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  1. Well I'll chime in with some MI fixed wing perspective. 1. Flight time. You live to deploy. You fly while deployed. The bulk of your hours usually come when you are deployed. When you're back home, you'll probably fly between 100% and 150% of your minimums. That equates to somewhere around 150 hours a year. Or like The Dude said, about 3 hours of flying a week. This need to deploy/high op tempo can stress a family out bad. Between all the TDY's, training exercises, gunnery, field work, and actual deployments, a lot of time is spent away from home. This obviously has a direct statistical corr
    12 points
  2. “Just as a Warrant Officer...” “even if it’s...” go fly somewhere else. If this is how you think of the Warrant Officer corps you’re intending to join and what you think of the job you’re applying for, then we don’t want you, and it sounds like you don’t want it either.
    11 points
  3. We've been hitting the whole 10 year ADSO should you join thing pretty hard lately, and while there's some value in that, it's not relevant to those of you who have already started down this path. I enjoy writing and talking about myself so I'll share some stories about the days when you do fly. Maybe that will help your motivation, or maybe not. If you have stories of your own feel free to add them in. I'll start off with one of my favorite missions during my career, which was the multi-purpose range complex in Korea. We spent 9 months on a rotation in Korea as our last hurrah befor
    8 points
  4. This one will be a little more difficult for me as flight school was over a decade ago. There are some standout moments in my memory, but it’s tough to build a complete narration. I am sure most of what I write will be very familiar to anyone with silver wings, but this isn’t intended to be interesting for them. Let’s get to it. My days typically started by throwing my uniform on, grabbing my gear, and running out the door to catch the bus. I lived in Enterprise, so I had a gate to get through and a short drive, and I was almost always running late. Going around the last corner down
    8 points
  5. Today’s selection. I got Guns Babyyyyyy
    7 points
  6. My time in Afghanistan was largely uneventful. OH-58s had a reputation with the senior leaders in RC East so we had quite a leash put on us while we were there. Initially we weren't even supposed to deploy with the brigade, but there was a need for us and they quickly called our troop over to assist with security. We never quite figured out what they were afraid of us doing, as the Apaches were out blowing the countryside up left and right, LoL! I spent most of my time on the midnight shift, waking up at 11pm and stumbling my way to the shower trailer to get ready. After that it was a
    7 points
  7. Do it anyway. Especially as a WOJG. Maintain your ground and assert dominance. Your rater will totally have your back.* *Rater will not have your back. SP may murder you. Blend in and wear the same gear everyone else has. Help out your unit and they will help you. Void in Canada.
    6 points
  8. I finished up my time after the OH-58D had been retired by flying OH-58Cs for Eagle Team at the National Training Center. That was a fantastic assignment. The flying was great, no deployments, and home every night. One of the more unique things we did at least for modern Army Aviation was single pilot flying. It was our regular mission to take a bird out solo, whether to pick up our OC counterparts, fly the birds down to get washed or maintenance, or sometimes just to put time on the aircraft. We even did solo NVG flights. NTC is roughly the size of the state of Rhode Island, and goe
    6 points
  9. No operator cares about an entry level pilot having 50 hours in a jet ranger, because no one is going to trust you with an asset that expensive anyways. Nor is any operator going to use a 200 hour pilot as an SIC; you’re more of a liability than an asset. Specialized career training as an entry level pilot is pointless. You’re not going to be doing firefighting, sling load or power line work at 200 hours. Indentured servitude is bad for the whole industry. Don’t ever volunteer to work for free or a substantially reduced rate. Work your ass off and put in 110% effort, and earn th
    5 points
  10. The Army needs pilots. *NEEDS* I saw a girl go through WOCS 4 times. Its just like the Chief who signed on to my packet said. I told him I was FQ-S and he simply screamed into the phone, “THEY’VE LOWERED THE STANDARDS!” You will be fine getting through SERE without offing an exceptionally cute bunny.
