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Jrok14

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Jrok14 last won the day on August 4

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About Jrok14

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  1. Civilian, NPS. I'm currently a High school business / math teacher, and a park ranger on a mountain during the summer where I do law enforcement and first response. I'm also an EMT on the local Search and Rescue team. I'll fly whatever they give me but I've done a lot of medevacs and trauma missions, and would love to fly Blackhawks for medevacs. No Army family history, but my dad and his dad were USAF O-4s who flew F16s, my mom was AirNG and her dad was an USAF E-9 fixed-wing mechanic. Age: 29 ASVAB/GT: 98/132 SIFT: 55 Education: MS in Organizational Leadership 3.7gpa, BS in Business Administration 3.97gpa, AS in General Studies, EMT, (200 credits) Flight Physical: Stamped, no Waivers (thought I was going to be on May board, but found out I needed an eye surgery during my first phys, so here I am finally after post-op got cleared) LORs: USAF O8 in my dad's squadron back in the day and has known me since I was born, USN O5 (ret.) Search and Rescue pilot on my SAR team, CW4(ret.) I've known for 20 years, and USAF O6 (ret. but still contracting for USAF) civil engineer I've known since I was born (my best friend's dad). Waivers: None Flight: None Good luck everyone!
  2. I found out same thing during my class 1 flight phys. it was .25 past the waiverable on my left eye. Ended up getting lasik refractive surgery, which pushed my packet back 5 months... I'll be on November board. Good luck!
  3. Not sure since I'm not actually there yet, but I had to get a refractive surgery on my left eye, and the flight surgeon and my recruiter scheduled the 3-month post-op for my class 1, and said the MEPS one I already had would be fine since it's less than a year old
  4. Anyone had super quick flight physical turnaround time at Rucker recently? My packet has been prettymuch ready to go since May, but I found out in the last stage of my Class 1 that I needed a refractive surgery on my left eye. I had the surgery and everything is good to go, but my 3-month post op appointment at Carson isn't until September 13 (exactly 3 months later) and the September board date is the 16th. The flight administrator and flight surgeon over there know me now and are super helpful, and I know will send it to Rucker right away (they felt bad for me when I found out at my appointment that I had 20/20 but needed a surgery still). But I'm wondering if there's even any chance of getting it stamped and uploaded for the 16th board date. (Civilian - so I don't have to follow the same initial dates, though I'm not sure if submitting it day of the deadline is a good look either...)
  5. Good luck all! I'm getting eye surgery on my left eye in a couple weeks so fingers crossed all goes well and I'll be on either the September or November board.
  6. Oh hey, I had one of those just today. My packet was done except finishing up the eye exam for the flight phys. I have 20/20 in both eyes, but turns out I guess my left eye is a weird shape, so much that my only option is refractive surgery that "might" fix it or might make it worse, which is expensive and most civilian docs don't want to do since I have 20/20... The docs had never seen something like this before, so you never know I guess. I've got a guaranteed 68w slot as a flight medic in a reserve unit in town, might go that way and have the Army pay for my surgery and cross my fingers..
  7. I would say if this happens to anyone else give some pushback.. I'm a civilian, no prior service, and I had everything (including full labs) scheduled through the flight surgeon's office. Only thing they didn't really do was dental, they just glanced at my mouth and signed the papers but I didn't have to bring in any records or pay for anything...
  8. Haha right? No, but it did leave a huge impression on me and I was inspired to do first response and serve others, which I do with SAR and the volunteer FD. My dad is a commercial pilot now and he was on a United flight on 9/11 with the same destination and we weren't sure for a while if he was on one of those flights, so it was a pretty life changing experience for my 11 year old self. Anyhow, hand tattoos were years ago and the product of being young and not thinking about being unable to join the military with them - though they actually are the most meaningful of all mine, and I wanted them on a place I could see all the time. I've talked to recruiters over the years and finally decided they weren't worth it to me to keep me from pursuing this path.
  9. Awesome thanks. It wasn't listed on the checklist he gave me, but as I've been digging through the weeds of various forms I saw it listed as optional on UF 601-210-12. Some of the verbiage on the website makes it hard to decipher which forms are actually for nps WOFT and which are not - want to make sure when I submit it's based on the correct info/checklist
  10. Anyone know, for civilian NPS applicants, do we need / can we include a resume? My recruiter said we did and I have an updated one uploaded in the system which I feel great about, but I don't want to 'lose points' for having one uploaded if I'm not supposed to...
