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JDHelicopterPilot

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JDHelicopterPilot last won the day on October 25 2013

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About JDHelicopterPilot

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  • Birthday 02/07/1980

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    REACH Air Medical EMS (Instructor Pilot) FAA Safety Team Representitive (OAK FSDO)

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    Concord,CA
  1. Required to for part 135 operations. Always do other times as well. Put it this way, if you have a violation and the FAA determines that if you had a chart onboard that would have given you the information needed to prevent said violation, it won't be pretty. As for EFBs replacing paper documents. Part 135 requires an additional approved OpSpec, GOM revisions, training and a 6 month testing period. You will be required to keep two EFBs on board in case one fails. If you only have one as normal procedure, paper documents must still be carried.
  2. Don't forget! The FAASTEAM seminar starts at 1500 on Saturday. I hope everyone attends. It is going to be a great one. New topics and a new speaker this year as Randy Mains will be joining us. See you all there!
  3. Another year is here for Heli-Success and the FAA Safety Team is back! Again on Saturday starting at 1500 will be our annual safety seminar sponsored by RPM Network and many more. I hope you all can attend as this year we have shaken things up! New topics, new presenters are sure to make it worth your time. Following the seminar is a meet and greet. Don't just attend the meet and greet, join us for the afternoon. Speakers are: Jason Dykstra: FAA Safety Team Representative, EC135 SPIFR Instructor Pilot for REACH Air Medical. Randy Mains: A pilot with over 13,000 hours and 44 years in the industry. Randy is a Pilot Examiner and CRM/AMRM Instructor Randy Rowles: Mr. Rowles has dedicated his career in the industry as a Pilot Examiner, Gold Seal CFII and Master CFI. We will be bring forth new topics and this will be a fun and exciting event.
  4. Another year is here for Heli-Success and the FAA Safety Team is back! Again on Saturday starting at 1500 will be our annual safety seminar sponsored by RPM Network and many more. I hope you all can attend as this year we have shaken things up! New topics, new presenters are sure to make it worth your time. Following the seminar is a meet and greet. Don't just attend the meet and greet, join us for the afternoon. Speakers are: Jason Dykstra: FAA Safety Team Representative, EC135 SPIFR Instructor Pilot for REACH Air Medical. Randy Mains: A pilot with over 13,000 hours and 44 years in the industry. Randy is a Pilot Examiner and CRM/AMRM Instructor Randy Rowles: Mr. Rowles has dedicated his career in the industry as a Pilot Examiner, Gold Seal CFII and Master CFI. We will be bring forth new topics and this will be a fun and exciting event.
  5. Yes, it is a B3. It also has the throttle on the collective.
  6. I am not at the least bit surprised. Neither is the NTSB. The FAA will get to it but that will be years down the road. I am glad my company sends its pilots to the factory for full down autos.
  7. Most HEMS operators have been doing this testing already. In fact most HEMS operators already adhere to the vast majority of what is listed in the final rule. The Final rule will affect other Part 135 and Part 91 operations the most. For HEMS the biggest changes for many operators will be the inclusion of flight data recorder in the aircraft. Also, dispatch centers or a operational control center will affect some operators. My company has already been working on all aspects of the final rule requirements that we don't already have for some time. The FAA is just catching up with the industry. Look at it this way, they are not wasting time mandating NVGs because it is already the industry standard. My feeling is the final rule is addressing sound issues but issues of the past in some respects. In recent years the leading causes of accidents in all of the Helicopter Industry has been maintenance related. Either poor maintenance procedures, parts failure. Engine failures of many sorts was near the top of that list. Combine this with poor autorotation training in the "commercial" world has led to many poor outcomes. The FAA needs to address maintenance procedures and we need to stop having line pilots conduct maintenance test flights unless properly trained.
  8. I agree with Gomer. The flight volume will still be unchanged.
  9. Never an issue. If you must go it is not a problem to do so before you take off. But again, most legs are less than an hour. At which point I can head into the hospital if needed.
  10. The 109a is not faster. In fact the A119k and Ke are faster than the 109a. I have flown each. My company is retiring the A109a and have taken delivery of three EC135P2+ aircraft. I can tell you that they were very maintenance heavy due to their age. A lot of electrical problems, the rotor head always required oil of course. Just a lot of maintenance down time. We now are down for un scheduled MX almost never. Very nice.
  11. EuroCopter made temp changes to the RFM. In short, they added a note to the Emergency Procedures to remind the pilot to not ignor the warning light despite fuel level indication. There is a reason why the caution and warning lights are independent.
  12. A lot of twin drivers don't do auto-rotations as part of their training. This is more common that you may think or I agree with. EuroCopter has been notified by Bond (operator in Europe ) of a problem with the EC135 supply tank fuel indicator not displaying proper fuel level. This is a concern. There is now a check for operators to complete to verify the supply tank probes are working properly. Bond discovered problems with two of their EC135s. Right now EuroCopter is not saying this is related to the accident. The result of this problem is the fuel caution and warning lights may come on when not expected but should be followed as per the checklist despite the fuel indication. It should also be noted, with the main tank empty and supply tanks full, there is just under 30 min fuel remaining. Thus, most pilots will not fly into that and will not use the fuel in the supply tanks. I for one will allow my main to run dry but will use ALL of my supply fuel as reserve fuel even though there is more than 20 min. To me it makes sense as an added safety buffer but also makes fuel planning a little easier.
  13. I flew the F28F also, the best auto rotating helicopter I have flown.
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