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  1. Today’s selection. I got Guns Babyyyyyy
    7 points
  2. Keep up with your logbook and triple check your CAFRS closeouts. I got lazy one year and lost a couple hundred hours of flight time because of it. Make sure you are clear with your HRC manager what your intentions are and what assignments you would like. You may or may not get it, but they don't know what you don't tell them. Keep an eye on their web page as well, often time there are oddball assignments posted there that you might be interested in. Take your EPs and IIMC training seriously. You will be faced with emergencies, and there's no telling which ones or when they will happen. Know them well, because the heat of the moment is the wrong time to be trying to recall EPs or floundering through an IIMC recovery. The most routine flights can end up being killers. Start working on your ARMS stuff as soon as you inherit an additional duty that needs it. Square that sh*t away and you wont have to work long hours in the weeks leading up to an inspection trying to catch everything up. Just about everything you will do has an applicable regulation or FM. Don't wait to "be trained" on something, just go start finding answers and asking questions. In line with the above, if you're giving someone an answer make sure to show them the source. If you can't recall where it came from, sit down and find it with them. It will sharpen you as well as give you credibility. That's the whole game as a Warrant Officer, and if you're an O-grade it will help build trust with the WOs you are leading. Lastly, enjoy where you're at. You worked hard to get there and you're doing something few people get to do. You wont be doing it forever and it's easy to lose sight of that when morale is low. A few years down the road you're going to forget most of the small stuff so try and focus on the big picture. Edit: As far as gear goes, best way to feel warm on a cold night is to keep the back of your neck covered.
    5 points
  3. Yeaaaaa I don’t buy that “cw2 is supposed to be an expert” stuff. A non tracked non PC CW2 is a liability because the rank has high expectations, but a 1LT fresh out of flight school isn’t? And if anyone tries explaining to me that 2 short years is what it takes for you to become a subject matter expert as a pilot…I must just be an idiot then because this job must not be hard at all. Again other branches seem to pull off the small gap between winging and promotion just fine. Any fighter pilot you’ve ever seen was close to o-3 by the time they got to their unit. Not to mention if O grades aren’t effected by this and neither are reserve and guard warrants…….if you don’t see where I’m going, those 3 groups make up maybe half of our flight community. So only half our aviators need to be seasoned before receiving a promotion? and let’s take this further then. Special forces Q course is also pretty long. The enlisted guys come in off the streets and 1.5 years later they are SGTs without any non Tradoc experience. Should those guys get similar treatment?
    5 points
  4. Recruiter just informed me that I was accepted. Huge relief after 2 years of building my packet
    5 points
  5. Congrats to the S2S applicants who got selected. Hopefully some favorable results for us on the AD side still playing the waiting game 😅💪
    4 points
  6. I guess they're just using this as a tactic to weed out the people that get overly anxious wait to hear the results lol.
    4 points
  7. Hey guys my recruiter gave me a call and informed me I was selected, second look.
    4 points
  8. Age: 31 Rank: Civilian GT: 135 SIFT: 69 OPAT: Heavy (APFT no longer required according to my recruiter) Education: Bachelors in Accounting - 3.0 GPA Physical: Stamped / Approved with waivers (minor surgeries) LOR: CW4 (160th) / College Professor / MLB Scouting Supervisor / College AD Deployment: none Other: 50 Flight Hours in R44 / about 20 of those PIC Selected this morning. Been working on my packet for 2+ years and I would be more than happy to help anyone here who needs or would like some guidance. I had a great mentor in the CW4 and I'll gladly pass along the knowledge.