    5 points
  11. Thank you for the stories, and I seriously hope this thread takes off. Though the ten year ADSO didn't change my mind on what I wanted to do, all these posts about it definitely have me worried about what to expect for my potential future. Stories like the ones you shared make me feel excited again about the prospect of flying for the Army, even if it only makes a small percent of everything you do as a WO and aviator.
    5 points
  12. Hey guys my recruiter gave me a call and informed me I was selected, second look.
    4 points
  13. Age: 31 Rank: Civilian GT: 135 SIFT: 69 OPAT: Heavy (APFT no longer required according to my recruiter) Education: Bachelors in Accounting - 3.0 GPA Physical: Stamped / Approved with waivers (minor surgeries) LOR: CW4 (160th) / College Professor / MLB Scouting Supervisor / College AD Deployment: none Other: 50 Flight Hours in R44 / about 20 of those PIC Selected this morning. Been working on my packet for 2+ years and I would be more than happy to help anyone here who needs or would like some guidance. I had a great mentor in the CW4 a
    4 points
  14. Trust me, Claymore, if you become a helicopter pilot, you will not have to sit for "hours on end." That's for fixed-wing pilots. Some fixed-wing pilots are lucky enough to have bathrooms onboard, which would be a necessity if I ever decided to pursue that side of aviation. That said, some tour operators will get pissed (sorry for the bad pun) if you have to periodically get out to pee. And if you're an EMS pilot at a site landing in a populated area, finding a secluded spot to relieve yourself could be a problem. Helicopters draw crowds. "What's that man doing, mommy?" "
    4 points
  15. Dang I have to go back in the closet? Let me tell the other gays here 😂
    4 points
  16. I agree with what Spike said; the helicopter market overall is contracting. The three largest helicopter markets are HAA, offshore support and tourism. HAA has been expanding rapidly, but is now in serious jeopardy of additional government regulation. Charging patients $30,000 for a medevac flight, with almost no compensation from insurance companies, cannot continue unchecked. Once the government starts regulating pricing, the market will have to contract; fewer operators / bases/ jobs covering the same area. Meanwhile, offshore support has decreased substantially over the la
    4 points
  17. The definition of a WO not the WO creed. I don’t want anyone going to learn that long ass thing when that’s not what they need to know. Reference: DA PAM 600-3, Chapter 3, Para. 3-9 up to the point where it says progressive assignment and education.
    4 points
  18. I called a recruiter & they said possibly Wednesday or Friday. I’ll still be refreshing every 10 minutes until then.
    4 points
  19. Highly recommend him. That man single handedly is the only reason I made it over all my hurdles and into a seat at Rucker
    4 points
  20. They’ll probably just be executed to prevent classified data spillage. 🤫
    4 points
  21. Potentially the best thread on this forum. Keep them coming! I don't have any deployments under me but I've had the opportunity to fly to some amazing places, see amazing things, fly amazing aircraft and be around some of the best people in the world (WOs) India:
    4 points
  22. Id share some stories if i had more time to type them up but i can make a list for now. Korea: Flying the trace through Seoul is one of the coolest things ive done Mountainous low level near the no fly area was fun Noe river running through LZ Tom and Jerry States: Buzzing the statue of liberty at an altitude not to be put online Cross country staying in awesome hotels in awesome cities (dallas, nashville, columbus) Working with AFSOC for a large scale exercise at Eglin(more fun cross country stops also) NOE flying through the Adirondacks is
