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Ok guys and gals, have a question for you. I'll start with the question and see what answers I get. It's a little survey of sorts.

 

 

When weather minimums are below VFR in Class, B,C,D you can ask for a SVFR clearance right?

 

How about when a class D tower is closed and the airspace changes to class E to the surface? With weather still below VFR, can you get a SVFR clearance?

 

If so, from WHO? If you can, who would you call when trying to depart SVFR from Class E and who would you call trying to land inside Class E?

 

 

 

Looking forward to some good answers,

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When the class D is closed, there is still a controlling agency giving IFR clearances to that airport which is now class E to the surface. I believe they are the ones having jurisdiction over the Special VFR clearances at that point. Whether it is a center or an approach control.

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Somebody owns that Class E airspace, probably an approach control. To find out who, you can look in the AFD or on the sectional. It's not kept secret.

 

Note that there are also a number of airports that have Class E surface areas without a tower, so you have to get a clearance whenever the weather is below basic VFR minima. I've seen people violate that countless times.

Edited by Gomer Pylot
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If the airspace reverts to class E to the surface, or if you were at an airport that was Class E to the surface all the time, you can still get a SVFR clearance. You would request the clearance from the approach facility (such as Yuma Approach, So Cal Approach, etc) If the approach facility is closed you would contact Center (LA Center, Albuquerque Center, etc). In the above instances you may have to give them a telephone call if you can't reach them on the ground with an aviation frequency.

 

One time I was flying out of Thermal CA, which is Class E to the surface, and made a request for a SVFR departure with Palm Springs Approach(now So Cal) but because they deal with VFR 99% of the time, it was somewhat of a curveball for them. I succeeded, however, and the request of granted.

 

Here is a good opinion piece on it from AOPA. Thanks

 

How safe is special VFR

Tool or trap? Tell us what you think

Ever heard of the government coming up with a legal method to get around one of its own regulations? I have -- it's special VFR (SVFR), a clearance procedure that allows departure or arrival into controlled airspace without an IFR clearance when the visibility is at least one mile and the pilot can remain clear of clouds.

 

The FAA came up with this procedure to safely expedite departures and arrivals without an IFR clearance when weather conditions warrant. The method is designed to alleviate our frustration when we know that visual meteorological conditions (VMC) exist less than five miles away from the airport, and we are stuck on the ground in instrument meteorological conditions. Or we can't land because a light mist at the airport has lowered visibility to less than three miles. In short, SVFR increases the utility of flying. But how safe is it? First let's talk more about what's required.

 

Weather for a SVFR departure or arrival can be determined by listening to the ATIS, ASOS, or AWOS. Absent any of those weather reporting services, the pilot is permitted to determine from the cockpit if the visibility is at least one mile and the departure or arrival can be conducted clear of clouds. (Helicopters are permitted to operate SVFR when the visibility is less than one mile.)

 

When departing, pilots must be absolutely certain that the weather is VMC within a reasonable distance from the airport. Pilots determine this from flight service, pilot reports (pireps), or another official weather-reporting facility. But remember the reporting station may be distant from your outbound route of flight, and weather can change over a short distance. Discovering continuing IMC weather outside the SVFR clearance limit is not my idea of fun.

 

Student pilots are not permitted to request SVFR on solo flights, and SVFR is not allowed in most Class B airspace. SVFR is not permitted at night unless the pilot is instrument-rated and the aircraft properly equipped for instrument flight. Given this, I've never understood why a pilot wouldn't just file IFR at night rather than dangerously scud run to or from an airport. One reason could be that the airport weather might be below IFR approach minimums, but not below SVFR minimums. Circling visibility minimums for IFR could be greater than one mile, but SVFR requires only one mile of visibility. Regardless, approaching an airport at night SVFR with one-mile visibility isn't advisable and is an accident waiting to happen.

 

Also keep in mind that pilots requesting a SVFR clearance could be extensively delayed because IFR traffic has the priority. Here you are, waiting on the ground or in the air, while IFR aircraft are doing missed approaches or departing. Typically, this could take 10 minutes per arrival or departure. With one departure and two inbounds you could be delayed 30 to 45 minutes. Do you have that much reserve fuel?

