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Hobie

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Hobie last won the day on August 30 2019

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  1. Ok. Got it. Another way to think about this is that if the guy is renovating an old property, and has the $ for a helo, maybe he will be pulling up the property values of the neighborhood. I wouldn't expect he will be making multiple flights per day, occasionally enjoying the lake just the same as the neighbors. I bet if you asked for daylight flights only, he would be receptive. You guys might even get free rides now and then Personally, I wouldn't object to the medical flights. You never know when you might need that service. YMMV.
  2. I'm confused. So they guy who met neighbors with wine was the Mayo pilot? And he attended a city council meeting too? How many flights per day are we talking?
  3. I hope that there is not that many trauma injuries happening in you local surrounds! I wouldn't think that the occasional medical helicopter flight will prompt a flurry of new helo activity especially landing on hospital roof and with an airport so nearby. Your initial post indicated safety. Those pilots flying medical are among the best and the helos are very well maintained.
  4. Sounds like this may be a trauma center. Are they currently landing on their own hospital property? Just how many flights per week would you estimate? If so, very different situation vs. a private owner wanting to fly out of his backyard.
  5. This is more specific for plank pilots but the concepts are same. The highlighted last sentence should be the pilots only factor to decide continue flight. from: https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2017/september/pilot/scud-running To discourage scud running, the aviation division of Transport Canada once asked pilots to contemplate these questions: How much airspeed is lost when a pilot rapidly rolls into and holds a 45-degree banked turn? How much room is needed to make a 180-degree turn? How much additional space is required if turning from the upwind side of a valley to the downwind side? How far away can a pilot see a wire? How much distance is flown from the time a pilot first sees a wire strung across his flight path until he can react and begin a climb? How prepared is a pilot to cope with a fuel tank running dry or having an engine fail at very low altitude? Can your windshield withstand hitting a two-pound bird? Do you still feel like flying at low altitude in limited visibility? Other questions might include: Does a scud-running pilot always know his position? Does he know the location and height of all nearby obstructions? If conditions worsen, is he prepared to declare an emergency and climb into the overcast? If unable to fly on instruments, is the pilot prepared to make an emergency, off-airport landing? If a scud-running pilot has passengers on board, what right does he have to expose them to such hazard?
  6. My kid is planning on going heliskiing in Canada this March. He is an accomplished skier and good with powder. He has never done heliskiing before. Any hot tips from anyone who flies these tours ? Of course, he *knows* to tip the pilot ;). He is incredibly looking forward to this and will have 2 other buddies. I'm guessing all of the pilots are quite skilled so I'm not really asking about any particular operator. Huge thanks for any input. H
  7. Here is an article in the Wall Street Journal summarizing each of their delivery drones. https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-drones-are-coming-11571995806 They have been given permission by the FAA and they fly about 100-400 feet. Right now they are very limited in range up to about ~5 miles from launch. But, in time I expect to see the sky full of these making deliveries. There is no air-to-air communication/detection for collision avoidance so FAA has limited only one operator per a certain area. The obvious concern is not that they are taking pilots jobs but encroaching into helicopter airspace creating more flying obstacles to avoid. What I am really hoping for is these companies are very well funded and they will have to pour a lot of money into developing technologies that can cross over into normal helo cockpits to increase safety. 1. First would be wire strike detection. 2. Next would be cheap on board ident that would communicate automatically to surrounding ships both drones and helos their own speed, altitude, course direction, maybe even flight plans. What is the helo industry doing to prepare for this onslaught of drones?
  8. In the short term this operator may think he is getting a good deal using a cheap pilot. I wonder out loud that the pilot knows he is being taken advantage of and may not be treating the equipment as well as it needs to be nor being 100% committed to the job task. What I mean is he may not be 100% focused on situational awareness and may become sloppy, complacent, etc, possibly contributing to a crash. Like the videos we have seen with the pilot fueling while boarding pax, coming in low and hot, etc.
  9. Learned something today. Thanks iChris!!
  10. Nothing in my words indicate nor suggest gender. Yes, you are right bad habits can occur in all people. It is too bad our politically correct culture has so much infiltrated our perception or filter of reality. Often gender has no bearing to the actions or is part of an issue, but becomes the major focus of a story. Our left leaning politicians and our press seem to be particularity guilty of this.
  11. The first video posted in this thread was dated 2016. I believe this Ntsb report refers to the same pilot and subsequent crash in 2018. Keep that in mind while viewing the first video and the original comments by NR. Bad habits do have consequences.
  12. What a cool grampa to have!! Kid's lucky!
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