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bossman

VIP Member
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    408
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10 Good

About bossman

  • Rank
    VR Veteran Poster
  • Birthday 03/18/1950

Previous Fields

  • Company working for
    MARPAT Aviation

Contact Methods

  • AIM
    mholb61526@aol.com
  • Website URL
    http://www.marpathelicopters.com
  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    West Virginia====USA
  • Interests
    Helicopters and keeping people interested in them.
  1. 1962 UH-1B, in Viet Nam from 62 to 71. Rolled over 3 times in Nam. Back to the states, did grape spraying in CA, became a movie star (Die Hard, The Rock, Outbreak, China Beach, Under Seige, and more). Bought her and flew her to WV in 2002. She now does the fire fighting for the entire state of WV and attends many fairs and festivals as a tribute to the men and women of the Viet Nam era. N98F.
  2. Glad to see you "old guys" are still around. Been pretty busy. How goes it?
  3. Yea, the 1100 we had went to Texas. Parts were becoming an issue. Working the machine was racking up too much time, sold it to a private owner.
  4. The FH1100 was a good helicopter. It just had no support.
  5. With the Hiller, as is with most small receip helicopters, anything can cause the tail to shake. What you need to look for is; is it a side to side shake, or an up and down shake. Tail rotor problems are most often felt in the peddals as a high frequency. The way that the "bump" was described, would lead me to believe that it is a main rotor or head problem. Could be wrong, but after sitting for two years grease tends to break down. I would totally disassemble the head, swash plate, grips, etc. and re pack all bearings. Do not take a chance and let the problem escalate. Another thing to look at would be, what kind of dampers does it have? If they are the oil filled type make sure the oil levels are equal. You'd be surprised at how much difference 6 ounces of oil makes. Remember that when you track and balance you deal with adding a washer here or there, so a difference in oil levels and amount of grease has a great effect.
  6. Totally clean the head. Remove all old grease and re grease with the same ammount of pumps in all fittings. Check the blades and make sure the end caps and weights are still there and that something has not built a nest somewhere. More than likely, it is the grease in the head and grips. After sitting tied down at an angle, the grease tends to settle to one side. Depending on the type grease used when you parked the helicopter.
  7. I think this statement holds a lot of truth. You guys that have the Huey on your list, come to West Virginia, put some fuel in the old gal, and we will take it around the patch. One of the few UH-1Bs still flying everyday and earning a living fighting fire here in West Virginia. Of course it will have to be crew training since it is in restricted category.
  8. Everyone that flies a helicopter does not do it for a job. Some do it for the "love of flying". When it becomes just a job, the thrill is gone and it is time to move on. Being able to fly a helicopter, airplane, or operate any type of equipment is something to be proud of. To make a machine perform to it's specifications is something not everyone can do, and when it is all said and done, a helicopter is just a machine and it will only do what you allow it to do. I'll put our 400 hour PPLs up against any CPL with 400 hours and a CFI flying around the airport with students or taking pictures of boats. I guarantee you that my PPLs have done more off airport, different situations, high recons, low recons, and real world flying than most CFIs. I know they have flown a greater variety of helicopters. So, I totally disagree with Boatpix's view of the PPLs and their abilities. I agree that the money to be made from renting an aircraft to qualified PPLs does not come near to paying the insurance premium, but seeing the pride and joy felt by the pilot and their passengers goes a long way toward making it all worthwhile. Not everyone is in this for the money. Some of us enjoy going to the airport.
  9. All my pilots are allowed to use the helicopters for flying any of their family members. They do not become pilots in our organization until we know and trust them. Anyone going through our course can rent our machines for non-commercial activities. We would not sign them off for a check ride if we did not trust them to do the right thing. The statement about not allowing any PPL(H) to take a friend for a ride is a bit out there. This must be some kind of an insurance thing and your insurance company must not trust your judgement. You need to remove the PPL rating from your cost structure and teach only rated pilots your superior knowledge, so they can become a picture taking R22 driver with a commercial license. By the way, my pilots only pay for fuel when they use the helicopters for their family. $106.25 per hour for the FH1100. $361.25 per hour for the Huey. $212.50 for the BO105. Yes, all our pilots are trained to fly all our helicopters.
  10. The marpataviation.com site is going to have to have another host and server. The person that was taking care of the hosting has retired. That's why we got the marpathelicopters.com, up and running. The Alouette issue is still in the courts. It is supposed to go to trial in Charleston, West Virginia, in March. That is unless the FAA delays for some other reason. They have, I think, depleted all their delays. We'll see.
  11. apiaguy, How much you paying for fuel, insurance, hangar, maintenance, utilities, pilots, workers comp, unemployment, FICA, social security, medicade, mobile phones, cleaning supplies, credit cards, automobiles, housing, and a lot of other things I can't think of right now. All this and more must be supported by the aircraft or aircrafts. It's a tough old world out there. Oh, I forgot about all the federal, state, and local taxes.
  12. We urge people wanting to get into aviation, to go ahead and get their private fixed wing first, and then do the helicopter add on. We do a lot of helicopter add ons. The folks that do the add on are more comfortable in the air and already know the basics for navigation, radio, and general knowledge. We find that in almost every case we can do the sign off for the ride in about 25 hours. We've done a lot in 20 hours. You can get the private fixed wing for about $8,000.00 and add the helicopter for another $8,000.00. You now have $16,000.00 in a private rating and are qualified for the fixed wing or the helicopter. If you go the strictly helicopter route you've got around $16,000.00 in a private helicopter license. By the way, we do both fixed wing and helicopter training, it opens up a lot more options.
  13. Come to West Virginia and we will help you all we can in our B model.
  14. Me thinks that this thread has exposed a few nerves and raw ends. Trans Lift, man you are starting to piss me off if your thicker comment is directed toward fat boys, I fall into that category. I have been in and seen more countries than you can count, all of them contain fat boys. You know, I base my helicopter purchases upon them being "fat boy friendly". adam32, you can't win a discussion with someone that has a deep seated resentment against fat boys. He probably eats salads and green stuff. Happy 4th. of July. "God Bless The USA"
  15. I think this country is very special. If you do not feel the same way, maybe you should think about moving on.
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