 

A typical request for an SVFR clearance from an airport is straightforward and would go something like this:

 

"Hagerstown Ground, Piper Four-Five-Two-Three-X-ray at the east ramp ready to taxi with the ASOS information. Request SVFR clearance, southwest bound."

 

Ground control might respond with:

 

"Piper Four-Five-Two-Three-X-ray. Hagerstown Ground. Cleared out of the Class Delta airspace to the southwest. Maintain SVFR while in the Class Delta airspace at or below 1,500 feet. Report clear of Class Delta or VFR, whichever occurs first. Taxi to runway two seven." For an SVFR approach to an airport, a typical request for landing is made to the tower, with the addition of a request for SVFR.

 

Is SVFR safe? The answer is a conditional "yes" given proper training, complete knowledge of and appreciation for existing conditions, and sound judgment. Most pilots I instruct know something about SVFR but have never used it, nor have they been specifically trained in its procedures. I haven't seen any private pilot courses of study that address SVFR in other than a perfunctory manner. This scenario illustrates how a pilot can get into trouble with a SVFR departure clearance:

 

A non-instrument-rated pilot wishes to depart Hagerstown (Maryland) Regional Airport for a daytime flight to Yeager Airport in Charleston, West Virginia. Hagerstown ASOS reports an 800-foot ceiling and two miles visibility with ground fog. The weather is below VFR minimums, but the visibility is at least one mile and the pilot can remain clear of clouds. He can legally depart the airport with a SVFR clearance. He learns from flight service that the weather is marginal VFR to VFR to the south and west all the way to Charleston. The FSS has no pireps to offer within 50 miles of Hagers-town. The pilot requests a SVFR clearance from the tower. (At a nontowered airport, a SVFR clearance is obtained from ATC via a remote communications outlet [RCO], a ground communications outlet [GCO], or a telephone call.) The pilot must request a SVFR clearance because ATC is not permitted to offer or even suggest the clearance.

 

The pilot departs, but soon realizes that the weather report is inaccurate. Within 15 miles southwest of Hagerstown it is still below basic VFR minimums, if not worse than back at the airport. He is now outside of Class D in less-than-VFR conditions with no instrument rating. The pilot asks the tower for permission to return SVFR, re-enter the Class D, and land at the airport. The tower denies his request because it has incoming IFR traffic.

 

The pilot is now illegal and has caused a problem, if not an emergency, for himself and ATC. He is in mountainous terrain with the ridges obscured. The pilot wisely declares an emergency and is told to immediately climb to 4,000 feet on a 090 heading and contact Potomac Approach. Declaring an emergency was a life-saving decision for this guy.

 

Unfortunately, some pilots might try to fly to another airport and land in less-than-VFR conditions with no SVFR clearance. This is risky at best, not to mention illegal. The good news for this pilot is that he made a successful landing with an SVFR clearance at an airport that fortunately did not have IFR traffic approaching; the slightly bad news is that the FSDO wants to talk to him after he lands. In many cases, the FAA only wants to be sure that the pilot understands the risk of his decision and has learned from it. We cannot overemphasize that an audience with the FAA is far preferable to the alternative.

 

Recent pireps would have helped this pilot to make the right decision not to attempt a SVFR flight under these conditions. A few years ago, the AOPA Air Safety Foundation launched an interactive online program called SkySpotter that encourages pilots to issue more pireps when flying in weather or turbulence. If our pilot had received a pirep from a pilot flying southwest of Hagerstown, he probably would not have taken off.

 

To fly SVFR safely, it is essential that the pilot know all there is to know about the airport and the area surrounding it. I'm talking about terrain and obstructions such as towers, buildings, cranes, and power lines; landmarks and roads that will provide orientation; and checkpoints that lead to and from the airport. The pilot in the scenario either was not aware of or chose to ignore the fact that there are mountains south and west of his departure airport. I question his judgment for taking off with a SVFR clearance into mountainous terrain in the first place.

 

Students should be taught that SVFR is not a license to operate in less-than-VFR conditions whenever they want. It should be used only in specific circumstances.

