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Rotor or fixed wing route to CFI


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Heres where I'm at!

 

I'm a military pilot with a Commercial Inst rotary wing rating. I have 750hr turbine time 150 Hrs in B206 and 600 in Ch-47D. My goal is to get my CFI in a R-22 or 300 CB so I can obtain an instructor job. I don't plan to teach in the R-22 or 300cb but it seems most cost effective when obtaining the rating. I would also like to have my fixed wing add-on for my own leasure but its only a want not a need. The helo cfi is needed for the job.

 

Which way to go?

 

Fixed wing add-on PVT, Comm, CFI, then rotor CFI add-on

 

or just get the Rotor CFI?

 

I'm trying to figure out what the actual requirements are for each and the estimated final costs.

 

If its only a little more I would go the fixed wing route first, but if its a significant difference in cost I'll probably just go for the rotor cfi.

 

Is there anyone out there that has done the fixed wing route after being a military helo pilot and can give first hand experiance and estimated costs.

 

thanks

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Make sure you take the FAA equivalency test within 12 months of leaving service. It's short test and (I think) a check ride and you walk away with a commercial license. Getting the add on fixed wing is a piece of cake after that. I think you only need 20 hours of fixed wing before you can qualify to take the check ride (provided you can . No written is needed I believe. Since it will be an add on you probably can go direct to Fixed Wing Commercial but check the regs on it.

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In your situation, I would get the FAA equivalency out of the way. You only need to take the test and show your military records to the FAA. There is no checkride. And you will end up with a Commercial helicopter with instrument rating. Then do the CFI. I would suggest the H300 as it will be easier for you to transition than the R22. If you want to do a FW add-on, since you already have the Commercial, you do not have to get a private FW. Just the Commercial and Instrument. And the Instrument will be an add-on also. Just 15 hours.

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I'm a military pilot with a Commercial Inst rotary wing rating. I have 750hr turbine time 150 Hrs in B206 and 600 in Ch-47D.

 

 

I looked into this myself. If you are interested in going the RW CFI route, go with the 300, and under FAR Part 61. That would be your fastest option. If you want to use your GI Bill though, you will need to go FAR Part 141.

 

 

CHAD

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I'm a military pilot with a Commercial Inst rotary wing rating. I have 750hr turbine time 150 Hrs

 

I assume from your original post that you already have your FAA RW ticket.

 

I don't remember the specifics, but there is a fair amount of night, day, cross-country, take-off/landing minimums that must be done in an airplane. Plus learning and mastering the commercial maneuvers and single-pilot instrument / cockpit management takes time too. Since you have limited single-pilot & airplane experience, you can count on it taking significantly more than 15 hours.

 

I was a way out of currency OH-58A/C pilot when I got my FW commercial & instrument add-on ratings, and it took me about 70 hours of dual (I basically had to re-learn instruments from scratch). Since you're current and flying a modern IFR certified platform, I'm sure you'll have an easier time than I did. I also think one of the pilot factories like American Flyers can speed things up for you too (I got my multi-engine FW add-on with them in 6 hours).

 

Sorry, I'm not a CFI so I can't advise you there.

 

If you haven't done so, you should check out the APTAP Forums (www.aptap.org).

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I looked into this myself. If you are interested in going the RW CFI route, go with the 300, and under FAR Part 61. That would be your fastest option. If you want to use your GI Bill though, you will need to go FAR Part 141.

 

 

CHAD

 

Hey FL, how are the hookers treating you?

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I don't plan to teach in the R-22 or 300cb but it seems most cost effective when obtaining the rating.

 

That eliminates the aircraft that most flight schools offer. What do you plan on doing with the CFI rating? Will you be instructing in a turbine?

 

If you just need the rating take the written, study your materials and prepare per the PTS, do some dual in a 300 until you are comfortable, and take the check ride. You already meet the requirements you'll just need an instructor to sign your endorsement. Find out who the DPE is that will be conducting your check ride and get the 411 on what to expect. You might be able to call flight schools in his area and get the scoop from instructors/students.

 

I wouldn't recommend taking it in an R22 if you're not going to instruct in one you'll just waste time/money getting used to the touchy little sucker.

 

If the fixed wing certificate is just for pleasure work on the Pvt. in your spare time once you get a job.

 

Good luck

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Just wondering. You said you don't plan to teach in the R-22 or 300 right? But you said you want an instructor job? Do you have a job already lined up in something other than a 300 or an R-22?

 

The reason I ask is nearly all flight schools use either the 300 or R-22, R-44. With more of those using the R-22 and R-44.

 

The fixed wing add on is easy and since you are current it shouldn't be to much of an issue.

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Heres where I'm at!

 

I'm a military pilot with a Commercial Inst rotary wing rating. I have 750hr turbine time 150 Hrs in B206 and 600 in Ch-47D. My goal is to get my CFI in a R-22 or 300 CB so I can obtain an instructor job. I don't plan to teach in the R-22 or 300cb but it seems most cost effective when obtaining the rating. I would also like to have my fixed wing add-on for my own leasure but its only a want not a need. The helo cfi is needed for the job.

 

Which way to go?

