on the SIFT. Excellent for flight training though. If you’re shooting for that 80 and you have the time for it, then watch these videos. · MSC ASVAB study sites for mechanical comprehension and mathematics. I can’t really grade these, but I still recommend them. The ASVAB math is a little less difficult than the SIFT and the same goes for mechanical comprehension THE SIFT The DOD civilian who set up my test took me into a little room right next to his office, I’d say 4x4x8 feet. I was given 2 sheets of paper, 3 pencils and some big noise cancelling headphones. My test proctor allowed me to bring gum and a water bottle in with me. Watch, phone, and all other electronics had to stay in the office with him. Once he left the testing room, I was allowed to take my mask off and proceed with the test on my own time. Pre info: you have to fill out some background info about the following categories: Major and GPA if you have any higher education after high school Flight experience, number of hours, type of aircraft you have experience in Video Game and flight simulator game experience What video game console you played on and hours per week you spent gaming What component/branch of the military you’re in. Between each section, you get 3 to 7 slides of directions to prepare you for the next subtest. You get unlimited time to go through these directions, so you can take a 15-minute break between each section if you wanted to. Simple Drawings Completed 89/100 my estimated score 83/100 I was very jittery, out of some anxiety and a fair amount of caffeine, I miss clicked/double clicked a few of them. The shapes are smaller than I expected from the Trivium Test prep. There is a little bit of lag between each question, so you have a bit more time than it first appears. This section is just about your lizard brain instincts about finding the odd one out. This is basically what the test layout is like for Simple Drawings. The boxes aren’t that defined but Microsoft paint is what I had to work with. You click directly on the shape that isn’t like the others in the SIFT. Simple drawings question layout (imgur) Hidden Figures Completed 37/50 my estimated score 25/50 I still felt a bit jittery. I really feel like Hidden figures is hit or miss. I didn’t know how to study for these, you just either see it or you don’t. The layout is the same as the Simple Drawings, except in place of the row of drawings is the main picture and then you get 5 shapes to choose from. The shapes stayed the same while the main picture changes between each problem. At question #25 or so, one of my shapes switched to another shape, but the rest stayed the same. Army Aviation Information Completed 40/40 with 20 minutes left. The Aviation information, Spatial Apperception and Reading Comprehension subtests allow you to skip, flag, and come back to questions whenever you want. This is the subtest that I felt the most confident in going in, and probably the best in while I was taking the test. Army Aviation information question layout (imgur) There were absolutely no questions on blade regions (stall, driving, driven) Here are the following questions that I guessed on: · What is a skid · Night flights and scanning · Class G operating in weather · What lets you turn the helicopter? changing the amount of tail rotor torque tail rotor thrust tail rotor velocity · Rigid rotor systems (see my drawing above) · When the CG is too far forward…. · When in hovering flight the tail rotor thrust is….? · What decreases the performance of a helicopter more? Warm weather High humidity · The cyclic changes the pitch exactly on the _____? Advancing and retreating blades All of the rotor blades Some more options that I don’t remember · Load element in steady state flight = Less than 1 1 2 3 4 · How do you turn while hovering? · What is the definition of Payload? · What is a Fenestron tail rotor? “is a protected tail rotor of a helicopter operating like a ducted fan. The term Fenestron is a trademark of multinational helicopter manufacturing consortium Airbus Helicopters” – Wikipedia There was a question about the Kiowa warrior which was odd because I was under the impression that the Army doesn’t use them anymore. A few questions about which of the following fits the description of a utility tactical transport helicopter, which of the following is an airframe that US Army Aviators can be trained to fly on, and other airframe names. Spatial Apperception 25/25 questions completed with 33 seconds left. This section is probably the most straight forward. The pictures are all in black and white, land (like a farmer’s field) and darker water. My test didn’t have any cliffs or rocks in the water like some of the study guides showed. The pictures were somewhat difficult to read because the looked like your 5th grade history test that had been photocopied since the 90s. The aircraft was some fixed wing single engine plane with a prop. Not too difficult to see which end was which. Reading Comprehension Completed 20/20 with 12 minutes left over. This section was rather easy for me. Note* The Trivium test prep reading section is like the ASVAB, asking definitions, subjects of the passage, and what most correlates with what the author is saying. The SIFT has one ‘big question’ that applies to each question. If I wrote the directions for this subsection, it would read: “The following section contains 20 passages. For each passage, choose the answer that best summarizes the passage/is most accurate based on the passage.” There are generally 2 choices that don’t make any sense if you actually read the passages. If you read through the passages, look at the choices, re-read and then choose your answer you’ll do well. Math Skills Finished all questions with 15 minutes remaining I haven’t taken a math class since 2019 and have used a calculator for pretty much everything other than basic math. It was a bit rough. There was lots of probability, using