 

If conditions warrant, take your student into SVFR conditions with a clearance. You don't want them to be unprepared and inexperienced the first time they attempt SVFR on their own. Train them in SVFR procedures and have them experience the conditions in which it can be safely utilized. Better still, push them to get an instrument rating as soon as they earn their private certificate. This provides a viable option when considering SVFR.

 

SVFR is a controversial procedure, and there is always spirited discussion about its relative safety. Used prudently, it can get you down safely if you aren't instrument-rated or current and it's below VFR minimums. On the other hand, does it carry unwarranted risks? We'd like to know what you think. E-mail ASF and let us know your opinion.

 

Richard Hiner retired from the AOPA Air Safety Foundation as vice president of training. He can be contacted at by email.

 

 

By Richard Hiner

 

Here's the criteria

 

Special VFR weather minimums.

 

(a) Except as provided in appendix D, section 3, of this part, special VFR operations may be conducted under the weather minimums and requirements of this section, instead of those contained in Sec. 91.155, below 10,000 feet MSL within the airspace contained by the upward extension of the lateral boundaries of the controlled airspace designated to the surface for an

airport.

(B) Special VFR operations may only be conducted--

(1) With an ATC clearance;

(2) Clear of clouds;

(3) Except for helicopters, when flight visibility is at least 1 statute mile; and

(4) Except for helicopters, between sunrise and sunset (or in Alaska, when the sun is 6 degrees or more below the horizon) unless--

(i) The person being granted the ATC clearance meets the applicable requirements for instrument flight under part 61 of this chapter; and

(ii) The aircraft is equipped as required in Sec. 91.205(d).

© No person may take off or land an aircraft (other than a helicopter) under special VFR--

(1) Unless ground visibility is at least 1 statute mile; or

(2) If ground visibility is not reported, unless flight visibility is at least 1 statute mile.

 

A lot of info on my post, but I hope it helps.

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Ok, now I will tell you what happened to me Sunday. :o

 

I coming back from Palm Springs to Yuma which is Class D, however, the tower was closed and it is then Class E to the surface. Weather was 2 1/2 reported by ATIS/ASOS. So, I figured lets just get a SVFR from Yuma approach, no biggie right. I've done SVFR all the time but this threw me out of the loop.

 

I called Yuma APP, requested SVFR to Yuma and was denied, he asked my intentions. Thinking maybe he didn't understand my request, I asked again in a different way. Again, denied, I asked why and he said because the tower was closed.

 

Rather than continue the converstation I elected to go to Imperial County and fuel up and the return when the visibility came up. I came back two hours later VFR.

 

I asked everyone I knew and they all said the same thing, they would have requested SVFR with App. Afterall, they are handling the IFR traffic.

 

Now, after a review of the AIM. It states to call a nearby tower(don't have one), call FSS(didn't think of it) or call Center. Nothing about calling Approach. I found that interesting.

 

I thought I would throw it up in here and see what you guys thought and get your feed back. It seems we are all pretty much on the same page as to call Approach. I am going to call the tower when they open up and ask them.

 

 

Thanks for the artical Airdoggie, I was aware of all that. I was thrown when I didn't get the clearance when I was positive he could give it to me even if the tower is closed. Which is the reason I called him in the first place.

Edited by JDHelicopterPilot
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Yes it can be done, by requesting a SVFR clearance from the controlling facility. The details for WHO the controlling facility is and HOW they can be contacted is best found in the AF/D - find the airport you wish to use and look under the heading "communications" for the "R" in a circle at the left margin. The "R" indicates who has radar coverage for that airport (the controlling facility when the tower is closed) and the name of the facility and radio frequency that they can be reached on is shown.

 

As far as Class B goes, my understanding is that you won't get a SVFR clearance. All the Class B airports that I have looked at have "No SVFR" right above the airport name on the terminal or sectional chart. If anyone is aware of a Class B airport that does allow SVFR I'd be interested to know.

 

Certainly in Class C, D, E it is an option - subject to traffic and certain weather criteria.

 

Thanks for the post airdoggy, good article.

 

PS I doubt they would post their comments here, but I hear from instructors and examiners alike that there are a lot of pilots out there who would tell you that you either CAN'T GET the clearance or that you DON'T NEED a clearance - scary.

