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Tradewinds

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Everything posted by Tradewinds

  1. If you are planning on living off base, make sure you visit the area before you lease a place. One mile one way or the other can make a big difference. Be aware that traffic simply sucks around JBLM during commute times so don't pick a place that is far away from base.
  2. Not sure if this helps at all but, my son is stationed with and good friends with a married couple that are both flying 60's. They are both commissioned officers and both graduated from Rucker together. They were both stationed in Hawaii. They seem to be doing fine, they just had a baby not long ago and have had no issues. Training schedules are different but they have been able to work out the schedules pretty well.
  3. Yes, you can share a house on base and you split the rent and keep the extra BAH, or as stated above you can find your own housing off base and split that rent as well. Best bet is to check with others going through WOCS to see if you can find a roommate. I believe the on base housing may have some resources for roommates as well.
  4. If you're looking for a big change in scenery, JBLM will have a lot of opportunities.
  5. No disrespect taken, I missed that you already have a degree. I have absolutely nothing against the Infantry, and you're right, the MOS's you mentioned can have "cool stuff" training. You shouldn't have trouble finding a Guard unit with openings in Infantry and Armor, Aviation shouldn't be an big issue since you're willing to relocate. With a 4 year degree you'll be able to enlist as an E-4.
  6. I forgot to mention, since you are willing to relocate you'll have a better chance of getting the MOS you want. Having the ability to look at different NG units, you can see what MOS slots they need or have available. You can apply to WOFT from any MOS, one tip though would be to try and find a unit that has Aviation, this way you will have better access to those you will want LOR's from. Working within an aviation MOS will give you closer contacts but it isn't a requirement. Just make sure you choose something that interests you in case you are unable to move to WOFT. Don't just look at the MOS title, research what type of follow up training it offers, will that training help you in your civilian job while you're in the NG and after you get out. Some MOS may not seem all that glamorous but the training you receive can really help outside the Army, look at the total picture.
  7. The best thing you can do is really think about what interests you have, then pick a MOS that match those interests. Do you enjoy a more Tech environment, if so look at the Signal Corps or Cyber. Mechanics interest you, then there are plenty of options, Logistics?, there is Transportation and Quartermaster. Once you have taken your ASVAB you'll have a better idea of what is available to you, not all MOS are available all the time and you may have to wait longer for the one you want. I'm not really sure where the comment comes from that nobody wants to "pick up a gun". At least among Commissioned Officers, Infantry is the most sought after branch of the Army, I'm sure that runs true for enlisted as well. You just have to decide if that's the job you want, while it has the Hooah factor, other MOS may give you more practical training for civilian employment since you would be in the Guard. Just as a side note, I don't think anyone would want someone to "Solute" them.....whatever that is.
  8. So I'm just curious......Did Shindig change his name to Pluto?
  9. I think the biggest issue is that the DUI was so recent, while he'll be off probation in 2019 doesn't help either. Add to that the "Significant Aftercare" for 3 to 5 years, I would imagine his chances of even getting to the board would be close to Lottery odds.
  10. Both of my sons were sent to Hawaii out of flight school, 5 went from my older son's class and 3 from my younger son's.
  11. I guess since the OH58 is gone they don't feel a need for that training, too bad.
  12. Dual engines don't help much with pilot error, case in point the the last incident in Hawaii, although dunker training may not helped in that case.
  13. You will need to be in uniform, ACU's. Do you have housing set either on base or off, if on base then you'll go to the housing office for ther area you will be living and get everything settled, your wife can start getting the house ready while you're inprocessing. I would allow for a lot more time then just 3 hours and it will take place over a few days. Do you have you household goods scheduled for delivery or are you bringing everything with you.
  14. Is it considered rude to Laugh for a prolonged period of time.
  15. Why not just go for the "Van down by the River" A guy in my son's class lived in a trailer, seemed to work ok for him. He bought the trailer when he got there, lived in it and then sold it for what he paid for it when he left. Kept a good chunk of his BAH every month.
  16. The pluses and minuses have been pretty well explained in the above posts so I'll add just a couple things. The largest factor is that you will not be guaranteed the Aviation Branch out of OCS for Active Duty, the only chance at a guarantee of Aviation from OCS is to go National Guard Aviation. There is a chance that your OCS class may not even have any Aviation slots available when it comes time to Branch select, and you won'r know this until you are halfway through OCS. You could easily be branched Infantry, Transportation, Quartermaster, or any of the 16 branches the Army has to offer. The thing to realize (which many new ROL's don't) is that if you commission into Aviation you are an Aviation Officer, notice I did not say Pilot. Sure, you will learn to fly and you will fly a fair amount in your first 3 years, but after that you will start to move up and out to different responsibilities. While your working in Aviation your primary responsibility won't be flying but will be in all aspects of Aviation...planning, training, administrative, and so on, thus the term "Aviation Officer" This is all work that needs to be done to keep the Aviation machine moving, it's just not what some think it is when they branch Aviation. A commissioned Aviation officer can re-branch down the road, they are a commissioned officer first and an Aviation officer second so to speak. Back a while ago when the OH-58 was retired there were many RLO's that switched branches rather then stay Aviation and transition to a new aircraft. This opportunity was a bit smoother for RLO's. If you want to fly and are not interested in the other aspects of Aviation then stay Warrant but even as a warrant you will have other responsibilities other then just flying.
  17. Too bad, I thought you wrote a great reply and had great points.
  18. Just to clarify for those that will soon be new to Army Aviation, what would be considered In the scope of a WO duties, and what tasks are being assigned that are outside that scope. Given the Average number of flight hours and prep per week, what are the duties that would be considered within the scope that could be tasked when not flying.
  19. Makes sense over the long haul, but I can also understand those that are wary of losing the 90 to 95K per year to make a jump. As always you have to look at the pot of gold and realize that it's at the End of the rainbow, not the beginning.
  20. Just curious. How long would someone fly with the Regional after completing a program such as Envoy before being able to transition to a major carrier. How do the salaries compare as a new hire to a major carrier. I only ask because a fellow Aviation Officer who served with my son was also a victim of the OH-58, he looked into this program when he headed back to Rucker for the CCC. He found that the cost of moving to San Diego for training and the substantial pay decrease was not as attractive as he first thought. I would imagine that over some years if one were to progress to a major carrier the pay would in time exceed those concerns, just wondering how long that would take. In the end he stayed, completed the course and is now the Commander for BWS.
  21. If the Army were to emulate the Air Force, there would not be any Warrants. The bulk of the AF budget goes for aviation and the support of aviation, The Army has 20 or so branches all dipping into the same money pot. The Army already save quite a bit just on the WO base pay, the difference between an O-3 with 4 years TIS and a W2 with the same is substantial in itself. The AF is not immune to these same issues and is already having a pilot shortage, with the transition from flying their fixed wing to the commercial sector being much easier, they are losing pilots at a similar rate if not more, the bonuses they are giving really reflect the extent of the problem.
  22. A follow up question. If you were to write a proposal for retention of WO Aviators, what suggestions would you include? Take into consideration that a significant increase in the budget would be needed to make things like more flight time possible. Very interesting insight and comments so far.
  23. What are the most common complaints among the WO Aviators, and what could be done to improve retention and morale?
  24. If they happen to decide to divest an airframe like they did with the OH58, then you would have the chance. The Army is switching to the term "Vertical Lift" these days, what that will end up looking like in the next 10 to 20 years may be very different.
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