dice, a standard deck of cards, and fishing based on how many fish there are in the lake. Know how to multiply fractions. Know long division so you can find speeds. There was a stupid amount of if Elaine runs 8 mph and has 10 miles left in the race and Katy runs 6mph and has 4 miles left in the race, how many minutes apart will they finish. I got some simplifying of polynomials. What is (X-1)1/2 and X-1 I didn’t go over these at all and definitely should’ve Also I got a Log5 in front of a polynomial, no clue what was going on there either. By the way, for the math section they give you the equations for basic geometry (like πr2 and 1/2BH) I was under the impression that they would have it written on a paper sheet or something. Mechanical Comprehension No clue how many questions I got through, the second the subtest was over it went right to my end score. There were no lever questions. I really thought I would get tons of them based on the Trivium test. There were a few gear questions, like which gear goes faster (there was a small one and a big one) and which gears turn the same direction. There was one about the flow of a faucet, nothing difficult there. There were some about electricity, like what Ohms represent, capacitors, Amps. Know the definition of Speed Vs. Work. In a similar note, one question that I found odd was if you have two 10J bricks and pick them both up off the ground to waist height (no actual number given for how high that was) and hold them for 2 minutes, how much work was done? One about using a torque wrench to provide 80-foot lbs of force when the wrench can only produce 60-foot lbs, how much longer would the wrench need to be? Only one question on Newton’s third law, no others mentioned. 2 or 3 questions on velocity and what I now remember is Pascal’s Principle Summary: I think my first 2 weeks of in class time in AIT was more beneficial to me than 1.5 years of flight training. Helicopters are different than fixed wing airplanes and rotors/rotor heads are quite complicated. Leading, lagging, flapping, coning, are all rather new to me, but I learned about them in 15T AIT. I would highly suggest reading the FAA Helicopter Flying Handbook if you have no experience with helicopters/flight. This test is not that hard. If you study reliably for 30 minutes a day for a month you can do just fine. It’s basically that ASVAB but with Army Aviation Information as a subtest. I honestly think that I could’ve walked into the test last month and passed with a 40+. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns feel free to comment.
    3 points
  31. Selected, second look. Congrats to the ones who made it and keep at it to the ones who did not!!
    3 points
  32. Got word that I was allegedly selected today. Major weight off my shoulders there.
    3 points
  33. It's been awhile since I've been around the forum, but it looks like it's still going strong helping people get through the process of becoming an Army Aviator. I'm currently a UH-60L IP/IE, but over the years I had created a study guide to help me with my APARTs and what-not. A few people throughout the years have asked me for a copy of it and seemed to like it so recently I decided to make it easily available and accessible. If you're a new UH-60L pilot or even an experienced UH-60L pilot that wants to refresh their knowledge, check out my study guide website. It's free, so I'm not trying to promote anything to make money or anything. I just want to help people out. Eventually I plan on updating the information to apply to UH-60M's as well. But since I've flown L's for my whole career and probably will for at least the next 3-4 years, that's where my focus has been. Even if you're flying M models a majority of the information in the study guide still applies and could be helpful to you. EDIT: I updated the site to include a UH-60M Study Guide as well. Anyway, if you want to check it out, here's the link.... UH-60 Study Guide Feel free to message me if you have any questions or anything.
    3 points
  34. Top person in my class was a Street to Seater and top 4 Warrants (with another Street to Seater in the mix) beat out all LTs collectively. Top LT was a Westpointer. Never know who's gonna be sh*t hot or hot sh*t.
    3 points
  35. nothing to do with your getting an Army flight school seat, but.... Retired career pilot, Vietnam, IP/CFI, off-shore and then HEMS for the last 16 of 48 years. The last quarter century of my career I used corrective lenses having developed presbyopia, and did so until I retired. I thought what the heck, I wore protective lenses and sunglasses all the time anyhow, so... The year I retired my physical disclosed developing cataracts. So, I had the presbyopic lens exchange, with vision correcting refracting lenses implants. I kick myself for waiting until after my flying career to get my eyes fixed. Yeah, it was a thing and it scared the bejeesus out of me. No, I'm not 20/15 again, but I forgot how the world looked through my own eyes Do it now, if you want to fly. If nothing else, it's a pain carrying a spare pair of glasses, contacts, whatever. Losing a lens in flight single pilot, really, truly sucks. Don't go with the cheapest provider, even if you have to pay the whole tab. This is something you want the best of.
    3 points
  36. Sounds like a good time to just pay the ticket and move on.
    3 points
  37. Unless you are not in the US, it will be a long time before you fly a helicopter that you need an additional rating in. I flew the Schweizer and skipped the Robinson all together. If I were to start today, I would just fly the R-22 and get a few hours in the Schweizer. If you do your CFI in a R-22, you can fly and teach in a Schweizer but the other way around is much more difficult. If you want to become a CFI and have the most options for employment, there really is no other choice than the R-22. If you want to do things really smart, fly airplanes.