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Heli.Pilot,

 

You can get a SVFR clearance into Bravo. The notation No SVFR is only for the fixed wing guys. The controling agency here at Yuma when the tower is closed, is Approach. That's why I was suprised I didn't get the clearance.

 

I understand there are times they won't give it to you. An example would be conflicting IFR traffic. If that was the case he should have told me and perhaps give me a delay time. That way I can make my request again when the IFR traffic is not a factor.

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Just an update. I am talking with the Tower/App over the phone and they wanted the FAR reference which I gave. They seemed to think Class E wasn't "controled" airspace. I'll let you know how it turns out. Seems right now, I am just trying to educate them so that when this happens again I can just get a SVFR clearance and be on my merry way.

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Heli.Pilot,

 

You can get a SVFR clearance into Bravo. The notation No SVFR is only for the fixed wing guys. The controling agency here at Yuma when the tower is closed, is Approach. That's why I was suprised I didn't get the clearance.

 

I understand there are times they won't give it to you. An example would be conflicting IFR traffic. If that was the case he should have told me and perhaps give me a delay time. That way I can make my request again when the IFR traffic is not a factor.

 

You're right. Having read your comments, I now recall hearing that once before. :)

 

I generally avoid flying in conditions that require a SVFR clearance, and given the density of IFR traffic in Class B, I would not rely on getting cleared. I figure I could quickly find myself stuck in foul weather waiting for a clearance. There may be some time critical missions that require this type of action (such as EMS) but in a flight training environment, and most other areas of aviation for that matter, I think we can afford to make more conservative decisions - ie not fly in conditions requiring SVFR. I understand that there are situations when SVFR may be the only option, and in fact a very good option, however I try to aviod situations that may require me to go SVFR.

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Yep, there is an exception for helicopters in Class B. No SVFR is for airplanes. I've received SVFR into Class B many times, and it's almost always quicker and easier than getting one in Class E.

 

It's amazing how little actual knowledge many controllers have. It is illegal to fly in Class E airspace when the weather is below basic VFR unless you have a clearance, either IFR or SVFR. It doesn't matter whether the Class E goes to the surface. If you're at 800'AGL, and the Class E goes to 700'AGL, you must have either VFR weather or a clearance. I don't know if the approach control you're talking to owns that airspace, but if they do, then they can, and should, issue appropriate SVFR clearances when they are requested. I've never, ever had a problem with that, although I have had to wait for a clearance if there was another aircraft in the airspace. That is understandable, and I have no problem with it, although back in the good old days, when there were real FSSs out in the world, on airports, we used to get multiple clearances, as long as we were going in different directions or could maintain visual separation. The last time I called FSS the guy was in a room in Minnesota, and had no clue about the airports or weather in Texas. I haven't called FSS since. Privatization is a terrible thing. The government does have responsibilities, and should carry them out; enriching corporations is not one of those responsibilities.

Edited by Gomer Pylot
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Yep, there is an exception for helicopters in Class B. No SVFR is for airplanes. I've received SVFR into Class B many times, and it's almost always quicker and easier than getting one in Class E.

 

 

I have received SVFR clearance into Class D and Class E several times without issue or delay. I don't fly in Class B all that often, but when I have, it seems that the density of traffic would often result in a delayed clearance or no clearance at all. Having said that, the controllers at Class B airports are far more familiar and comfortable with a busy airspace than controllers at smaller airports, and perhaps because of that they are more willing to issue a SVFR clearance. It seems that some controllers at smaller Class D airports just don't want more than one guy in the air at a time regardless of weather conditions. :rolleyes:

 

And yes, I forgot about the exception for helicopters to fly into Class B with a SVFR clearance. Plus we can get SVFR at night (without instrument rating and IFR ship) and also get SVFR with less than 1 mile visibility... did forget about the Class B exception though... sorry everyone!

Edited by heli.pilot
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I can understand people wanting to avoid flying in foul weather conditions, and obviously SVFR isn't going to be used in good weather. On the flip side, I think it is good experience for a student pilot to learn, so they understand the process.