    4 points
  23. Better this than the endless “January Board” “March Board” “WOCS 20-22” threads.
    4 points
  24. If you're a street to seat kid, I can look up your name as well.
    4 points
  25. It will vary wildly depending on your unit. Yes you will have additional duties. When you get them is what changes. At my unit, we dont give them over until you are RL1 and kinda found your feet. Ill trade PBO/Supply to be the fridge b*tch any day. Heres the thing though. Whatever additional duties you get, own it and make it better. Additional duties are what will write your OER until you are tracked. Stay positive, crush your additional duties and you will probably be looking at PC well before your peers who dont. For the flying portion as a reference, in the past 12 months in garri
    4 points
  26. Thank you for all the insights in this forum. It has been very helpful. I have been following the threads since September 2020 with 0 previous knowledge about this process/ program. I submitted for January 2021 but didn't get boarded because Recruiter and I couldn't submit corrections before USAREC corrections deadline. AGE : 32 (turning 33 next week) RANK : Civ (with previous military experience) GT : 128 SIFT : 55 OPAT: Heavy EDUCATION : BS Civ Engineering, 2.85 GPA. Working towards a Master's with 6 credits so far. PHYSICAL : Stamped LORs : O6 USAF P
    3 points
  27. Honestly can we get back on topic with the wonderful stories that actually promote aviation and not the irrelevant bullshit about bleed valves from 40 years ago.
    3 points
  28. Selected, second look. Congrats to the ones who made it and keep at it to the ones who did not!!
    3 points
  29. I took the SIFT yesterday. Here is a solid in-depth write up on how it went, what it’s like, and background information about me. Background Age: 20 Education: 2.5 years college, Aviation Science major (100 hours of single engine fixed wing flight time) MOS: 15T My score: 58 Perceived difficulty of the SIFT: 6.5/10 Studying I studied for about a month, trying to spend 30 minutes each day studying and familiarizing myself with the content of the SIFT. The last week I was trying to spend 45 to 60 minutes per day studying. I should say
    3 points
  30. Top person in my class was a Street to Seater and top 4 Warrants (with another Street to Seater in the mix) beat out all LTs collectively. Top LT was a Westpointer. Never know who's gonna be sh*t hot or hot sh*t.
    3 points
  31. nothing to do with your getting an Army flight school seat, but.... Retired career pilot, Vietnam, IP/CFI, off-shore and then HEMS for the last 16 of 48 years. The last quarter century of my career I used corrective lenses having developed presbyopia, and did so until I retired. I thought what the heck, I wore protective lenses and sunglasses all the time anyhow, so... The year I retired my physical disclosed developing cataracts. So, I had the presbyopic lens exchange, with vision correcting refracting lenses implants. I kick myself for waiting until after my flying career to get my
    3 points
  32. Sounds like a good time to just pay the ticket and move on.
    3 points
  33. Unless you are not in the US, it will be a long time before you fly a helicopter that you need an additional rating in. I flew the Schweizer and skipped the Robinson all together. If I were to start today, I would just fly the R-22 and get a few hours in the Schweizer. If you do your CFI in a R-22, you can fly and teach in a Schweizer but the other way around is much more difficult. If you want to become a CFI and have the most options for employment, there really is no other choice than the R-22. If you want to do things really smart, fly airplanes.
    3 points
  34. Traveling around Alabama, Florida and Georgia doing military funerals for vets.
    3 points
  35. Like I said earlier I enjoy posting these. I’ll try to keep them coming somewhat regularly. Maybe I’ll do a flight school one next...
    3 points
  36. Hey Guys - quick update. I passed my helicopter add-on check ride yesterday! Between COVID and weather it took longer than expected but was an incredible experience. Looking forward to continuing building my skills on both fixed and rotor. Of note, @edspilot was completely correct on all of his comments. It was not helpful for the fixed wing, was at points incredibly frustrating, and it was expensive. It was very rewarding and worth it though for me personally (but likely a bad idea if my goal was only the fixed wing commercial rating).
    3 points
  37. Got an email today that my AFS waiver was approved!! Board ready! I just want it to be November 20th already so I can stop being nervous every day lol. it seems like this thread has been really dead. I don’t know how many applicants are going to be on this board but it doesn’t seem like as much as usual. Good luck guys!