  11. New version:: Why I want to be an Army Aviator Personal, professional, and volunteer Search and Rescue experiences ignited my desire to become an Army aviator. My dad and his father were USAF O4 F-16 pilots, and my mom’s father was a USAF E9 fixed-wing mechanic. Between my military upbringing, witnessing 9-11, and volunteering with Hurricane Katrina disaster relief, I always knew I wanted to serve my country and help others within a leadership role and first response. Each Army core value resonates deeply with own, especially those of selfless service and personal courage. Becoming an Army Warrant Officer perfectly blends my duty to serve with my skills, experiences, and passion for aviation. I am committed to a life of leadership and service. During college, I worked as an Assistant Manager at Starbucks and started coaching high school lacrosse. After completing my Master’s degree in Organizational Leadership, I became a high school math teacher, a summer law enforcement ranger on Pikes Peak, and a volunteer rescue/K9 member of EL Paso County Search and Rescue (EPCSAR). I also earned my Emergency Medical Technician license to further develop my medical skills in the field. With EPCSAR, I frequently respond to a variety of missions including severe traumas, medevacs, high-angle rescues, and body recoveries. As a courageous leader, I remain calm while performing dangerous rescues, making critical decisions, and directing operations. I lead by example, putting the needs of my team and mission before myself. Although I love my civilian life, I know two of my core goals remain unmet: flying and serving my country. I am confident in my calling for aviation, I am familiar with the lifestyle it entails, and I am ready to make my commitment. My goal is to fly Black Hawks for combat service support performing medevacs, executing rescues until I retire. I see no greater honor than to follow my family’s legacy and serve our great nation as an Army aviator.
  12. Truth. I'm his first warrant so it's been a bit of a bumpy ride, which is what led me here, and why I want to do all I can to make sure I'm submitting the best version of what I can... I'll keep checking and searching through here when I have questions. Thanks!
  13. Pmortillo, Thanks! That is super helpful. I didn't know there were specifics on the paragraphs, my recruiter just said to write about what made me want to be a WO, not why I'll be good at it, though it makes sense that's what they're looking for. With mentioning my hands and considering I was trying to explain why I waited until I was 29 to get my stuff together and show I was committed since I've been getting them removed for months, but I guess after reading though everyone's stats here that doesn't seem too old afterall. I will do some digging around the forum and get to work. Thanks again, appreciate it!
  14. *as the civilian of my family, I'm realizing I should probably use abbreviated rank.. "My dad and his dad were USAF O4 F-16 pilots, my mom was in the Air National Guard, and her father was a USAF E9 fixed-wing mechanic.
  15. ***Update*** I believe I have a better Idea of what the essay is supposed to be now, thank you all for your suggestions on this version! Posting my edited version below in the comments. Hey all, wondering if I could get a little feedback on my essay. I looked at the Army Writing Style publication per a recommendation on another post and made a few tweaks, but want to make sure I do the best I can on it. Why I want to be an Army Aviator Together my personal, professional, EMT, and volunteer Search and Rescue experiences fervently ignited my desire to become an Army aviator. My dad and his dad were USAF O4 F-16 pilots, my mom was in the Air National Guard, and her father was a USAF E9 fixed-wing mechanic. Growing up, I sat for hours on end listening to my grandfathers stories about being part of something greater than themselves. Then, on September 11, 2001, I saw our nation in turmoil as the towers crumbled. Heroic first responders on scene risked their lives to save others, as did the brave servicemen and women in the time following. While watching the aftermath unfold, I felt my calling awaken. It was then I knew beyond a doubt that no matter what I did - I wanted it to include serving my country and helping others, especially within a role of first response. Aviation continued to be an integral part of my upbringing; much of my life was spent in and around planes. Ever since I was young, my goal was always to fly helicopters someday. Later when Hurricane Katrina struck, I volunteered with relief efforts and fell deeper in love with the idea of working in disaster relief. Over the years, I strongly considered joining the Army, but was unable to with hand tattoos - at the time unwilling to remove what I thought was a part of who I was. I set out to find a career, knowing I wanted to pursue first response, to serve in a leadership capacity, to give back, and to someday learn to fly. After completing my Masters degree in Organizational Leadership, I became a high school math teacher, a seasonal ranger on Pikes Peak, and a volunteer member of EL Paso County Search and Rescue (EPCSAR). On Pikes Peak, I am responsible for law enforcement and first response. As a very involved rescue and K9 member of EPCSAR, I frequently respond to a variety of missions including severe traumas, medevacs, high-angle rescues, missing person and evidence searches, and recoveries. I also acquired my Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) license in order to further develop my medical skills in the field. Although I love my civilian life, I know two of my core goals remain unmet: flying and serving my country. As a teacher, I can no longer genuinely encourage my students to pursue whatever they are passionate about, while simultaneously denying my own calling. I started the tattoo removal process last September, because it turns out a few black lines do not at all define who I am. Instead, I am defined by my dreams, my goals, and my desire to serve and fly while helping others. I am working rigorously to make this dream a reality, and I am ready to make my commitment. My goal is to fly Black Hawks for medevacs, and I see myself being a medevac pilot until I retire. There would be no greater honor in my mind than follow my familys legacy and serve our great nation as an Army aviator. Would love any feedback. I know the middle paragraph is 8 sentences but don't really know if I should edit it. I also saw the thing about only reading first and last sentences sometimes so I changed it up a bit and tried to throw out all the important stuff in my first sentence..
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