 

I did quite a bit of flying in SVFR as a student, and I am thankful for that experience, especially since two of my checkrides were done in SVFR.

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Yeah, I have done a lot of SVFR as well. That was when I was flying in California of course. Now that I am in the desert it won't happen all that much. It just so happened a sand storm went through and before I got to Yuma the visibility I was told went to less than a 1/2 mile.

 

By the time I got there it was up to 2 1/2 as reported by the ASOS, personaly I would have thought it was 3 but since it was reported 2 1/2 I figured I'd just get the SVFR and that would be that. Instead I opened a can of worms.

 

I agree and it depends on the weather pattern as far as when I will take marginal weather. In Sundays case it wouldn't have been an issue but it turned into one.

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I can understand people wanting to avoid flying in foul weather conditions, and obviously SVFR isn't going to be used in good weather. On the flip side, I think it is good experience for a student pilot to learn, so they understand the process.

 

I did quite a bit of flying in SVFR as a student, and I am thankful for that experience, especially since two of my checkrides were done in SVFR.

 

I absolutely agree. For a pilot who has no experience with the SVFR process, SVFR can become a pretty dangerous situation. Students should have a thorough understanding of how the process works, and what the associated benefits and risks are with SVFR. I did several SVFR flights as a student and I'm very glad that I did.

 

Which of your checkrides were SVFR?

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The reason it has been easier to get SVFR from Class B is that it comes from the tower controller, who can see you and is used to lots of traffic, or at least that's the way it seems. A busy approach controller is often more cautious, and it can take awhile.

 

It does depend a lot on the individual Class B, though. Some don't want to talk to anyone who isn't piloting an airliner coming through the approach gate, but some are used to dealing with a mix of traffic and will let you do almost anything you want. In a former life I used to fly pipeline patrol on a route where the pipelines ran underneath the runways of a Class B airport, as well as along the streets on all sides of it. I've gone through there SVFR, and as long as you can fly over the center of the airport at 500' AGL, it all goes smoothly. Once I couldn't get 500', and they held me over the terminal until they got a break in the airliner traffic, then let me go on my way.

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So here we are. Tower/App called me back. He said it seems I am on the right track in that I should be able to get a SVFR clearance from them. Went on to say that they will most likely end up changing their procedures to reflect that.

 

However, not yet. It has been refered to their "training and standardization office" and they will discuss it on Wed. He will then call me back.

 

I found all if this rather interesting.

 

 

Edit: just so there is no confusion about SVFR in Class E, you can not get it in Class E unless it is to the surface(for an airport). In other words, if Class E drops to either 1200' or 700' or other as depicted, you must have VFR mins or go around that airspace.

Edited by JDHelicopterPilot
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Funny that they have to make a reg. their "new" procedure.

 

Yeah, I know. But they haven't yet. They are meeting on Wed. to discuss what I brought up. He did say most likely it will result in new procedure since the guy I talked to seemed to agree with me after I showed him 91.157 and AIM 4-4-6.

 

Not that it should matter, but YUMA is also a MCAS. Are the controlers military controlers or FAA/contract controlers? Does it matter? They should still know the Regulation. Granted, the field proably doesn't go IFR very often in the year.

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Thanks for the artical Airdoggie, I was aware of all that. I was thrown when I didn't get the clearance when I was positive he could give it to me even if the tower is closed. Which is the reason I called him in the first place.

 

I hear ya loud and clear and understand your pain. It seems that when a controlling facility primarily does VFR traffic and non-IMC IFR traffic 99% of the time, they become unsure of themselves about procedures that are commonplace elsewhere. Also, for others here that are unfamiliar, Yuma is special because it is a dual use airport (Marine Corps and Civilian) and I think that plays into their procedures and policies.

 

JD, thanks for sharing your experience and its refreshing to hear stories from that area. I can't count the number of times I've been into Yuma and the few thousand hours logged on the California side over Glamis, Imperial County, Salton Sea, etc. I loved flying down there, except for the bugs in spring. :o

 

Here's some additional info on the controllers responsibility.

