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Turbine Transition


RtrCFI
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Greetings

I am beginning my turbine transition for the AS350 and want to develop my understanding of turbine engines, as well as any advanced systems that may apply to the helicopter. Any suggestions?

 

Yep. Try to be facing into the wind on startup.

 

Other than that, I got nuthin' :lol:

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suck, squeeze, bang, blow..... easy as that. why do ppl PAY for turbine transitions? a lot of money for a few hours that really dont make a difference?

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Ft. Rucker is hiring CFIs at 500 hours. Free turbine time, over $60k anually, and i believe they send you through a good training course. I haven't looked into it too extensively, but I'm definitely considering it once I hit my 500.

 

As far as texts, get a POH or military -10 or engine manual for a turbine aircraft (preferably the one youre going to be operating). I'm a UH-60 mechanic and that's been the primary source of my knowledge. Also helps if you have a friend that's experienced and can show you the ropes.

 

J-

Edited by Justin DBC
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Justin,

 

The LSI option there are Rucker would certainly be a sweet gig, good money, less hours, nothing but turbine time... but no matter how you cut it, it's in Alabama. Ha. I make fun of it, but it's really not that bad. You better be on your game if you are going to apply at 500 hours, I'm not trying to scare you by any means, but the average flight time for an IP out there in something like 6,000 hours.

 

 

the LSI IP schedule... 3.0 Flight hours everyday, M-F, Approx 6 hour Duty Day. Not friggin' bad.

 

 

1bad, even though there isn't a BANG like one would think in a piston engine, there still is combustion...

 

 

CHAD

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Justin,

 

The LSI option there are Rucker would certainly be a sweet gig, good money, less hours, nothing but turbine time... but no matter how you cut it, it's in Alabama. Ha. I make fun of it, but it's really not that bad. You better be on your game if you are going to apply at 500 hours, I'm not trying to scare you by any means, but the average flight time for an IP out there in something like 6,000 hours.

 

 

the LSI IP schedule... 3.0 Flight hours everyday, M-F, Approx 6 hour Duty Day. Not friggin' bad.

 

 

1bad, even though there isn't a BANG like one would think in a piston engine, there still is combustion...

 

 

CHAD

 

Anyone have a link to where I could apply for that Ft. Rucker job?

 

~Jeff

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Yep. Try to be facing into the wind on startup.

 

Helps, but having a good battery is more important.

 

 

cyclic & collective by shawn coyle is the business for begining your more advanced knowlege of helicopter systems and turbine engines.

 

Second on this one. Cyclic and Collective is one of the best, if not the best, book on flying helicopters that I have read.

 

Suck, squeeze, burn, blow. Sounds a little more accurate. Maybe without the commas, since all four occur at the same time, continuously.

 

Besides, if your piston engine BANGs you had better have it looked at, sounds like you might have a detonation problem. Gasoline burns in a cylinder, it doesn't explode.

 

-S

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well, theres really two things that HUGE things you have to worry about while transitioning from piston to turbine. Over-Temping your engine (which my dad just did unfortunately due to a broken fuel valve, thank god though he got it on the ground.) or over torqueing your transmission. All helicopter vary on whether theyll torque out or temp out first, but the one thing you have to learn is, unlike in a piston which you can pull pitch until it wont give you more power, a turbine is much more discreet before itll fail on you. A turbine helicopter will sound fine right until it quits. So keep your eye on your gauges, and make sure everything stays in the green. Also, unless your fortunate to have an inteli-start system (which ive only seen once) you really have to be on your game during the turbine spool up/ start or you can cook your engine. They are much much complex but once you understand how you need to treat them, theyre a thing of wonder.

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If I remember correctly, the BA and B2 will have modulated starts. In that you will be on the Fuel Flow Control to regulate the amount of fuel during start. That can be fun and interesting sometimes.

 

The B3 should have a FADEC. This means you will flip the starter and it will start for you automatically. Always be ready for to shut the helicopter down in case you have a problem during start where the T4(temp) comes up to fast and is getting ready for a hot start.

 

You'll be fine. It's really not as hard or bad as everyone makes it out to be.

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1bad, even though there isn't a BANG like one would think in a piston engine, there still is combustion...

 

 

Right, with out releasing energy by burning a mixture of compressed air and fuel, we would'nt be too productive. lol

I just didnt want anyone to hear a turbine engine "banging" and think "The guys on VR said bang then blow, should be ok".

( Just a slight eggsaduration)

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