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Northoftheborder

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About Northoftheborder

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  1. Meanwhile, in the other North American ICAO Member state.... https://copanational.org/en/2019/07/18/tcca-clarifies-helicopter-flight-vs-air-time/ Whatever happened to ICAO Harmonization of regulations?
  2. No minimum experience requirements at our company. Here's the company procedures I wrote for our Company Operations Manual which was approved by the Minister of Transport (in Canada) as being compliant with the regs. Not sure about the FAA rules. (1) No person shall start an engine or leave an engine of an aircraft running unless a pilot's seat is occupied by a person who is competent to control the aircraft, unless: a) No persons are on board the aircraft b)the aircraft is parked on a solid level surface c) the throttle/engine has been rolled back to idle d) Collective and cyclic frictions are tightened to prevent the controls from moving and collective lock is engaged (if applicable) e) pilots shall remain within close enough proximity to take the controls in the event the aircraft began to move. NEVER leave the aircraft unattended. f) Pilots should remain in the seat and at the controls in excessive winds or gusting conditions or if other aircraft are landing in the immediate vicinity. g) No aircraft loading/unloading shall occur while the seat is unoccupied Glad to see you appreciated the link.
  3. Good answer. The harrier hadn't crossed my mind. Thanks for the reply
  4. Has anyone on this forum ever heard of a fixed wing aircraft that became airborne when it wasnt moving "across the earth's surface"? https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.verticalmag.com/news/ntsbissuespreliminaryreportforgrandcanyonhelicoptercrash/amp/
  5. Should time in service also be logged? ยง 1.1 Time in service means: with respect to maintenance time records, means the time from the moment an aircraft leaves the surface of the earth until it touches it at the next point of landing.
  6. To be clear the above entries are not from any official logbook. Just notes made by the pilot throughout the flight of what occurred. Whether you are in Canada or the US, These take-off and Landings could be written down in a notepad or,tracked electronically or in a variety of ways. . So it appears you feel the US definition for flight time is consistent with the ICAO definition. Isn't that contrary to the FAA official interpretation? If so, in Q1 you have misrepresented your flight time by more than 100%, haven't you? I agree with you on the "time in service", 100% though. Anyone disagree?
  7. I understand quite fine. I ubderstand that you likely don't have the courage to put yourself out there by providing a multiple choice answer or numerical figure. You're also likely the type who would prefer to belittle others as opposed to taking part in an open and honest discussion which might beniefit others. Maybe you should just try answering half the question at a time. That might be a little less intimidating for you. What's the "time in service" for the aircraft logbook entries that need to be made for flights in Q1. And Q2?
  8. There's no way your answers would fit in the appropriate column of either logbook. They're too full of yourself.
  9. Still no answer. Typical helicopter pilot forum lol.no offence...i'm one too but.... A bunch of people who like to run off at the mouth and hear themselves talk but deflect and avoid when asked a direct question....
  10. Thanks for taking part Bro. FYI it was multiple choice, not essay lol No mention of which answer you choose or "Tine in Service". You do log that in the Aircraft logbook I assume? Would your aircraft "time in service" equal your Flight Time (or PIC time) in all these cases you discuss? I assume you received some dual instruction time while training but I'm not too concerned about arguing what is PIC time, so let's just call it all PIC time if you insist.
  11. Oh pardon me. You are absolutely right. In Canada Air Time is the equivalent of your "Time in service," as defined in section 1.1 Title 14 of FAA regs. "Flight Time" is also defined in the same section. So just switch out "Air Time" with "Tine in Service" and the question works for FAA regs I think. You guys seem to be s little testy, but I'm simply looking for your opinions as pilots, under the US regs, how you would log these 2 flights. Pretty simple request
  12. Hey I'm not arguing on behalf of any interpretation. If the law is so very clear, (along with case specific interpretations from the Cheif counsel) then why won't you humour me and answer the two multiple choice questions. It should take significantly less effort than the speeches. I'm not really looking for an argument about what's right or wrong;
  13. Official interpretation has been given in Canada by Headquarters and the Director General (on behalf of the Minister) also, but it obvious to everyone that TC still is not enforcing it consistently and recent court decisions contradict the official interpretation. MANY MANY pilots, schools and operators are not logging in compliance with the official interpretation. So why not humour me And play along? Answer the questions if you're so confident it's not happening in the US.
  14. So let's see how much variation in interpretation there really is... Several very basic questions have been distributed to industry stakeholders (within Canada and internationally). They've also been posted in the Canadian Forum. Why not give them a try for shits and giggles. Here's the first 2: Q1. A pilot flies a Bell 206 Jet Ranger on skids between CYMO (Moosonee Airport) and the Lagoon Heliport (Moose Factory Island) and makes the following entries in his pilot flight log. Time up is the moment his skids leave the earths surface and Time down is the moment his skids make contact with the earths surface at the next landing. Engine Start Time/Blades turning: 754 Time Up Time Dn Air Time Starts Comments 800 804 4 min 1 CYMO Lagoon 809 812 3 min 0 Lagoon CYMO 816 819 3 min 0 CYMO Lagoon 822 825 3 min 0 Lagoon CYMO 829 833 4 min 0 CYMO Lagoon 838 841 3 min 0 Lagoon CYMO 844 847 3 min 0 CYMO Lagoon 850 853 3 min 0 Lagoon CYMO 855 858 3 min 0 CYMO Lagoon 904 909 5 min 0 Lagoon CYMO Engine Shutdown @ 912; Rotors Stopped @ 914 A1. For the above entries: The pilots calculated Flight Time and Air Time respectively, should be: a. Flight Time = 1.3 / Air Time = 0.6 b. Flight Time = 0.6 / Air Time = 0.6 c. Flight Time = 1.2/ Air Time = 0.6 d. Flight Time = 1.3 / Air Time = 1.3 e. Flight Time = 1.3/ Air Time 1.0 f. Flight Time = 1.2 / Air Time = 1.2 g. Flight Time = 1.2/ Air Time 1.0 h. Flight Time = 0.7/ Air Time = 0.6 i. Other: Flight Time = / Air Time = Q2. A pilot flies a Bell 206 Jet Ranger on skids from CYCN to CYTS with no landings enroute. He makes 1 landing at his destination and shuts down the helicopter. He makes the following entries in his pilot flight log. Time up is the moment his skids leave the earths surface and Time down is the moment his skids make contact with the earths surface at the next landing. Engine Start Time/Blades turning: 754 Time Up Time Dn Air Time Starts Comments 800 824 24 min 1 CYCN CYTS Engine Shut Down @ 830; Rotors stopped @ 831 A2. For the above entries: The pilots calculated Flight Time and Air Time respectively, should be: a) Flight Time = 0.4 / Air Time = 0.4 Flight Time = 0.6/Air Time = 0.4 c) Flight Time = 0.5 / Air Time = 0.4 d) Flight Time = 0.4 / Air Time = 0.3 e) Other: Flight Time = Air Time = FYI, some respondents have implied that the scenario in Q1 is not a real world scenario. I can attest that this scenario is real world and is exactly what occurrs on a contract that occurrs 12 weeks per year in Northern Canada (for more than 40 years).
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