    4 points
  9. I'm just here to tell you that if you don't select Apaches, have fun being a 🚌 driver
    3 points
  10. Posted in r/aviation thread: "Since there are very few facts presented by people commenting here are a few to digest. -The flight lead crew in the Apache for this flight was the Aviation Brigade Commander and Brigade Standardization Pilot. The boss everyone keeps saying is going to fry these guys was flying. -The flight was also approved on the military side at the General Officer level which included a briefing of the entire mission. • ⁠Extensive coordination occurred in the weeks and days leading up to this including direct coordination with the FAA. This included approval of all routes and altitudes to be flown during the ingress, flyover, and egress. Additionally there was an FAA representative located with military personnel in the stadium that maintained communication with the flight throughout the entire mission. At no time did any aircraft come near any cables or attempt to underfly them. The cables were attached to the bottom portion of the middle deck, creating a visual illusion when viewed from the ground that they were much closer than they actually were. • ⁠There was no formal complaint filed to the FAA, this is a direct response to irresponsible reporting by a local affiliate news station and further echoed by CNN. When presented with this the Military and FAA are both in a tough spot. Of course they are going to publicly say that they are reviewing the incident. Nothing is going to happen to these crews, the FAA review is scheduled to be completed next week. What will happen is the military is going to be extremely hesitant to participate in these events in the future. -Bottom line everyone can argue whether this was smart, but it was absolutely legal and approved at multiple levels by civilian and military coordinating agencies"
    3 points
  11. Got my email as well, hard to describe the feeling. See you guys down the road, PM me when you get class dates!
    3 points
  12. Score: 66 For my prep I got the 2020 SIFT study guide, watched all the videos from the Helicopter Lessons in 10 Minutes or Less YouTube channel, and did the Algebra section from Khan Acedemy to brush up on math. I took the test two weeks ago. I only got through 13 hidden figure questions and still managed a 66.
    3 points
  13. Only one way to find out.
    3 points
  14. Youre lucky its not worse…..classic blanket statement argument that can literally never, not be said no matter how much worse it gets. When the ten year ADSO was briefed to my class it was pitched that it was an attempt to make us equal with other branch’s flight programs. Admittedly im not effected by either the longer adso or rank reset but claiming thats the goal while paying your pilots so much less for so much cheaper training ends that argument right there. Added to which there is only one other branch with this long of an adso, no other branches that delay promotions….. also flight pay wasnt increased. While yea the numbers went up, an inflation rate vs flight pay increase will show it went down overall. i cannot comprehend people being upset over other people being upset about losing money, especially when there is no real tactical cause for this delay of promotion. Is it the end of the world? No but i think its more than fair to be upset that youre in a way basically getting an unexpected pay decrease
    3 points
  15. It refreshes HRC all day or else it gets the hose again… 😂
    3 points
  16. 3 points
  17. Recruiter just called to let me know I’ve been accepted! Looking forward to what’s next. Good luck to everyone!
    3 points
  18. Just got the call guys I'M IN!!! Unofficial for now but recruiter let me know what he found out... Stats earlier! Best of luck to all of you and will keep you posted on dates! Looking forward to see you at Mother Rucker!
    3 points
  19. Welcome back…… I run the Gallet LH250. My organization issued me the SPH-5 but I only wear it to remind myself how good the Gallet is…. I have quiet kit, CEP’s (molded earpieces), Zita liner, straight chord, NVG mount which was purchased from Marit Apparel…. Helmets seem to be a matter of; #1, cost, and #2, loyalty… Kinda-like the Ford/Chevy thing…. I tend to stick with the tried-and-true stuff. Stuff that has been worn in the field over a long period of time. The majority of pilots in my sector go with the Gallet… Comfort, lightweight and a narrow CG are the most common compliments. Most of them tell me; the other “newer” brands are “knock-offs” of established models. I’m not sure why anyone would gamble with knock-offs for head protection (not to say in this particular case the “other” helmets mentioned are in fact “knock-offs”). In motorcycle racing, the saying goes; if you believe your head is worth $150, then get a $150 helmet. The helmet I eventually purchased was $600-ish which wasn’t the highest price but was considered one of the top helmets for head protection... The LH350 looks interesting but since I haven’t been in the market for a new helmet, I don’t know much about it. From the info I’ve seen, it appears to be an upgraded LH250, although an “A” model which brings me back to the tried-and-true philosophy…..
    3 points
  20. Our Son Selected First Look May 2021 Street to Seat / High School to Flight School AGE: 17 ASVAB GT: 110 SIFT: 53 OPAT: Heavy EDUCATION: Graduates High School 29MAY2021 (this Saturday), 3.10 GPA FLIGHT: 78.8 hours, 19.6 hours solo/PIC, Airplane Single Engine Land (ASEL) Private Pilot’s License BOARD: May 2021 LORS: Aviation O-8, Aviation CW5, Aviation CW4, Aviation CW4, JROTC Instructor (Retired Artillery CW4), Michigan County Sheriff that has known my son and our family for 50 years OTHER INFO: 120 hours of volunteer service between three separate civic organizations, 3 Years JROTC PHYSICAL: Class 1A Physical, stamped I have the privilege of swearing him in at MEPS this Thursday...honored and obviously proud as hell!
