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simulator time/ explanation- What counts??


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I was wondering about simulator time. like what kind of simulator counts as time.. is it even worth it for hour building at all? or is it just a kind of proficiency thing... i know noting trains or feels like the real thing..

 

Also.. I know my X-plane 9 sim on my computer doesn't count as time... But it does seem to help me to stay a little tighter on the stick, and with approaches.. between flights which may be weeks or even months at a time.. But all I'm using is the stick.. Anyone know of where to get decent but cheap sim controls like pedals and a collective?

Anyone else use this themselves? does it seem to work for you?

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As I understand it, an FTD (like a FLYIT sim) can only be logged as total and simulated instrument time. Useful for practicing approaches for your instrument rating, but not cost beneficial for much else.

 

Level D full motion simulators are obviously quite a bit more realistic and can therefore be logged to a greater extent. When we take our check-rides for the S76/S92 in the sim, in addition to the full gamut of IFR procedures, we complete all the required VFR maneuvers. This includes slopes and confined areas. We even use it to do our three night take offs and landings for currency. The only thing I don't log is actual instrument time.

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We have found that students who fly the un-certified simulator unsupervised, teach themselves some bad habits. The lack of sensory cues and the unreal simulation of the do-it-yourself sims means that they are missing the true teaching points.

 

We ended up locking the little sim to prevent negative habit transfer, and any sim time is strictly dual in the certified simulator.

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I had a student come to me once with 1000+ of Microsoft Flight Simluator time. He had a separate logbook for it and everything. I wanted to laugh and call him an idiot, but then he turned out to be the best "stick" student I ever taught. I almost hated him. :)

 

I just want to make one point very clear, and I think eggbeater already made it, and that is you CANNOT count any of the Flight Sim, X-Plane, Fly-It, or Frasca time as flight time, PIC time, night time, cross country time, etc. It's sim time, and that's it. (And I even debate the use of simulated instrument time, but that's interpretive and not what we're talking about here.)

 

Finally, my personal opinion is that most of the FTDs listed above did very little for my flight proficiency. As mentioned, it's good for instrument skills, and sometimes not even that. The lack of full controls, sensory input, aircraft performance, force feedback, etc make it unreliable. I would spend your time trying to figure out how to land a 737 on Saint Barth's. (Look it up: airport TFFJ....it's awesome. :))

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As I understand it, an FTD (like a FLYIT sim) can only be logged as total and simulated instrument time. Useful for practicing approaches for your instrument rating, but not cost beneficial for much else.

 

Just a bit of clarification and that is that FTD time cannot be applied toward total time. It can only be applied toward FTD (I added a column in my logbook for this) and simulated instrument time. For the instrument rating, only 20 hours of FTD time can be applied toward the rating.

 

As for proficiency with the stick, the Fly-It FTDs fly very different from the actual aircraft, so I would avoid them for this. Fly-It is the only one I have experience with.

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Im loving all the input, thanks everyone..

Im not planning on logging any time on my at home sims.. Was basically asking about the sims( the approved ones) just to see if they were even worth the time and money, or was it better to just keep applying that money towards flying the actual thing.. I have about 90 hrs.. R22 time and Private License.

My previous CFII did make several comments about how even after not flying for a month, sometimes 2, I was his only student who could do that and still pick up into and hold a solid stable hover.. and my maneuvers weren't over controlled so to speak. He was skeptical about my "game play" on the sim at home.. But then later gave into it and thought it may have something to do with the reason I was still pretty "stick" proficient.

 

I thought about getting the collective and pedals for the PC sim.. Anyone know where to get them at a decent price? if anyone here even has them?

Thanks

Joe

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  • 7 months later...

In your experience, will companies that have a model requirement, for example: 250 hrs Astar, UH-1, etc, count time in a simulator that is for that specific model? I might have some access soon to a UH-1 full motion sim and was wondering.

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In your experience, will companies that have a model requirement, for example: 250 hrs Astar, UH-1, etc, count time in a simulator that is for that specific model? I might have some access soon to a UH-1 full motion sim and was wondering.

 

I would say it really depends. On the operator, their insurance carrier and what sim you used. Plus was it a full program or just playing around. Flight Safety and Simuflite have training programs that are accepted by almost all insurance companies. Going through one of their programs can make you insurable if you don't meet all the pilot requirements.

 

FTD's like the Flyit and the Aero Simulation Sim are good for some things. Like learning procedures. They tend to be a little less stable than the aircraft itself. Which can actually be good in learning environment. As for the UH1 sim, it would really have a lot to do with its certification and what level it is. Are you doing it under someone's program or just cadging time in it?

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I would say it really depends. On the operator, their insurance carrier and what sim you used. Plus was it a full program or just playing around. Flight Safety and Simuflite have training programs that are accepted by almost all insurance companies. Going through one of their programs can make you insurable if you don't meet all the pilot requirements.

 

FTD's like the Flyit and the Aero Simulation Sim are good for some things. Like learning procedures. They tend to be a little less stable than the aircraft itself. Which can actually be good in learning environment. As for the UH1 sim, it would really have a lot to do with its certification and what level it is. Are you doing it under someone's program or just cadging time in it?

 

Just cadging time, I haven't seen it yet but it's supposed to be one of the only full motion UH-1 sims in the US. It got me thinking about the Astar sim though, I would probably pay for that if it would be worthwhile to meet requirements.

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