    3 points
  38. I wish I could help you there as I have a few great women in mind. I left the Army a couple years ago, and this year I deleted most of my social media accounts which has caused me to lose contact with most of the folks I served with. Price to pay to keep my sanity... I didn't get around to too many duty stations, just Fort Rucker, Fort Drum, and Fort Irwin. I enjoyed each and have fond memories from all of them. When it comes to organizations it's important to remember that they are constantly evolving. I spent 4 years in the same troop, and during that time I can say there were
    3 points
  39. Job security, bro.... Ill take 10 years as a WO over 10 years as enlisted any day.
    3 points
  40. Hopefully today's the day!
    3 points
  41. AD has their own MILPER. Usually it rolls out the week after the board, typically Wednesday to Friday if my research holds true.
    3 points
  42. You ever thought about writing a book? I'd buy a copy. You're a great storyteller.
    3 points
  43. EFFECTIVE 01 OCTOBER 2020, ANYONE SELECTED FOR INITIAL ENTRY FLIGHT TRAINING UNDER ARMY REGULATION 611-110 IS SUBJECT TO THE GUIDANCE IN THIS MESSAGE. 4.A. ON OR AFTER 01 OCTOBER 2020, ANYONE SELECTED FOR AND ENTERS INTO INITIAL ENTRY FLIGHT TRAINING TO SERVE IN— 4.A.1. THE REGULAR ARMY, WILL INCUR A 10-YEAR ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE OBLIGATION. 4.A.2. THE SELECTED RESERVE, WILL INCUR A 10-YEAR RESERVE SERVICE OBLIGATION TO REMAIN IN AN ACTIVE STATUS AND SERVE IN AN ARNG OR USAR TOE/TDA TROOP PROGRAM UNIT. 4.B. ANYONE WHO ENTERED INTO A SERVICE AGREEMENT BEFORE 01 OCTOBER 2020 WI
    3 points
  44. Good article but not really raising any points that haven't been discussed here. One thing I see from the 10 year ADSO, which ends up being a ~12 year additional commitment, is that there is a sweet spot for enlisted applicants. If you have 10+ years in service you are now committed to serve beyond 20 years. I'm not sure that's too palatable, but I've never been in that position. The sweet spot it would seem is for soldiers who are relatively junior with less than 10 years of service, which keeps them retained for longer but reduces the overall experience of the Warrant Officer Corp.
    3 points
  45. Folks, listen to zaurus.
    3 points
  46. Fail a pt test a bunch and you're all set. Anyhow, a 10 year ADSO is an ungodly amount for a branch without a proper Aviation culture. Really sucks for all the street2seat guys coming in or anyone that has prior Aviation experience on the outside. For all you upcoming applicants --- You need to really dig deep down and envision "giving up" potentially up to 12 years on a single contract and what that may or may not do to your life.
    3 points
  47. Got selected! first look! Idk if you guys have seen my prior post but this sh*t has been a huge uphill battle just getting my package in. Service transfer, one exception to policy request, recruiters in three separate states... huge battle. Keep fighting guys
    3 points
  48. Now that I got lifestyle out fo the way let me fill you with some stoke for the flying part of the job. Some of my favorite things: 1. Flying low and slow. The thing about Army flying at least on the scout side was that the majority of our time was spent just above the trees, flying with the doors off between 50-90 knots. It's incredible how connected you feel to what's happening on the ground, while still having the mobility of flying. You'll be buzzing along and all of the sudden you'll feel the air get cooler, you'll feel the moisture on your face, and you'll realize you just crossed
    3 points
  49. Meh. Soldiers and sailors have been complaining forever. It's what we do. We like to one-up each other to see whose job sucks the most. It's a military ritual. 200 years ago some private was complaining about his commander. "@#%^!% Washington. That m$%^4 F%^&% made us row across the river in the middle of the freezing winter!" Just don't get caught up with it everyday, all day. That is bad for your own mental health as well as the unit. You are going to have additional duties. Do well at them and you'll get recognized. RL progress, fly, know the aircraft and mission. Become a PC. Track
    3 points
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