    3 points
  21. I asked my recruiter about when the list would come out and he said “congrats”
    3 points
  22. Sounds about right, civilians don’t have CAC access to get onto the HRC website so the recruiter has to inform them. You should know by tomorrow. us AD schmucks will know next Friday lol
    3 points
  23. The WOSB MILPER message should come out next Friday (the 28th), Saturday the latest given that the 28th through 31st is a DONSA for Memorial Day. That was the same case for March's board. The WOSB MILPER message was published on a Saturday afternoon 1 week after the board, and that weekend was a DONSA as well.
    3 points
  24. Good luck, everyone...🤘🏻🤘🏻🙏🏻🙏🏻🇺🇸🇺🇸
    3 points
  25. Street to seat here, I just contracted and swore in. I ship out in July to BCT at Fort Leonard Wood then to WOCS in October.
    3 points
  26. Thank you for all the insights in this forum. It has been very helpful. I have been following the threads since September 2020 with 0 previous knowledge about this process/ program. I submitted for January 2021 but didn't get boarded because Recruiter and I couldn't submit corrections before USAREC corrections deadline. AGE : 32 (turning 33 next week) RANK : Civ (with previous military experience) GT : 128 SIFT : 55 OPAT: Heavy EDUCATION : BS Civ Engineering, 2.85 GPA. Working towards a Master's with 6 credits so far. PHYSICAL : Stamped LORs : O6 USAF Pilot Retired, O6 USMC Pilot Retired, 153D CW4 USAR , O5 USAF Retired /Faculty member/ Navigator, E9 USAF former NCO, Pastor/Friend/Supervisor NCOERs: N/A WAIVERS : None FLIGHT HOURS: None
    3 points
  27. Honestly can we get back on topic with the wonderful stories that actually promote aviation and not the irrelevant bullshit about bleed valves from 40 years ago.
    3 points
  28. Selected, second look. Congrats to the ones who made it and keep at it to the ones who did not!!
    3 points
  29. Got word that I was allegedly selected today. Major weight off my shoulders there.
    3 points
  30. Well I'll chime in with some MI fixed wing perspective. 1. Flight time. You live to deploy. You fly while deployed. The bulk of your hours usually come when you are deployed. When you're back home, you'll probably fly between 100% and 150% of your minimums. That equates to somewhere around 150 hours a year. Or like The Dude said, about 3 hours of flying a week. This need to deploy/high op tempo can stress a family out bad. Between all the TDY's, training exercises, gunnery, field work, and actual deployments, a lot of time is spent away from home. This obviously has a direct statistical correlation to divorce rates. Get your whole life ripped out from under you a time or two and you're bound to be bitter about it. 2. The other 40+ hours of your week. Well, this is going to vary wildly. It depends on your command climate, your air-frame, your fellow aviators/friends, your mission, your additional duty, how well you are liked, and what duty station you get, etc. I am pretty much in S6 for life. I love it. I wholeheartedly look forward to going in to work every day. I like the split between 2-3 flights a week and the rest spent dealing with tech issues and the rest of comm life. Other people see their additional duties as a means to an end, or a necessary evil in order to enjoy flying. Yeah, if I got stuck in ALSE, or TACOPS, or S1, I would definitely not enjoy it as much. Oh, and with all the rules, regulations, and additional craziness that the Army does, it definitely sucks some of the fun/relaxation/exhilaration out of the flying you do get to do. 3. Why warrants are so salty. Well, I have many theories on this, and they all apply some of the time in certain cases. Warrants were most often prior service of some kind. Many of them wanted forever to fly but a lot of them saw it as a means to stay in the military but instead of doing whatever crappy job they had before, they could serve out the remainder of their time doing something potentially fun (aka flying). They also like the idea that warrants are supposed to be able to get away with way more than a typical soldier should be able to. (It's every E4's dream to be able to skip PT, formations, etc at will, and have no adverse consequences). The reality is that there are two types of warrants, there are aviation warrants, and then there are tech warrants. Tech warrants are rare. They have a very specific skill set. A CW2 typically will only work with captains (O3's) and above. Company commanders, BN XO's, BN CDRs. A CW3 pretty much only deals with/reports to MAJ's and above (and is at a brigade level). CW4 forget about it if you aren't an O5. Combine that rarity with how that command structure works, and warrants get to do whatever they damn well please because everyone knows they know their lane inside and out and you don't want to piss them off. That is what most branches think warrants are. But then we have this little (fairly large) side of it that is aviation. You have 1LT's giving orders/being platoon leaders for CW2's and CW3's. 1SG's