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ADRidge

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ADRidge last won the day on April 26 2012

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About ADRidge

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    VR Veteran Poster
  • Birthday March 28

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    Contract Pilot

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    Male
  • Location
    Texas, Y'all
  • Interests
    skeet shooting, dove hunting, aviation, travel, history, all kinds of stuff.
  1. Jess, as Goldy said, everyone's story is different. My answers to your questions... #1. it took me exactly 63 days from my CFI check ride to my first revenue flight. That being said, I know guys who have been looking for five years. How long it takes you to get that first job (if ever) depends on how well you network. You can never have enough friends in this industry. That's actually the only reason I got the job I have. #2. Save your money. There's another discussion about this going on, but I'm of the opinion that the few grand you'd spend on a transition could be better used to get an SFAR sign-off or some full-down autorotation practice or something else cool. #3. From what I've heard that's pretty much right. The GOM companies, and most others now, seem to want you to be ATP ready... 1500 hours rotor, 100 night, whatever else. #4. What makes a successful pilot? Well, of the few I know personally, every single one of them continues to learn every single day. Whether it's pursuing the details of the FAR's, aerodynamics or the finer points of actually operating an aircraft, they're learning. They're also can-do guys who try their best to maintain a good attitude. Those are the high points that I can think of off the top of my head.
  2. I say pick whichever aviation discipline is more likely to get you a job. Once you have a flying gig, you can always get a transition. What are YOUR realistic employment opportunities with a FW CFII and a bachelors?
  3. One thing I'd like to add as a relatively new guy out working his first job... I guess some would say I got lucky and got a job within two months of getting my CFI. I'm working in South Texas for a small company, and we do pretty much everything you can do with an R-44 and still be within the limits of Part 91. Being a working helicopter pilot is damn hard. I've driven 1900 miles in two days to relocate a helicopter on a trailer to a job site, and I'll be in the ship or on 15-minute standby for the next 45-50 days. I got lucky and have a boss that appreciates my hard work, but I'd say the physical effort that goes into utility work can be almost as much as working construction or any other manual labor. Sorry for the disjointed post, I just got to the hotel and I'm worn out.
  4. If you know for sure that A) your school will hire you and that you want to fly helicopters, I say the choice is clear. If you want to try your chances at fixed-wing, go the other route. I don't know for sure, but I'd imagine fixed-wing is much more saturated than helicopters. I'd post a longer reply, but I've been driving for 15 hours.
  5. I teach, in a nutshell, that form= profile+ skin. Parasite is totally diff. The only reason skin gets brought up is that there is no such thing as a perfectly smooth material from which an airfoil may be made. Profile is the height, basically, of the leading edge and with simple examples will show how much harder it is to move a huge wing through the air than a thin one. Parasite is any drag created by a non-aerodynamic surface. Pitch links, skids, doorknobs, etc. Sorry for the short weird post... On the iPhone.
  6. This. I'm pursuing a degree on my downtime that has nothing to do with flying. I could maybe get a management job in an aviation company with it, but I mainly got it just to say I have it.
  7. I took a fun flight not too long ago in a -22, and had a blast. Well, it was technically knocking the rust off for my -22 SFAR sign off, but it was a BLAST. I like its tail rotor compared to the 300, and I like that it's a little twitchier. If it had better rotor inertia, it'd be an amazing helicopter. As is it's a pretty cool helicopter, and the 300 isn't far behind it.
  8. That's something I've been thinking about more and more lately. I'm not really a people person, at least I don't think so, but get a few pax in my heli and I'm chatty as all get-out. I've been doing a bunch of rides lately. One weekend I made 150 landings doing five mile rides. Not exactly tours, but long enough to chat with everyone I took up. It's a real hoot, or can be anyway, when you get a bunch of people who have never been in a helicopter before and who may have never been airborne before. Honestly with that type of flying it's the only thing that breaks up the monotony. I could definitely see myself flying a bunch of folks over the Grand Canyon or something someday. Problem is, I just don't want to limit myself to the constraints of the poll. I want to do just about everything.
  9. What I've been told is that their official requirements are fairly low... 1500 or so, but that they're being incredibly selective. Remember, you're also competing with guys who have had their fill of deployments and want to go back to Rucker to instruct. Both guys I know didn't even get a phone call until they had about 2-3k.
  10. I've got two former instructors who work at Rucker right now. They like the hours and stuff, but it's incredibly repetitive as you can imagine. Basically you have to teach the entire private pilot suite of maneuvers, plus full downs and stuff, in 45 hours and change. And that's all you do.
  11. I know a few ENG guys.... around these parts, during tornado season their job gets pretty interesting.
  12. I'll be up there June 1. Anyone who wants to meet up, send me a PM. I'm sure we'll all be in the same general area.
  13. Is it weird that I don't know? I'm in a company right now that has a strong utility leaning, and I could certainly go that route in a few years, so I answered Utility. I've got a little time on a 150' line right now, and it's certainly challenging work. I think I could enjoy that quite a bit, but we'll see. I'm also staring down the barrel of being my company's CFI for the flight instruction side of things (we're a two, going on three, helicopter operation) so I'll get to see what it's like being the leader instead of the follower. Honestly, I want to try a bit of everything. I know I love flying, and I know I'll do just about anything with a few exceptions. Luckily, I'm in a position where I'll be able to be a little picky with my next job or two. Now if only I could get into that whole turbine thing!
  14. Is it weird that I don't know? I'm in a company right now that has a strong utility leaning, and I could certainly go that route in a few years, so I answered Utility. I've got a little time on a 150' line right now, and it's certainly challenging work. I think I could enjoy that quite a bit, but we'll see. I'm also staring down the barrel of being my company's CFI for the flight instruction side of things (we're a two, going on three, helicopter operation) so I'll get to see what it's like being the leader instead of the follower. Honestly, I want to try a bit of everything. I know I love flying, and I know I'll do just about anything with a few exceptions. Luckily, I'm in a position where I'll be able to be a little picky with my next job or two. Now if only I could get into that whole turbine thing!
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