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Discap

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Discap last won the day on December 24 2018

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About Discap

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  1. Chris: Thanks for the help. I don't know where you find all this documentation. I looked and found nothing. I am always impressed Bill
  2. HeloNorth Why is NTSB focused on the FLI. Nearly Retired said that it displays all kinds of faults. What is the significance of it going from 1.25 to 2? Thank you guys for being so polite and professional during this discussion. I have not told the family about this site. but I think I will at this point. I think they will understand the discussion. Bill
  3. So is it safe to assume that the 254 Nr is below the redline for this ship. Also what is the FLI that they address?
  4. I am due to swap out the bleed valve on my Enstrom 480B in the next 25 hours. In looking at it, it seems to be what I would be termed in the car world as a "waste gate". I had assumed that it was a control valve but it appears to be simply a preset pressure relief valve. Can anyone share some light on what it does? Thanks Bill
  5. My friend was the "safety pilot" in this accident. His brother is a missionary pilot (as is his dad) currently flying in Uganda. Brother asked my opinion on what happened and what role if any the FADEC played. I have read the report and it is obvious that they were attempting an auto to the beach to take a break. They did not make it. I have no AS time and don't have any idea how low Nr can go before control problems set in. I noticed that for some reasons there were several roll-on/roll off events prior to entering the water. I am not trying to assign blame or criticism etc. I would like to know how low the reported Nr really was and if the FADEC makes any difference to recovery. The safety pilot had lots of B2 time but very little B3. As you will see this was a brand new helicopter being brought home after purchase/training. Thanks in advance Bill CEN18FA391.pdf
  6. Kind of surprising that you didn’t have to have insurance before. Flight school here tells you that they provide insurance. Yeah it’s provided for them in case you screwup and ball it up. Unfortunately you are not covered so the insurance company comes after you. I could not get them to admit this until I insisted I see their policy.
  7. Can you get blades for these? I thought they were all basically grounded because of blades coming apart. I have seen pictures and it is actually pretty impressive how little blade they need to fly.
  8. It is a very nice machine. The only problem is that it is not registered in the US. Since it is factory built you will never be able to register it in the Experimental AB. You could do Experimental Exhibition but that is really limiting as to where you can fly it.
  9. These guys are pouring money into the project. Without getting into specifics they have developed (and delivered) a Lycoming based engine with water cooled head and cylinders. The machine work and finish is fabulous. It makes a lot of power and the CHT never changes. Unlike most of the kit helis out there it is apparent that real engineers have designed this ship. On the rigid rotor head the “spring plates” for lack of a better term are actually a stack that allows for more than one to fail and the ship keeps going. Very few casting mostly items machined from billet.
  10. 500E I saw that ship at HEI in 2017. I will be surprised if it ever gets to production. They are making their own turbine and everything else. I'll believe it when I see it. I won't buy it however until it has a lot of time and parts distribution etc.
  11. Heloman I have two answers. I really like the idea behind the Scout. It is stout and seems to have plenty of power. The biggest problem is lack of fleet flight time. At Osh they were changing out the clutch drum from a cast drum to a machined one (or vice versa) there are still bugs. There is only one in the states and there is likely a communication problem with the factory (unless you are fluent in Ukrainian, Russian or Slovenian) Even with all this I was really interested in them. Then I bought an Enstrom 480B. In the process I looked at the piston Enstroms really hard. These are in many was comparable to the Scout except that they have 1000s of fleet hours. It is the same size and you can by a really nice one for $200,000. The Safari is a different type of helicopter. I love boring holes in the sky and just farting around in mine. It is not good for going on a trip. After two hours in the saddle it is time to do something else. I am keeping it in case I decide I don't like the 480B I personally would not consider a Rotorway. They fly OK but the engines are good for maybe 300 hours if everything works OK. I know there is a guy in S Africa that swears by them and I think that is great but I see no advantage over the Safari other than looks. If the looks mean something then the Safari 500 is the answer. Last I checked Rotorway was again out of business. Courses for horses.
  12. I would like to thanks everyone who commented on this thread. After much research I have just purchased an Enstrom 480B. Wayne Breeden at Helicopters Inc in Memphis helped with the prepurchase. He has also bravely agreed to check me out in it. The adventure begins Bill
  13. Thanks all. As an update my buddy took this info to heart and has grounded his heli (with 15 year old straps) until they are replaced. Bill
  14. I have been quoted 3% of hull for insurance. In line with the R66 quote above.
  15. Chris thanks for the info. He is operating under Experimental Exhibition. Now the question is, “how do you inspect the condition of the straps”?. Surely the blades grips etc. need to come off for a look. Bill
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