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wind...screen?


teddy
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Most everyone calls the windshield a windscreen, I understand this is British terminology so how did it come about being the term of choice?

Why do you think most skids are only curved up in the front and not the back? It may not look as neat but it seems like it would be safer to have it not snag in the unfortunate event of backwards movement. Its been bugging me so I thought I should ask :unsure:

Edited by teddy
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Why do you think most skids are only curved up in the front and not the back? It may not look as neat but it seems like it would be safer to have it not snag in the unfortunate event of backwards movement.

 

Funny, I have thought the same thing. I can remember being told...forward movement only! No backing up for students..

 

Would make sense to just have a slight upcurve on the rear rather than an abrupt angle that can catch things and make bad stuff happen.

 

Then again, helicopters are meant to be flown, they are not necessarily designed and built as trainers. If you can make it thru your first 20 or 30 hours you should be able to keep things moving in the right direction.

 

Goldy

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Oh while you are at it, what is the meaning of life?

:P

 

Life is there for you to enjoy. If you're not enjoying it, you're doing something wrong!

 

I think most helicopter pilots have already figured out what they enjoy doing!

 

Goldy

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Most everyone calls the windshield a windscreen, I understand this is British terminology so how did it come about being the term of choice?

Why do you think most skids are only curved up in the front and not the back? It may not look as neat but it seems like it would be safer to have it not snag in the unfortunate event of backwards movement. Its been bugging me so I thought I should ask :unsure:

For the first, they mean the same thing, it's just a matter of trying to sound cool, I think. I've always called it a windshield, but then I'm just a country boy and never knew any different.

 

I think the skids are the way they are for economic reasons. It takes more metal, thus more money, to make them curved up in the back. Some skids aren't even that curved in the front. They have to be able to slide across the ground forward, to enable autorotations and running landings, but emergency procedures are seldom done backwards.

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Most everyone calls the windshield a windscreen, I understand this is British terminology so how did it come about being the term of choice?

Why do you think most skids are only curved up in the front and not the back? It may not look as neat but it seems like it would be safer to have it not snag in the unfortunate event of backwards movement. Its been bugging me so I thought I should ask :unsure:

 

 

Most everyone calls the windshield a windscreen; I understand this is British terminology so how did it come about being the term of choice?

 

Is it really the term of choice? Bell Helicopter and MD helicopters use the term "windshield" in their IPB documentation. In Robinson's sales and maintenance documentation, I've seen both terms used.

 

As an example, in the R44 brochure under standard equipement they list Tinted Windscreen. Move down a few lines and you'll see Windshield Cover. So it seems you need a windshield cover to cover your windscreen.

 

You're correct, windscreen is the British term taken as synonymous with windshield.

 

Why do you think most skids are only curved up in the front and not the back?

 

Skids are designed for forward movement. Like skis, they curve-up in the front. They were not designed to handle any significant rearward movement. Aft movement on the skids should always be avoided.

 

Recall your Private Rotorcraft PTS (page 1-9) under Vertical Takeoff and Landing:

 

"Maintains position within 4 feet of a designated point, with no aft movement."

 

It may not look as neat but it seems like it would be safer to have it not snag in the unfortunate event of backwards movement.

 

The pilot's ability and overall skill in controlling the helicopter will determine the degree of safety. The well trained pilot will avoid aft movement, thus avoiding any fear of snagging the aft end of the skids.

Pages from r44_brochure.pdf

Edited by iChris
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Regarding "windscreen" or "wind shield" terminology, it's commonly called a "canopy" or "bubble" on aircraft. I'm sticking with "canopy". Comes from the French, and belongs with "fuselage", "aileron", "empennage", even though they once called them "Pare Brise"(wind shield).

 

See link to 1917 glossary of aviation terms.

http://www.archive.org/stream/glossaryofaviati00paguoft#page/n3/mode/2up

 

Besides, Bruce's Custom Covers calls them "canopy" covers, and that's good enough for me.

 

Susie

 

 

 

P.S."Helicopter" even comes from the French word "helicoptere".

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Regarding "windscreen" or "wind shield" terminology, it's commonly called a "canopy" or "bubble" on aircraft. I'm sticking with "canopy". Comes from the French.

 

Good point… However, it's interesting how the French breakdown the Canopy components on their Astar. They have a "Windshield"!! However, that maybe just for the U.S. market.

post-4431-127552001264_thumb.jpg

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