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helojim39

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About helojim39

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  1. To everyone who responded earlier to "Helo ag school": I have tried for almost two years to get an established flight school to partner with me in offering a helicopter agricultural flight training course but nobody seems to be interested. It's a shame because I really believe that there is a shortage of ag pilots. If anyone is still interested, drop me an email at; helojim39@gmail.com and I'll try to help you as much as possile. Good luck everybody and fly safe
  2. That's what they said about the Hiller 12E, But now I hear it's been sold to a firm in China, so we should be able to buy one at Walmart in a couple of years.
  3. Most Bell 47G5's use the -23(long weighted metal) blades which are used on many 47 models. Take the weight out and they become -21's. I've also heard that Bell has jacked up the price of 206 blades and Oh58 blades are becoming hard to find and pretty pricey. I don't think Bell wants to support any of these older machines particularly 47's and ex-military (Hweys & Oh58's).
  4. This topic was accidently put in the wrong category. A friend of mine, who is a helicopter mechanic, recently told me that the price of a new main rotor blade for a 47G5 is $179,500 each from Bell. And tail rotor blades are $10,000 each. If this is true, and my friend is usually "right on", I don't see how anyone can afford to operate a 47 and it is still probably the most commonly used helicopter for agricultural spraying, followed by 206's and OH58's. I can't see the R44 Robinson becoming a viable replacement for the 47 but I guess time will tell.
  5. A friend of mine, who is a helicopter mechanic, recently told me that the price of a new main rotor blade for a 47G5 is $179,500 each from Bell. And tail rotor blades are $10,000 each. If this is true, and my friend is usually "right on", I don't see how anyone can afford to operate a 47 and it is still probably the most commonly used helicopter for agricultural spraying, followed by 206's and OH58's. I can't see the R44 Robinson becoming a viable replacement for the 47 but I guess time will tell.
  6. I just received a personal message from Rotormandan and I'm too old and stupid to figure out how to reply other than by email so any of you that have questions about ag flying need to leave me an email address or a phone number
  7. I just received a personal message from Rotormandan and I'm too old and stupid to figure out how to reply other than by email so any of you that have questions about ag flying need to leave me an email address or a phone number
  8. Saw them in Trade A Plane. Three in the last 2 months.
  9. I see that there are two "Helicopter ag pilot wanted" advertisements currently in T-A-P, and one more prior to those two. It just proves that there is a lack of ag helo pilots. I've tried to get some existing helicopter flight schools interested in an ag pilot course, but no takers.
  10. It sounds like you're in Hawaii. Howzit was the give away. I spent two years there myself flying ag for Murrayaire. Bad equipment, fun job.
  11. I just looked at Applebee's web site and if anybody out there thinks you can learn enough to become a working ag helicopter pilot, much less get a job with 3 hours of flight instruction and 10 hours ground instruction probably isn't smart enough to be an ag pilot. However, if you have $4000 you want to throw away, I wish you luck.
  12. I saw this on another wed site and thought it very true: Lawrence Livermore Laboratories has discovered the heaviest element yet known to science. The newly defined element , Governmentium (symbol = Gv), has one neutron, 25 assistant neutrons, 88 deputy neutrons, and 198 assistant deputy neutrons, giving it an atomic mass of 312. These 312 particles are held together by forces called morons, which are surrounded by vast quantities of lepton-like particles called peons. Since Governmentium has no electrons, it is inert. However, it can be detected, because it impedes every reaction with which it comes into contact. A tiny amount of Governmentium can cause a reaction that would normally take less than a second, to take from 4 days to 4 years or more. Governmentium has a normal half-life of 2 to 6 years. It does not decay, but instead undergoes a reorganization in which a portion of the assistant neutrons and deputy neutrons exchange places. In fact , Governmentium's mass has been observed to actually increase over time, since each reorganization will cause more morons to become neutrons, forming isodopes. This characteristic of moron promotion leads some scientists to believe that Governmentium is formed whenever morons reach a critical concentration. This hypothetical quantity is referred to as critical morass. When catalyzed with money, Governmentium becomes Adminisratium (symbol = Ad), an element that radiates just as much energy as Governmentium, since it has half as many peons but twice as many morons. One of the many indicators you are dealing with this element is the fact that it is referred to by an acronym instead of by name.
  13. Your question “Is it better to start young because of better reflexes?” is a difficult one to answer since youth frequently comes with a “nothing can hurt me” attitude. This also goes toward answering your other question about whether ag flying is significantly more dangerous than other types of flying. Personally, I don’t think ag flying is any more dangerous than most other forms of aviation providing an individual gets the proper training and supervision. Approached with the right attitude, a career in agricultural aviation can be very rewarding.
  14. There is no easy way to break into the ag business and one of the greatest obstacles are the insurance companies. I'm currently working with an aeronautical university to develop an ag course and one of the things we hope to do is to get the insurance companies to sign off on students who have successfully completed the course. It won't be a quick course or a cheap one, but hopefully one that will keep an apprentice pilot out of trouble and alive. I'm a 33,000+ hour ag pilot and I'm pretty respected in the areas where I've worked and I hope to help worthy students get their foot in the door. I'm sure that we will be advertising on this website and others once our program is ready to go .
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