 

Section 5. Special VFR Operation

4-5-1. AUTHORIZATION

 

a. Special VFR (SVFR) operations in weather conditions less than VFR minima are authorized:

 

1. For helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft at any location not prohibited by 14 CFR Part 91, Appendix D, Section 3, or when an exception to 14 CFR Part 91, Appendix D, Section 3 has been granted and an associated letter of agreement established.

 

REFERENCE-

14 CFR Part 91, Appendix D, Section 3. Controlled airspace within which special V-F-R weather minimums are not authorized.

 

2. Only within surface areas.

 

3. Only when requested by the pilot.

 

b. When the primary airport is reporting VFR, SVFR operations may be authorized for aircraft transiting surface areas when the pilot advises the inability to maintain VFR.

 

NOTE-

Control facilities shall always retain SVFR operations authority when IFR operations are being conducted in surface areas.

 

4-5-2. REQUESTS FOR SPECIAL VFR CLEARANCE

 

a. Transmit SVFR clearances only for operations within surface areas on the basis of weather conditions. If weather conditions are not reported, transmit an SVFR clearance whenever a pilot advises unable to maintain VFR and requests an SVFR clearance, provided the pilot reports having at least 1-mile flight visibility.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

ATC CLEARS (aircraft identification) TO ENTER/OUT OF/THROUGH (name) SURFACE AREA, and if applicable, (direction) OF (name) AIRPORT (specified routing),

 

and

 

MAINTAIN SPECIAL V-F-R CONDITIONS AT OR BELOW (altitude) (if applicable) WHILE IN SURFACE AREA.

 

ATC CLEARS (aircraft identification) TO OPERATE WITHIN (name) SURFACE AREA. MAINTAIN SPECIAL V-F-R CONDITIONS AT OR BELOW (altitude).

 

b. Transmit clearance for local SVFR operations for a specified period (series of takeoffs and landings, etc.) upon request if the aircraft can be recalled when traffic or weather conditions require. Where warranted, letters of agreement may be established.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

LOCAL SPECIAL V-F-R OPERATIONS IN THE IMMEDIATE VICINITY OF (name) AIRPORT ARE AUTHORIZED UNTIL (time). MAINTAIN SPECIAL V-F-R CONDITIONS AT OR BELOW (altitude).

 

c. If an aircraft operating under visual flight rules attempts to enter, depart, or operate within surface areas contrary to the provisions of 14 CFR Section 91.157 (visual flight rules), ensure the pilot is aware of the current weather conditions. Provide the following information:

 

1. At airports with commissioned ASOS/AWOS with continuous automated voice capability, instruct the pilot to monitor the automated broadcast and advise intentions.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

MONITOR (location) ASOS/AWOS (frequency). ADVISE INTENTIONS.

 

2. At airports without a commissioned ASOS/AWOS, or, if the pilot is unable to receive the ASOS/AWOS broadcast, issue the most current weather report available. Advise the pilot that the weather is below VFR minima, and request the pilot's intentions.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

(Location) WEATHER, CEILING (height), VISIBILITY (miles). (Location) SURFACE AREA IS BELOW V-F-R MINIMA. AN ATC CLEARANCE IS REQUIRED. ADVISE INTENTIONS.

 

NOTE-

Helicopters performing hover taxiing operations (normally not above 10 feet) within the boundary of the airport are considered to be taxiing aircraft.

 

d. At a pilot's request, issue an SVFR clearance, if appropriate, when an SVFR letter of agreement exists between an AFSS/FSS and the control facility. If no agreement exists, request clearance from the control facility. State the aircraft's location and route of flight.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

(Facility name) RADIO. REQUEST SPECIAL V-F-R CLEARANCE (aircraft identification) (direction) OF (location) AIRPORT (specified routing) INTO/OUT OF/THROUGH THE (location) SURFACE AREA.

 

NOTE-

IFR aircraft shall normally have priority over special VFR (SVFR) aircraft.

 

1. If the pilot is operating outside surface area and requests SVFR clearance, issue the clearance or if unable, advise the pilot to maintain VFR outside surface area and to standby for clearance.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

MAINTAIN V-F-R OUTSIDE (location) SURFACE AREA. STANDBY FOR CLEARANCE.