    3 points
  38. Traveling around Alabama, Florida and Georgia doing military funerals for vets.
    3 points
  39. Selected S2S as a civilian for this board. I'll be shipping to basic in April. AGE : 23 SERVICE : Non-prior service GT : 137 SIFT: 62 Flight: None APFT: 298 OPAT: Heavy EDUCATION : B.S. Environmental Engineering (3.28 GPA) PHYSICAL : Stamped, no waivers LOR : CW4, college professor, 2 of my hs football coaches
    3 points
  40. When the f*** is the Milper dropping
    3 points
  41. Like I said earlier I enjoy posting these. I’ll try to keep them coming somewhat regularly. Maybe I’ll do a flight school one next...
    3 points
  42. Hey Guys - quick update. I passed my helicopter add-on check ride yesterday! Between COVID and weather it took longer than expected but was an incredible experience. Looking forward to continuing building my skills on both fixed and rotor. Of note, @edspilot was completely correct on all of his comments. It was not helpful for the fixed wing, was at points incredibly frustrating, and it was expensive. It was very rewarding and worth it though for me personally (but likely a bad idea if my goal was only the fixed wing commercial rating).
    3 points
  43. Got an email today that my AFS waiver was approved!! Board ready! I just want it to be November 20th already so I can stop being nervous every day lol. it seems like this thread has been really dead. I don’t know how many applicants are going to be on this board but it doesn’t seem like as much as usual. Good luck guys!
    3 points
  44. I wish I could help you there as I have a few great women in mind. I left the Army a couple years ago, and this year I deleted most of my social media accounts which has caused me to lose contact with most of the folks I served with. Price to pay to keep my sanity... I didn't get around to too many duty stations, just Fort Rucker, Fort Drum, and Fort Irwin. I enjoyed each and have fond memories from all of them. When it comes to organizations it's important to remember that they are constantly evolving. I spent 4 years in the same troop, and during that time I can say there were 3 distinct periods where I could look at pictures and recognize entirely different units. Personnel come and go, leadership changes, training events, deployments, etc. All will shape what a unit is like and the culture within. There was a year that I absolutely hated my life. But things improved again and life went back to being good. As for Army rotary flying, I can tell you with certainty that you will learn to fly to the absolute limit. You're going to get uncomfortable. You're going to get scared. You're going to question why the f**k you chose the Army and this f*cking helicopter to fly. Then you're going to finish the mission, decompress, nervously joke with your best friends about the hairy sh*t you just did and will think to yourself that you couldn't imagine doing anything else. But you're also going to test the edge of wakefulness as you sit at a desk in the middle of the night staring at a phone you hope rings soon so that you can have something to go do. You'll put your muscles to the test as you load and unload storage containers. You'll test your endurance as you march around the parade field for the 5th time that day practicing for the general's change of command. You'll fight to stay conscious as you stand at attention, praying to hear "parade rest" only to then feel your shoulders on fire and hoping to get back to attention soon. Your fingers will hurt from writing your 15th memo that day to go in your inspection binder for your additional duty. You'll sharpen your senses as you search for that one missing lens cap that is f*cking BII for a god damn set of thermal sights that we never use. You'll learn to manage expectations as you pull into your neighborhood to the sound of your phone ringing, with your platoon leader telling you the commander wants to sit down with everyone in 15 minutes for a sync meeting. Would I go back and change anything? No way. Do I want to go back? No f*cking way.
    3 points
  45. Job security, bro.... Ill take 10 years as a WO over 10 years as enlisted any day.
    3 points
  46. Hopefully today's the day!
    3 points
  47. AD has their own MILPER. Usually it rolls out the week after the board, typically Wednesday to Friday if my research holds true.
    3 points
  48. Meh. Soldiers and sailors have been complaining forever. It's what we do. We like to one-up each other to see whose job sucks the most. It's a military ritual. 200 years ago some private was complaining about his commander. "@#%^!% Washington. That m$%^4 F%^&% made us row across the river in the middle of the freezing winter!" Just don't get caught up with it everyday, all day. That is bad for your own mental health as well as the unit. You are going to have additional duties. Do well at them and you'll get recognized. RL progress, fly, know the aircraft and mission. Become a PC. Track IP, MTP or ADSO. Take control of your own career. I have. I average 150-200 hours a year. I could fly more, but I have a lot of additional duties. And sometimes those duties suck. I have them because I have proven that I can do them well. Most of the time these duties are challenging and rewarding. IP/IE/SP/MTP/ME Facility QC Supervisor Company SP I also liaison with the Navy and schedule and plan deck landing quals quarterly.
    3 points
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