that key in on that and don't give aviators the same level of clout that they would as a tech warrant. You often have as many warrants in a flight company as you do lower enlisted (we have more). That 1LT who has no idea what they're doing is writing your OER as a CW3 with 14 years in the Army. That same LT is blowing up your phone because you aren't at PT or some dumb training meeting. Aviation warrants want to think they're tech warrants, but we aren't. We try oh so hard, but we are viewed in my opinion in many cases as flying privates. This makes a great deal of us salty as hell. 4. Next we have the pay issue (this applies much more to fixed wing than rotary, but it still applies to them as well). Warrant's get paid dirt compared to their commissioned counterparts. An equivalent time in grade CW3 and a CPT with the same amount of time in service, well, that CPT makes about 30k more a year when all is said and done. This happens, yet warrants are rooked/conned into doing many of the same jobs/same responsibilities as their commissioned counterparts. Warrants occasionally serve as platoon leaders, XO's, BN S1's, S6's, deputy commanders and even commanders of forward footprints. They want us to go to the same useless types of advanced courses that don't really give much college credit or hold any weight if you're trying to complete a bachelors degree (which all aviation warrants want if they want to eventually be airline pilots). Yes we are the only ones that qualify for the bonus, but that bonus barely brings us up to what our commissioned counterparts make normally, and we have to sign our lives away for 3 years. So, that explains that portion. 5. Ah yes, the degree portion. So, I'm going to get some nasty-grams and some hate for this, but here I go anyway. Warrants are cheap labor for aviation. The only way the Army can get away with this and still keep pilot applicants flooding in is the lack of a degree requirement. At the end of the day that's the only real difference, because the Air force has command track officers and technical track officers that only do flying related stuff. The Army could do the same thing, it would just cost a lot of money. Now for the part that will get me the hate mail. Aviation warrants as I've said are typically prior service. Most of the aviation warrants I've met that aren't street to seat have been in the military since they were 18-20 years old. They don't have an appreciation for how the real world works. They never went to a real college (no online BS doesn't count, you don't get exposed to new people, experiences, you bullshit your way though 50 forums and do some tests and poof there's a degree). They've never had to pay for civilian insurance, they've never had to worry about losing their job next week, they've never had to work in a group project with an LGBTQ Hindu snake whisperer, or worry about getting a raise, or stress about moving expenses (I get it, it can still be stressful but the military greatly reduces that with $$$), and they genuinely don't appreciate how shitty being a regional airline pilot actually is. They suffer from a severe, chronic case of grass is greener syndrome. This portion of their negativity you will just have to learn to get past or take lightly. The other things I've mentioned are valid complaints, but the lack of perspective is just something you'll have to deal with as a warrant officer in aviation. -The positives. I can't speak for my rotor-head brethren, but I can speak for MI fixed wing. We have tons of training opportunities, tuition assistance, the best education program offered in the world (GI Bill), spouse education benefits, bush pilot school, upset recovery, airborne, air assault, whatever dumb school you can think of, if you spin it right and talk to the right person, you can get it! You'll meet some of the best people and friends you could ever hope to find in the seat next to you, on deployments, sleeping in tents (or hotels ). You'll literally get millions of dollars of training, new life experiences, benefits, friends and a hell of an adrenaline rush. Your results may vary, everyone's journey is different. You could fly your 60 over a nude beach and have everyone cheer. You could get shot in the ass and have a nasty case of PTSD every time you sit down on the shitter and here a pop. You might fly a general in the back that writes you an LOR to a sweet gig at Boeing. You may get divorced after you walk in on your wife cheating on you with your best friend. Or you may go to experimental test pilot school and end up in NASA's astronaut program. There's probably a statistically relevant chance that you will have a negative experience in the Army as an aviator. The green weenie doesn't discriminate, but you can sure armor up with a positive attitude and good choices to at least lessen its wrath. Take the opportunity kid. Make the most of it. Give it what you have and don't let the negative nancy's beat you down. Just know it won't all be roses and rip its. PM me if you have any questions.
