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Helicopter Type Rating


121.todd

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Sec. 61.31 - Type rating requirements, additional training, and authorization requirements.

 

(a) Type ratings required. A person who acts as a pilot in command of any of the following aircraft must hold a type rating for that aircraft:

 

(1) Large aircraft (except lighter-than-air).

 

(2) Turbojet-powered airplanes.

 

(3) Other aircraft specified by the Administrator through aircraft type certificate procedures.

 

 

I've got to admit, I'm embarrassed to ask, but what is a helicopter type rating exactly? I know it's more pertinent to fix wings as there are so many variations in airframe. Isn't a "large" helicopter 10 tons+? I'm assuming when I transition from R22 to an AStar I won't need a Type Rating.

 

What are the criteria for one aircraft to be a differant type than another? Especially in regaurds to helicopters. If you fly an S-61, would you need a type rating for an S-92, or an Aircrane? I believe I understand the basics, and I will start to search for technical literature on type ratings. However, if anyone wants to elaborate on personal experience with, or a summary of.. I would appreciate it.

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There is no such thing as a helicopter type rating. There are only type ratings for specific models with maximum gross weights of more than 12,500 lb. You have to have a separate type rating for each model that requires it, and a type rating in an S61 isn't valid for an S92 or anything else.

 

You could once get a type rating in any model, and there are people with BH206 and probably R22 type ratings on their certificates, but that is no longer the case. The S92 is probably the most common type rating now being issued. Unless you become an S92 PIC, or some other heavy model, you don't need to worry about it. The SIC does not have to be type rated, and most operators don't bother to rate them. In anything smaller, it's no longer possible, and you will not need or receive a type rating an an AS350.

 

This assumes you're talking about helicopters in the FAA system in the USA. I don't know about other countries or their requirements.

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This assumes you're talking about helicopters in the FAA system in the USA. I don't know about other countries or their requirements.

 

Yeah, in JAAland you need a type rating for pretty much everything. There's no real need for it in the smaller ships, but it remains in place due to the administrators being mildly retarded and greedy for the exorbitant fees they charge per type rating.

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The SIC does not have to be type rated, and most operators don't bother to rate them.

 

There is a provision in the FAR's ( I don't have them right in front of me, so I can't quote it by number) for the issuance of SIC type ratings. It is required for international operations. There are a very few US helicopter companies that operate internationally and you would need the SIC Type to fly in those operations. It is not a big deal. An 8410 or a signed 8710, plus a visit to the nearest FSDO or DPE will take care of that.

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In Europa under the JAA system you need a typerating for every type you want to fly. It's not a big deal to get them 5 hours for the initial (SE) and 3 hours of training for the following. Basically it's just type training what you would do in the US as well if you want to fly another type. The problem lies in the fact you have to do an annual flightreview for every rating (apart form a few SE piston like the Schweizer, B47, Enstrom and Hiller)

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I have a type rating in the Chinook. The civilian model is the Boeing BV234. All I had to do was fill out the 8710, show my records that I have taken a PIC VFR/IFR checkride in the proceeding 12 months, and boom. Even though it really doesn't mean a thing.

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I have a type rating in the Chinook. The civilian model is the Boeing BV234. All I had to do was fill out the 8710, show my records that I have taken a PIC VFR/IFR checkride in the proceeding 12 months, and boom. Even though it really doesn't mean a thing.

 

Talk to Columbia Helicopter.

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Talk to Columbia Helicopter.

 

Their site doesn't indicate any openings. Do you have inside info.? It'd be pretty sweet to fly a legend again.

 

I would imagine that a BV234 type rating isn't that uncommon, though. At least less uncommon than the bird.

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Sec. 61.31 - Type rating requirements, additional training, and authorization requirements.

 

(a) Type ratings required. A person who acts as a pilot in command of any of the following aircraft must hold a type rating for that aircraft:

 

(1) Large aircraft (except lighter-than-air).

 

(2) Turbojet-powered airplanes.

 

(3) Other aircraft specified by the Administrator through aircraft type certificate procedures.