 

2. When an aircraft requests a SVFR clearance to enter surface area during periods of SVFR activity, instruct the pilot to maintain VFR conditions outside surface area pending arrival/recall/departure of SVFR operations.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

MAINTAIN V-F-R CONDITIONS OUTSIDE OF THE (location) SURFACE AREA PENDING ARRIVAL/RECALL/DEPARTURE OF IFR/SPECIAL V-F-R AIRCRAFT.

 

3. If the pilot is operating inside the surface area and requests an SVFR clearance, advise the pilot to maintain VFR and standby for clearance.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

MAINTAIN V-F-R, STANDBY FOR CLEARANCE.

 

e. Suspend SVFR operations when necessary to comply with instructions contained in subpara 4-5-4b or when requested by the control facility.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

SPECIAL V-F-R AUTHORIZATION DISCONTINUED. RETURN TO AIRPORT OR DEPART SURFACE AREA. ADVISE INTENTIONS.

 

After response

 

REPORT LANDING COMPLETED/LEAVING

SURFACE AREA.

 

4-5-3. VISIBILITY BELOW 1 MILE

 

a. When the ground visibility is officially reported at an airport as less than 1 mile, treat requests for SVFR operations at that airport by other than helicopters as follows:

 

NOTE-

14 CFR Part 91 does not prohibit helicopter Special VFR flights when visibility is less than 1 mile.

 

1. Inform departing aircraft that ground visibility is less than 1 mile and that a clearance cannot be issued.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

(Location) VISIBILITY (value). A-T-C UNABLE TO ISSUE DEPARTURE CLEARANCE.

 

2. Inform arriving aircraft operating outside of the surface area that ground visibility is less than 1 mile and, unless an emergency exists, a clearance cannot be issued.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

(Location) VISIBILITY (value). A-T-C UNABLE TO ISSUE ENTRY CLEARANCE UNLESS AN EMERGENCY EXISTS.

 

3. Inform arriving aircraft operating within the surface area that ground visibility is less than 1 mile and request the pilot's intentions. Relay the pilot's response to the control facility immediately.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

(Location) VISIBILITY (value). ADVISE INTENTIONS.

 

b. When weather conditions are not officially reported at an airport and the pilot advises the flight visibility is less than 1 mile, treat request for SVFR operations at that airport by other than helicopters as follows:

 

NOTE-

14 CFR Part 91 prescribes use of officially reported ground visibility at airports where it is provided, and landing or takeoff flight visibility where it is not, as the governing ground visibility for VFR and SVFR operations.

 

1. Inform departing aircraft that a clearance cannot be issued.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

UNABLE TO ISSUE DEPARTURE CLEARANCE.

 

2. Inform arriving aircraft operating outside the surface area that unless an emergency exists, a clearance cannot be issued.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

ATC UNABLE TO ISSUE ENTRY CLEARANCE UNLESS AN EMERGENCY EXISTS.

 

3. Request intentions of arriving aircraft operating within surface areas. Relay the pilot's response to the control facility immediately.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

ADVISE INTENTIONS.

 

c. Transmit a clearance to scheduled air carrier aircraft to conduct operations if ground visibility is not less than 1/2 mile.

 

d. Transmit a clearance to an aircraft to fly through surface area if the pilot reports flight visibility is at least 1 statute mile.

 

4-5-4. PREDESIGNED SPECIAL VFR CLEARANCES

 

Transmit predesigned SVFR clearances only during those periods authorized by the control facility.

 

NOTE-

The control facility may rescind this authorization at any time.

 

a. Apply these procedures only to aircraft equipped with a functioning two-way radio. Refer all requests for no-radio SVFR operations to the control facility.

 

b. Transmit clearances so that only one aircraft at a time operates in surface area unless:

 

1. Otherwise authorized by a letter of agreement between the control facility and the AFSS/FSS.

 

2. A pilot requests and all pilots agree that they will maintain visual separation while operating in surface area.

 

PHRASEOLOGY-

MAINTAIN VISUAL SEPARATION FROM (aircraft type).

Edited by airdoggy
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and was denied, he asked my intentions. Thinking maybe he didn't understand my request, I asked again in a different way. Again, denied, I asked why and he said because

 

because I don't like Koala's in my airspace ??

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