    3 points
  31. 135.243 c2 requires 75 hours of actual or simulated instrument, with at least 50 in an aircraft; so a cheap FTD won’t do you any good. If your intent is to fly SPIFR, you should do a year or two in the GOM to get some actual IFR experience. Not only to meet the 135 mins, but to become proficient. SPIFR isn’t something you should just jump into without a solid IFR background… Era (Bristow), PHI and RLC are all hiring. Depending on how desperate they are, it is possible to get hired directly into the S76 / AW139 as an SIC.
    2 points
  32. It's been a while since I saw it in the APL's, but I believe ADHD is a disqualifying condition unless you go through extra evaluations. I'm also 90% certain you can't be on any medication for it and be on flight status. Consult the Aeromedical Policy Letters. Should be public domain on google. I definitely wouldn't encourage lying at MEPS... But were you actually on medication for ADHD for an extended period of time? If not then I personally wouldn't consider it a "diagnosis." I should also add that MEPS and the Army will NOT get access to your medical records. The only people that tell you that are the ego-tripping dickwads at MEPS. HIPPA protects you, and even though you do technically sign away your protections on paper, it's still a bitch for them to get the records. However they may investigate if they have a reason to. (Such as issues found during the MEPS / Flight Physical.) My father was retired Army, and I had Tricare my whole life up to the point of joining. Even then they never pulled the records. It would have even been easy as a click of a button for them. Once again I'm not saying to lie, just don't self-eliminate. Someone else with experience with this waiver can chime in if they want.
    2 points
  33. With the same timing that I was offered the Apache? No, I would have left no matter what they were offering me. I had a new baby, an airline job offer, and an opportunity to move home. Easy choice. If I would have been allowed a fixed wing transition or CH-47 on the original go around? I don't know, but I can tell you I have no regrets about anything I have done. NTC... I'm not sure. Are you trying to get there as a UH-60 pilot or UH-72 pilot? OC? In context of the OC job. You're on the rotation schedule, so life is very predictable throughout the year. You know when you're going to have days off and when you're going to work 12 months in advance. You will be home every night or day, depending on which shift you're on. The one exception is being assigned bunker duty during live fire. A few nights in a bunk bed every few months. No big deal. You'll work for 3 straight weeks, no day off. Then you'll get a couple long weekends with easy work weeks and start all over. While I was there the mentality between rotations was show up, do whatever work you have, and get out of there as soon as you're done. The unit was small, and we didn't deal with stuff regular units had to. There was no range qualifications, very few formation runs, no endless classes, none of that. Just rotations, recovery, and preparing for the next rotation. We'd have a BBQ on every training day 14, as soon as the end of the rotation was announced and the birds were buttoned up. Families would come out, food would be on the table, and we'd hang out until dark celebrating. The flying was challenging. Flying solo NVG in red illumination, aircraft everywhere, ROZs and gun target lines during live fire with only a paper map and lat/long GPS, winds and turbulence in the mountains, dust landings, pinnacles, ridge lines you can't see in the dark, fast moving weather, confined areas, etc. It was not a place I would want to be a new aviator in, in fact some of the nights at NTC surpassed even Afghanistan in stress and difficulty. VERY different place than JRTC. But for all the crappy nights there were great days. The flying area is excellent, so much variety and everything is fair game. That's about all I can think to say about the flying without being asked more specific questions. When it comes to life outside of work it is what you make of it. You're going to want to live on post, because it's a 30 minute drive into the desert after leaving Barstow. There wasn't anything special about the base when it came to amenities, but I really enjoyed living there. The house I lived in was relatively nice and very close to the commissary. Plenty of long weekends to get off base and go visit some of the great destinations around SoCal.
    2 points
  34. You definitely want to have someone who knows you well. Aviators are great but if you just met them the LOR won’t be filled with years of personality and character. Someone who knows you will show a more complete picture of you, and is arguably a more reliable “witness” to your maturity, character, and abilities.
