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R22 Preflight


thrilsekr
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My school has 3 R22s. The third has been in Ventura for it's overhaul. Running through the preflight check list between the two currently in service, I have noticed slightly differently wordings and omitted or added points compared to the other list.

So, I am just wondering what is on your preflight check list? I know it is a lot of typing, but if you could tell me what is on yours, I would appreciate it. I am working on getting a copy of one of ours, and I will post some sort of full list of what we have. One thing I have noticed is that the list in the POH is pretty vague (for lack of a better word). Our check list is a bit more in depth, in my limited experience.

For example... This is on neither of the check lists, but the chief instructor mentioned to me that when going over the tail rotor I want to check the flux coupling which is only visible if you bring the tail down so you can see through the little window on top of the tail boom. I should check the coupling visually (since that is the only option) like I would check the flex coupling both in front and behind the upper sheave.

I guess I am kinda a stickler for procedure... I just want to make sure I am not missing anything.

But, at the same time, it kinda blows my mind that I will just click and go with my car and see what happens. It is amazing how much tire pressure or oil level has no particular play in my daily commute, until now.

 

Thanks for any and all input,

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You're going to get a very long list. But since you mentioned the flex couplings, there are 3 of them and you should check all of them. I check the tail coupling by dropping the tail and rotating the tail rotor by hand. I visually check the other two by opening the side inspection door and rotating the tail shaft by hand...that way I can see each nut on each flex coupling as it rotates. Then I check the play by moving the tail shaft forwards and backwards...the play should only be in the coupling itself....which isnt much. As you rotate the tail shaft you are also checking the play in the shaft...which should be minimal.

 

When you check the lights (TR Chip, Low Fuel, etc.) dont just look to see a light lit. Look to make sure it's the RIGHT light coming on.

 

Once you have felt the play in a worn out swashplate, you can tell instantly what a tight swashplate should feel like.

 

You're flying a Robinson....check the main blades please !!!

 

Enough for now,

 

Goldy

 

PS- If your ship is being overhauled in Oxnard (not Ventura) then I would say you made a good choice. I was just there yesterday checking out the shop and saying hi to Dan.

Edited by Goldy
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From my experience . . . we did not like to "pull the tail down" to use the inspection window. Word around the school was that there was some debate whether or not it did better or worse for the robi. Moreover, is it worth "pulling down" on the 22, and risking fatigue on the aircraft? That seemed to be our belief that it was doing more damage than good. So too, when observing the tail rotor oil indicator. We did not want to risk added stress on the fuselage to level the fluid when we could leave it be and observe the current level how it sat, for it is a splash lubrication anyways.

 

I don't remember where the rumor came from and I never really questioned it much. My advise, start to use a little step stool, travel up, and look down in the window. But don't take my word verbatim, if we all had our 2 cents about the checklist im sure we would end up with a pretty extensive remix.

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Here is my checklist.

Is there anything I am missing? Should change? Seems pretty thorough to me and provides a nice flow.

 

R22 BETA PREFLIGHT CHECKLIST

PUBLICATIONS, PAPERS A-R-O-W.

CHECK & NOTE : HOBBS METER, FUEL, SQUAWK

 

M/R GEAR BOX

• COWL DOOR OPEN

• MASTER SWITCH ON > CHECK ALL WARNING LIGHTS

• MASTER SWITCH OFF

• PITOT TUBE & STATIC SOURCE > OPEN, SECURE

• M/R BOLTS & MOUNTS > SECURITY, SLIPPAGE

• M/R OIL LEVEL, TELATEMP CHECK

• M/R CHIP DETECTOR & M/R TEMP WIRING > CHECK

• SHEET METAL STRUCTURE > RIVETS, WRINKLES

• UPPER FRAME ASSEMBLY > BENDS & CRACKS

• FORWARD FLEX COUPLING > BOLTS, SLIPPAGE, CRACKS

• T/R DRIVE FLEX COUPLING > BOLTS, SLIPPAGE, CRACKS

• V-BELTS, PULLEY, TELATEMP > CHECK CONDITION

• T/R PUSH-PULL TUBE > CONDITION, SECURITY, PLAY

• CLUTCH ACTUATOR, BEARING & TELATEMP > CHECK CONDITION

• T/R BELL CRANK > SECURITY, PLAY

• UPPER FRAME ASSEMBLY AFT > CRACKS

• WIRING HARNESS > CONDITION, SECURITY

• M/R GEAR BOX COOLING HOSE > SECURITY

• AUX FUEL TANK > FUEL SAMPLE

• COWL DOOR CLOSED > SECURE

 