 

Fixed wing add-on PVT, Comm, CFI, then rotor CFI add-on

 

or just get the Rotor CFI?

 

I'm trying to figure out what the actual requirements are for each and the estimated final costs.

 

If its only a little more I would go the fixed wing route first, but if its a significant difference in cost I'll probably just go for the rotor cfi.

 

Is there anyone out there that has done the fixed wing route after being a military helo pilot and can give first hand experiance and estimated costs.

 

thanks

 

Don't bother with the Fixed Wing CFI unless you need it to feed the family. The fixed wing add on might be more involved due to XC, night, instrument requirements etc..

 

Stay with the Helicopter CFI plan, then if you need FW after that, then give it a go. There are no time requirements for the CFI helicopter, so you just might be able to fast track that one due to your experience.

 

FWIW.....Cheers

 

Rotorrodent

FW and Helicopter

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That eliminates the aircraft that most flight schools offer. What do you plan on doing with the CFI rating? Will you be instructing in a turbine?

 

 

most likely he's looking at a job with LSI at Rucker, my best guess anyhow - they train in the 206 IIRC

 

great pay, great benefits and they recently lowered there mins I'd work there in a hearbeat, granted they are close to homebase mind you.

Edited by Rogue
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Yeah but doesn't LSI want 1000hrs? I see you said they lowered the minimums, what are they at now? I am kind of suprised they would since there are quite a few pilots out there looking for jobs at that level.

Edited by JDHelicopterPilot
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umm... don't know what they want specifically, the guy I took lessons from works there and "lowered their mins" was quoted from him. he also said a big pay raise was coming too - six figures within six years of employment. i see a lot of people bash lower alabama on JH but heck within an hours ride you can go to Panama city beaches, Destin beaches - a little further but also Pensacola beaches. Biloxi a couple hours away, Montgomery and Tallahassee are short drives and New Orleans and Atlanta are only 4 - 5 hours - heck with the low cost of living in Enterprise you can buy a little Cessna and spend your weekends anywhere you want :)

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palmfish,

 

the Hooks are treating me very well. I just got back from Nellis AFB (Vegas) where we played Red Flag with the AF flying around in the mountains. Coming from FL, it was a blast shootin' pinnacles to a 7,400' mountain top. I love my job.

 

 

CHAD

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Hey Guys thanks for all the help and advise.

 

And yes, I am looking at possibly working for LSI as I know the program in and out. I am already a product of that training program as I went through it as a student back in 2005.

 

I am also considering working for in Gulf. So I figure at this point I will obtain my CFI in 300c's and start sending out apps.

 

Could anyone recommend a part 141 school on the west coast that uses 300c's.

 

Thanks again everyone!

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There are a few schools on the west coast using the H300, both the C and CBi. There was also a school up by Redding, CA a few years ago that was using the Bell 47. Unless you are using your VA benefits, there is no real benefit to doing your training under Part 141. Depending on how fast you transition into the machine, it could actually cost you more money to do it 141. You need to get the CFI writtens out of the way. I suggest the ASA disk to study/practice for the writtens. I would get them out of the way prior to starting the flight training. Get it out of the way and drive on. There are several good Instructor handbooks on the FAA website.

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What does everyone think about him just finding a 206 to do the check ride in? Wouldn't that be cheaper/faster/easier than spending enough time/money to become familiar in a new aircraft to pass the CFI check ride? At the least he would have to first be comfortable enough in the 300 to perform maneuvers at the commercial level then be confident enough to teach them in it. All for an aircraft that he never intends to instruct in.

 

Just a thought.

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I've been looking into the 206 thing for my CFI. Looks like Civic helicopter is part 141 and has a 206 for $945 an hr min 2 hr blocks. Still havn't got an answer yet though. what are the actual minimum hours required for the CFI if I am proficient? Could I just take the checkride?

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I've been looking into the 206 thing for my CFI. Looks like Civic helicopter is part 141 and has a 206 for $945 an hr min 2 hr blocks. Still havn't got an answer yet though. what are the actual minimum hours required for the CFI if I am proficient? Could I just take the checkride?

 

There are no minimum hour requirements for CFI, you just have to have a Commercial certificate and perform the maneuvers to the Commercial certificate standards. Plus, obviously, you have to be able to "demonstrate instructional knowledge" in all areas of operation.

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There are no minimum hour requirements for CFI, you just have to have a Commercial certificate and perform the maneuvers to the Commercial certificate standards. Plus, obviously, you have to be able to "demonstrate instructional knowledge" in all areas of operation.

 

Correct.

 

Also:

 

-pass the written exam

-get a CFI who has been one for more than two years to endorse you to take the check ride

 

Get a PTS! One of the first things in it is a list of FAA requirements for the check ride.

 

Obviously, prepare very well. Otherwise the money you spend on rental of an aircraft for the check ride will be wasted if you fail and have to come back.

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Check out Heliclass located at Van Nuys airport LA. They rent the Bell 206 for $570. per hour dual instruction, and Philippe is an excellent instructor with over 10,000 hours. He has an R22 available too if you need more time in the cheaper machine.

 

Good luck.

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