    2 points
  35. A lot to unpack in this question besides the kneeboard i posted earlier. My must haves: Finger Light Pen holder that velcros to the arm. Super handy, especially with the combat shirt Foreflight, with a badelf gps receiver or stratus. Yea i know they have built it GPS but that sh*t cuts out pretty often. Try flying with foreflight on your phone, good luck. Have Alse put a hear through on your helmet when you can Oregon aero hush kit. Whatever big bag you get to travel with, make sure it has wheels, waterproof helps. Gerber…youd be surprised how often you will use it Must knows: Show up with at least baseline knowledge. If you explain to me that airspace goes from A-G from the ground up based only on altitude, we’re off to a bad start. I expect you to know at least who you should be trying to talk to when flying, not being able to draw a diagram of the entire fuel system. If an IP asks you the “im a drop of oil” question. They most likely arent well liked by anyone. You will get additional duties, excel at them, they write your OER Be an asset not a liability. Dont be the guy we have to worry about getting drunk and doing dumb sh*t You’re reputation will follow you. Everyone knows everyone in aviation.
    2 points
  36. I made it this go around!! Second time applying, I’m wicked stoked!
    2 points
  37. First look select hearts about to explode 🤯
    2 points
  38. Cannot wait for next week, the wait really is exhausting. Does anyone know when the MILPER populates? I know it is usually the ~Wednesday following the board but is it issued the Monday after and posted that Wednesday?
    2 points
  39. This would mean part of the purchase cost would be paid on 1) day one of acquisition, 2) part at end of year one after acquisition and 3) part at end of year two. The two deferred payments to possibly vary against an agreed metric such as EBITDA remaining at level of day one. This makes sure the seller isn't handing you a "dud"
    2 points
  40. If you are in the USA stick with your heli job and get yourself as close to ATP mins as you can. Look it up in part 61 and do your best to get that flight time. There’s a strong possibility the regional airlines will start back up the rotor transitions and you can apply and get them to help with your training costs, and get your foot in the door to the fixed wing world.
    2 points
  41. Lots of air into the cockpit, like having no windshield on the freeway but worse. One person can fly. Why is it about to crash? That’s going to determine how “gently” it goes into the sea. But for drama’s sake you can assume it’s going to be pretty violent. If the blades contact the water the impact forces will essentially rip the aircraft apart. This isn’t a Sea King but the video captures both scenarios. The first being a relatively controlled landing after an engine failure (still pretty hard landing, eh?), and the second is a blade strike: Note that the helicopter rolls over and starts to sink. Almost guaranteed to happen in a bad water crash. The pilot will not have a lot of time to get out of the aircraft, seconds.
    2 points
  42. If I see your son there I'll be sure to hello! I'm sure he'll be easy to spot due to age lol!
    2 points
  43. Me too brother, congratulations - see you there!
    2 points
  44. I would look at Grand Canyon tour operators. Lots of pilots with your hours have built a lot of time quickly doing this.
    2 points
  45. I made it boys! My stats are earlier in this thread!
    2 points
  46. Thank you so much, and sure, Age: 18 Flight Physical: Stamped, No Waivers RANK: Civ GT: 130 AFQT: 93 SIFT: 58 Flight Hours: 5 Rotary Wing, PPL course ACFT/OPAT: No ACFT taken for S2S, Heavy on OPAT Education: High School Diploma With High Honors 3.86, Technical School for EMT, Deferred enrollment for University LORS: Fire Captain, Fire Chief, CW4 Pilot, EMS Pilot & (RET.) CW2 Pilot and Ft. Rucker Flight Instructor, Family Friend, Flight IP from flight school Prior Service: None after my first look I updated my resume, gained a couple flight hours and reached out to my local guard unit, and they were a big help.
    2 points
  47. That's showing the very basic level of knowledge. It's a bleed valve, cool. It's there, intact, basic level preflight check complete. What does it do, how does it work, what happens if it doesn't work, how will you know, what emergency does/can it cause, cockpit indications, pilot response, what other systems will be effected/lost, etc....that's the important stuff that no one will know at the flight school experience level.
    2 points
  48. Would you mind posting your stats? Also, there is a forum on the general military section where selected members post their stats to give future WOFT program applicants some insight to the stats behind those whom were selected.
    2 points
  49. I’m on for this board too. Age: 18 ASVAB: 85, GT 118 SIFT: 52 Education: high school diploma, private pilots ground school Flight Physical: stamped, no waivers APFT: 253 Flight Hours: None LORs: Retired CW4, ground school instructor, and teacher. Good Luck everyone. Hope we can all get selected.
    2 points
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