ENGINE AREA RIGHT SIDE

• UPPER & FORWARD MOUNTS > SECURITY, SLIPPAGE

• LEFT MAGNETO > CONDITION, SECURITY

• AIR INTAKE HOSES > CONDITION, SECURITY

• CARB HEAT SCOOP > SECURITY, NO CRACKS

• STARTER RELAY > SECURITY, INSULATOR

• LOWER FRAME ASSEMBLY > SECURITY, BENDS, CRACKS

• ENGINE GENERAL > CONDITION, LEAKS, SECURITY

• OIL COOLER & LINES > CONDITION, LEAKS, NOTHING RUBBING

• OIL COOLER COMPARTMENT > CHECK, NO DEBRIS

• CHECK LOWER BEARING & TELATEMP, RIGHT SIDE

• FAN & SCROLL > CONDITION, SECURITY, NUTS, ALIGNMENT

 

TAIL CONE & TAIL ROTOR

• TAIL CONE ATTACHING POINTS > BOLTS, CRACKS, SLIPPAGE

• ANTENNA > CONDITION, SECURITY

• TAIL CONE (RIGHT SIDE) > RIVETS, CONDITION

• STROBE LIGHT & T/R GUARD > SECURITY

• STABILIZER, STINGER > CONDITION, SECURITY, CRACKS

• STINGER > CLEARANCE FROM GROUND, NO SCRATCHES

• T/R GEAR BOX > CONDITION, OIL LEVEL, TELATEMP

• T/R BELL CRANK > CONDITION, SECURITY, TRAVEL

• T/R CHIP DETECTOR WIRING > CHECK CONDITION

• T/R SHAFT P/C BEARING > CONDITION, PLAY

• T/R P/C LINKS > CHECK FOR PLAY

• T/R FLEX COUPLING > BOLTS, SLIPPAGE, CRACKS

• T/R DELTA HINGE BEARING > CHECK FOR PLAY

• T/R BLADES > CONDITION, LAMINATION, CLEAN, WEIGHTS

• TAIL CONE (LEFT SIDE) > RIVETS, CONDITION

• TAIL CONE ATTACHING POINTS > BOLTS, CRACKS, SLIPPAGE

• CLUTCH ACTUATOR & WIRE (LEFT SIDE) > SECURITY, CONDITION

• WIRING HARNESS > CONDITION, SECURITY

 

ENGINE AREA LEFT SIDE

• FAN & SCROLL > CONDITION, SECURITY

• LOWER SHAVE , V-BELTS, RING GEAR > CONDITION, DAMAGE

• LOWER BEARING TELATEMP

• ALTERNATOR, BELT & HOSE > CONDITION, SECURE

• OIL LEVEL > 4-6 QUARTS

• UPPER LOWER MOUNTS > SECURITY, SLIPPAGE

• RIGHT MAGNETO > CONDITION, SECURITY

• BATTERY & RELAY > SECURE

• CARBURETOR & THROTTLE LINKAGE > CONDITION, SECURITY, LEAKS

• ENGINE GENERAL > CONDITION, LEAKS, SECURITY

• LOWER FRAME ASSEMBLY > SECURITY, BENDS, CRACKS

• HEATER HOSES & AIR INTAKE > CONDITION

• FUEL LINES & GASCOLATOR > CONDITION, SECURITY, FUEL SAMPLE

• FUEL TANK SUMP DRAIN > FUEL SAMPLE

 

MAIN ROTOR

• BLADE SPINDLE BEARING RUBBER BOOT > SECURITY, NO LEAKS

• BLADE ATTACHEMENT BOLTS > TORQUE STRIPES

• TEETERING BOLT > TORQUE STRIPES

• CONING HINGES > COTTER PINS, TORQUE STRIPES

• DROOP STOP ON MAST AND FINGER ON BLADE > CONDITION

• P/C LINKS > CHECK PLAY, SAFETY WIRE

• SWASHPLATE RUBBER BOOT > SECURITY

• UPPER & LOWER SWASHPLATE > CHECK PLAY

• TOP END OF M/R PUSH & PULL TUBES > CHECK PLAY, SECURITY

• MAST COWLING > CONDITION

• CHECK BLADES > CONDITION, LAMINATION, CLEAN

 

FRAME & FUSELAGE

• FUSELAGE & DOOR > CONDITION, RIVETS, COTTER PINS INSTALLED

• LEFT SKID GEAR, SKID SHOES > CONDITION

• HORIZONTAL CROSS TUBE > NO EXESSIVE “SMILE”, GENTLE EVEN CURVE

• UPPER FUSELAGE & BUBBLE > CONDITION, RIVETS, WRINKLES

• VENT & LANDING LIGHTS > CONDITION, CLEAN

• LOWER FUSELAGE & ANTENNA > CONDITION

• RIGHT SKID GEAR & SKID SHOES > CONDITION

• FUSELAGE & DOORS > CONDITION, RIVETS, COTTER PINS INSTALLED

 

