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MurderedOutTaco

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About MurderedOutTaco

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  1. Wow, what a beautiful video! I thought I was intimately familiar with the entire coastline of the DR but I don't recognize the sea cliffs at 1:40. I'd like to know where that is! Thanks for posting!
  2. Makes complete sense. I have definitely seen a few guys jerking their helicopters around though when lowering a load into a confined site (a few guys up in SE AK and one guy down here in WA). I've seen it often enough that I thought it was an actual intentional technique to nudge the load or cancel out swing, hence my original post. But like you alluded to, I have also seen super smooth pilots. Seems like smoother would be a lot easier on the helicopter too. The Lama in that saw video I posted must get worked getting flown like that all the time. I daydream of learning how to long line on almost a daily basis.
  3. Actually this is a much better example, while not a longline (skip to the 2:30 mark): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8P239RmfoSY
  4. Makes sense Whistlerpilot. I just wonder why some pilots seem to do this jerking around intentionally. This is kind of an example (skip to the 1:00 mark) of what I'm referring to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyyUu_oHXo8
  5. I'm a commercial student pilot and I'm fascinated by external load/long line ops and hope to do that sort of work someday. I've noticed that a lot of guys (and gals) tend to jerk the ship around when placing or controlling a load (particularly a precision job like assembling a core drill or something). Is there a term for this technique? I assume it's basically a fine-tune manipulation of the load by trying to cancel out the pendulum swing of a load? I've also seen the opposite, where the pilot is very smooth on the controls and there is no excess movement. Are there two schools of thought on this? If anyone could provide some more insight about this stuff or provide some resources for reading up on it, I'd soak it up like a sponge!
  6. According to the BLS, most helicopter pilots are rich: "According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average salary of a Helicopter Pilot is $111,680 annually. However, mid-range Helicopter Pilot salaries range from $81,580 to $150,480. The lowest-earning Helicopter Pilots make less than $32,020, while the highest-paid ones earn more than $129,580" $111,680 is the AVERAGE? I would have said about half that. How do they come up with such kooky stats?
  7. Thank you all for the feedback and discussion -- there has been a lot of interesting perspective brought to the table, and I appreciate every nugget of insight that has been shared. I don't need a "pep talk" as one poster suggested, I simply wanted to sample from a population of experienced professionals some opinions about what the perception of career success is. I'm considering this as a major career change at a crux point of my life, and I want to do as much homework as I can to hedge my bets in the most prudent possible way. P.s., for those who mentioned that I should go to college instead, I have multiple degrees in the field in which I currently make my living (unrelated to aviation). However my current occupation doesn't exactly give me that warm fuzzy feeling to get out of bed and go to work every day.
  8. I realize that getting all your certificates and ratings is just the first step in a career as a professional pilot, and that there is no guarantee of getting hired once you have accumulated minimum flight experience requirements necessary for employment. But what is the actual risk? In reality, how many folks go through all the time and expense of training, and then are unable to find work? Is it common? Or not so much? And I guess my question applies to both getting that first CFI job, and also getting that first turbine job after being a CFI for a few years. I'm sure this is a vague inquiry, but I'm just trying to get a sense of how common (or not) it is for folks to have spent all the time and money they don't have only to have it end at a roadblock. I keep hearing people say "there's no guarantee of getting a job once you have gone thru the training" and, understandably, it makes me a bit nervous. What do you experienced folks think?
  9. Thanks Gomer and Wally for the explanation and for the Cat A/OEI graphic. Makes complete sense to me now. So much to learn...
  10. I'm a student commercial pilot, sorry if this is a dumb question: I have watched a number of HEMS videos on youtube in which the pilot makes a backwards takeoff from the pick up point. I assume there is some function for this, other than to impress observers on the ground? Why not 180 at hover height and then takeoff with a max P forward profile? In most of the videos I have seen there is plenty of room for maneuvering at hover height (i.e., football field, etc). Also, I assume this is only done in multiengine aircraft?
  11. I'm a student commercial pilot, sorry if this is a dumb question: I have watched a number of HEMS videos on youtube in which the pilot makes a backwards takeoff from the pick up point. I assume there is some function for this, other than to impress observers on the ground? Why not 180 at hover height and then takeoff with a max P forward profile? In most of the videos I have seen there is plenty of room for maneuvering at hover height (i.e., football field, etc). Also, I assume this is only done in multiengine aircraft?
  12. I was talking to a pilot lately who recommended that I try to do my commercial training in a 44 rather than a 22 if I can afford it. I can't really afford any training, but I'm doing it anyway, so what's another $5K? My flight school does 44's by collective time and 22's by hobbs time, so for flights in the 1.2 to 1.3 range the price difference over the course of a "normal" commercial course is about $5K all told. Is it worth the extra cost? Will it be a significant feather in my cap?
  13. I agree with UH60L-IP's post. I would guess that in most cases a relatively small percentage of students make it to the point of applying for a CFI job. As an instructor, you will have a lot of intro flight one hit wonders walking thru the door, you will have some who want to just get one certificate or rating, some who will get discouraged or break their bank account part way thru their training, etc, etc. You don't "need" 6 students who go from 0 to CFI in order to have an attractive resume. Insofar as to how to build time other than instructing, it will always be to your benefit to get an instructor job at an outfit that also uses their instructors to fly tours in piston powered equipment. My instructor probably instructs in 22's 40% of the time and flies tours in 44's the remaining 60%. Those tour hours can take up a lot of slack in building time, and also doesn't hurt the resume to have tour experience, especially considering your first turbine job has a decent likelihood of flying tours.
  14. A friend of mine in the pipeline industry out east needs to have a 6000 lbs drill dropped at a site near Binghamton. He asked me if I knew of an outfit with a helicopter big enough for the job, and I'm not familiar with any operators out that way. Anyone have any recommendations?
  15. This is exactly what I've been trying to do intentionally over my last couple of lessons. Those damn set downs have probably been the hardest thing for me. Usually what happens is I will start with a nice stabilized 5 ft hover and then the instant I think about setting down everything goes to s***. I start having anxiety about going sideways or backwards, which, of course, CAUSES me to go sideways and backwards, then I try to set down anyway and panic at the last inch above the ground because I'm going sideways/backwards and pull back into a wobbly hover, then I'm gripped and wobbling all over the place after that. I often have to fly a mini rectangle pattern over the practice pad just to shake it off, take a deep breath, and get stabilized again. I think if I do what you suggest and just try to make sliding it on forwards the default for now, it will reduce the nerves a bit and will help me learn proper set downs more easily in the long run.
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