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Tailoring Training


Safa

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I am about to start training very soon (been delayed due to weather). I obviously still have a very long way to go, however, I am already thinking about where I might want to end up in the industry. I really have an interest in flying for either one of the following EMS or for an agency (LE or Border Patrol). Is there a way that I could tailor my training towards these areas?

 

What would the stepping stones be towards these goals? For example would it be better to fly in the GOM to build hours better suited towards EMS or would tours in the Canyon provide more tailored experience etc. etc.

I

would appreciate any input. Yes I know that I am still extremely wet behind the ears and still have to learn, however, I feel being farsighted is not a sin (I understand that to reach these goals will take time).

 

Safa

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The most important item, and I truely mean "Most Important" thing is:

 

"Live your life as if it is on the front page of your local newpaper!"

 

Because being the best pilot, best friend, highest test scorer, fastest runner, best physical shape and even knowing the right peple will not make up for having things in your a background that will not clear the investigation.

 

In my time 20 years for the U.S. Customs Service and many of them in the aviation program (now DHS-CBP) this is the one thing that hurt so many applicants, and I am sure it is the same at state and local LE agencies.

 

People of today do not think about putting things on the internet and doing stupid things as teenagers and adults that they think will not follow them into the workplace.

 

In state and local agencies you have to pass a "background investigation" and in the federal side you have to do the same plus get and keep a security clearance.

 

Example: Simple speeding tickets can cause you alot of problems. Feds require a security cleannce, say top secret, you have to report any ticket with a fine of more than $150.00. Then the explaining comes, then if you get more than one, you can loose the clearance, and then no job without a clearance.

 

What I am trying to say is, with anything that causes the hiring officials to have to do extra work on an applicant, might be the thing that they say, NEXT! Because they do not have to take you, their are hundreds or thousands of qualified applicants out there.

 

Like the previous poster said, pick a department that has aircraft and the numbers are in your favor. Having police experience is not a requirement in some of the federal jobs, but it does not hurt.

 

Example: CBP now has 290 aircraft and 500+ pilots and is the largest law enforcement aviation section in the world. They also have 1000+ applicants every year so for them,,, you do not want to stand-out in the negitive way.

 

Most state & locals and some feds do hire pilots from within their departments but not CBP.

 

You are doing exactly as you should, asking alot of questions now so you can "lean" in the way that gives you the best chances.

 

There are alot of LE pilots on this site and we all have our opinions but, I am sure we all will say that, having a clean background is very very very important in securing a LE pilot's position.

 

Integrity: Doing the right thing, at the right time, for the right reason, when NOBODY is watching!

 

Ask away & best of luck!

 

edspilot

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If you want to go EMS, get your night hours. I know a few CFII's who have covered that by trying to schedule as many instrument students as they can to fly at night. My CFII did that. It certainly didn't hurt me, I've got 16 hours more night flying time than I had before I did my instrument. Certainly didn't hurt him at all, either.

 

Otherwise, edspilot is spot on re:CBP.

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Great point. Night flying during your Instrument training is a great way to build night time. Plus, it will help you get better at reference flying. It truly removes that peripheral view of the ground that you always get when flying with foggles on during the day.

 

If you want to go EMS, get your night hours. I know a few CFII's who have covered that by trying to schedule as many instrument students as they can to fly at night. My CFII did that. It certainly didn't hurt me, I've got 16 hours more night flying time than I had before I did my instrument. Certainly didn't hurt him at all, either.

 

Otherwise, edspilot is spot on re:CBP.

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