 

NIGHT FLIGHT

• CHECK ALL LIGHTS: TAIL LIGHT, RIGHT, LEFT & LANDING LIGHTS

 

 

CABIN INSIDE

• SOLO FLIGHT

- LEFT SIDE CONTROLS REMOVED

- BAGGAGE UNDER LEFT SEAT

- LEFT SEATBELT BUCKLED

- LEFT DOOR ON & LOCKED

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From my experience . . . we did not like to "pull the tail down" to use the inspection window. Word around the school was that there was some debate whether or not it did better or worse for the robi. Moreover, is it worth "pulling down" on the 22, and risking fatigue on the aircraft? That seemed to be our belief that it was doing more damage than good. So too, when observing the tail rotor oil indicator. We did not want to risk added stress on the fuselage to level the fluid when we could leave it be and observe the current level how it sat, for it is a splash lubrication anyways.

 

I don't remember where the rumor came from and I never really questioned it much. My advise, start to use a little step stool, travel up, and look down in the window. But don't take my word verbatim, if we all had our 2 cents about the checklist im sure we would end up with a pretty extensive remix.

 

If that was the case, we wouldn't be throwing wheels on the bird to get it into the hangar. The bigger problem is KEEPING the tail down while rotating the tail rotor... I've seen a lot of guys fumble and grab at the stab, for instance.

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From my experience . . . we did not like to "pull the tail down" to use the inspection window. Word around the school was that there was some debate whether or not it did better or worse for the robi. Moreover, is it worth "pulling down" on the 22, and risking fatigue on the aircraft? That seemed to be our belief that it was doing more damage than good. So too, when observing the tail rotor oil indicator. We did not want to risk added stress on the fuselage to level the fluid when we could leave it be and observe the current level how it sat, for it is a splash lubrication anyways.

 

I don't remember where the rumor came from and I never really questioned it much. My advise, start to use a little step stool, travel up, and look down in the window. But don't take my word verbatim, if we all had our 2 cents about the checklist im sure we would end up with a pretty extensive remix.

 

I guess it should be mentioned that if you are going to pull down the tail, use and apply pressure to the gear box only. Don't use any of the stabilizers, stinger or anything else.

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My school absolutely prohibits pulling down on the tail to check the flex couplings for the t/r gearbox and I fully agree. If done PROPPERLY it shouldn't cause any damage to the airframe, but there is so much potential for someone do to something "not-so-bright" and cause serious problems.... Especially if they don't tell someone what they did.

 

SOLUTION: Go to Auto Zone and pick up an inspection mirror. Personally, I think these should come with the dispatch because they are absolutely essential when you are doing a pre-flight. Not only do they help out with the flex couplings, but also with other areas (m/r push-pull tubes, heat shielding, etc.). There is pretty much no way you are going to be able to get a clear view of everything you want to see without one.

 

J-

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One more thing I like to add to my R22 check list is turning off my cell phone. I don't like listening to the feed back through the headset everytime a call came in or a cell phone tower would ping it. Especially if there are two people with cell phones on. Just my 2 cents B)

 

Dom

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What headset are you using? What phone? I have not run into this problem. I have been using the school provided DCs (not sure about the model#). Have the Verizon XV6700.

 

If your phone has enough power to cause problems with your headset, I would be concerned with other electrical issues as well.

Safety Notice 35 from the Robinson R22 POH address broadcast towers. Along the same lines?

Link Here

 

Not to mention the regulations the FCC puts on equipment for both creating and being able to accept interference.

 

Lightspeed Zulus even have built-in bluetooth made to be paired with your cell phone...

 

I wonder what is going on over there?

 

But I guess it makes sense. Take a flight on an airliner, and they tell you to turn off your cell phone, gameboys, tape players, watches and marital aids (ok, maybe not all that). Although MythBusters "busted" cell phone interference, but said it is still a good idea to do it.

 

I am still undecided on the cell phone matter...

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A friend of mine has both david clark and the new zulu. We both have problems in both headsets. I have pantech duo and he has nokia 6555 but our provider is ATT. It makes the same sound if the phones are by computer speakers also. It makes a beeping sound everytime a call is incoming and every once in a while otherwise. I also watched that MythBuster show so don't have any answers, maybe its the air up here in northern minnesota :D

 

Dom

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The problem is the GSM network. Any GSM network will create the same noise, although different phones do it to a different extent - Blackberries are notorious for it because they are so data intensive. Verizon is CDMA so it does not create the same interference. I had this same problem when I switched from Verizon to AT&T. I did find a way to fix it though... I switched back to Verizon! :P

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