 

 

I've got to admit, I'm embarrassed to ask, but what is a helicopter type rating exactly? I know it's more pertinent to fix wings as there are so many variations in airframe. Isn't a "large" helicopter 10 tons+? I'm assuming when I transition from R22 to an AStar I won't need a Type Rating.

 

What are the criteria for one aircraft to be a differant type than another? Especially in regaurds to helicopters. If you fly an S-61, would you need a type rating for an S-92, or an Aircrane? I believe I understand the basics, and I will start to search for technical literature on type ratings. However, if anyone wants to elaborate on personal experience with, or a summary of.. I would appreciate it.

***********************

Type Ratings mean different things depending where you are located on the planet. In Europe and Australia for example, a Type Rating means that you have been "checked" out in a particular type of aircraft whether it be a C300, R22, AS350 etc..

 

In the US, Type Rating means more than that. Any aircraft more than 12,500lbs requires the PIC to be Type Rated. That in itself requires much more than a 5 hour checkout!. Usually it entails a 2 week ground school, 1-2 week simulator training, procedures training, written exam, oral exam and a Check Ride from a check airman qualified on that aircraft. After all of this, your Pilot Certificate will show Commercial (or ATP) Rotorcraft-Helicopter S-92. On the other hand, once you have a Rotorcraft-Helicopter rating in the US, you can fly "any" helicopter up to 12,499lbs GTOW.

 

US airline pilots for example will have type ratings for every jet they fly like MD80, B737. For every mulitengine aircraft they fly under 12,500lbs, doesn't require a type rating.

 

You have a Rotorcraft-Helicopter rating on your Private or Commercial certificate. You can fly any helicopter up to 12,500lbs. However, most insurance companies will require you to get a "checkout" on a specific type of helicopter like B206, AS350, EC130 etc.. Those checkouts run anywhere from 5 hours minimum to full blown training programs.

 

In the world of JAAland, their type rating means a "checkout" if you will on every piece of equipment you fly. Nothing more than ultra GW bureaucracy.

 

hope this helps explain Type Ratings!

 

Cheers

 

Rotorrodent

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121.437(a)

 

No weight issue, just need a type to act as CAPT in 121

 

That only applies to flag and supplemental carriers. I know of at least two 121 carriers that operated aircraft of less than 12500 lbs and the pilots did not have type rating. Mostly because type ratings are not available in these aircraft. But generally 121 carriers fly aircraft that weight more than 12500 lbs so it is a non issue.

Edited by rick1128
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And its not a type rating, per se. But you do need a separate endorsement to fly the Robbies under the SFAR.

 

The easiest thing to remember, is in the US, with the FAA certificate, you can legally fly anything under the 12,500 pound weight, except a Robbie.

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  • 3 months later...

Any model with a maximum certificated gross weight of 12,500 lb or more. Off the top of my head, that includes the S92, S61, and B214ST, maybe a few more. Only the PIC has to be type-rated, not the SIC. These models have no military equivalents, although the S61 may have a Navy type. The UH60 has a civilian version, the S70, but there are no commercial models extant that I know of, only a few public use fire versions. The CH47 and CH54 have civilian versions flying, mostly in utility roles, either firefighting or logging. I've probably missed a few others.

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The civilian versions of the chinook CH46 Sea Knight=BV107, CH47=BV234 both operated by Columbia Helicopters out of Portland OR. The S61 is just the S61 same as the SH-3H. Please correct me if I'm wrong. As stated before anything in the US that is over 12,500lbs the PIC needs to be typed.

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Any model with a maximum certificated gross weight of 12,500 lb or more. Off the top of my head, that includes the S92, S61, and B214ST, maybe a few more. Only the PIC has to be type-rated, not the SIC. These models have no military equivalents, although the S61 may have a Navy type. The UH60 has a civilian version, the S70, but there are no commercial models extant that I know of, only a few public use fire versions. The CH47 and CH54 have civilian versions flying, mostly in utility roles, either firefighting or logging. I've probably missed a few others.

 

 

FireHawk out of Florida operate S-70s...http://www.firehawkhelicopters.com/

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