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I have NO direct experience.

 

However, having been on the hiring panels for former military pilots, I would be shocked if they get over 1000 a year.

 

Most I interviewed had around 1500 after a four years. The fixed wing pilots had a little more.

 

I'm sure you will get a good idea from others with direct knowledge.

 

edspilot

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Maximinious:

 

Not having direct knowledge:

 

No, to my knowledge there is no way to "work-a-deal" with the army to get more flight time.

 

Quite frankly, the Army will not care that you have all "ratings." In the past they viewed a lot of civilian experience (flight time) as a lot of bad habits to break in their training program and not worth the effort.

 

also, no special treatment that I know of.

 

Again, hopefully others here can offer more inside knowledge.

 

 

edspilot

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Lol...thats only 333 hours a year of flight time! I would need at least 600-700 hours a year if I signed up for the 6 year commitment required by warrant officers. Looks like I am staying a civilian heli pilot.

 

 

If you're just doing it for the hours then you are doing it for the wrong reasons anyway.

 

Can you not see how heloidaho came to that conclusion?

 

Send FLHooker a PM. He's National Guard but might have a good guesstimate for Chinooks.

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Also, keep in mind that while hours are important...so are the TYPE of hours, I'd imagine. Consider how many of those hours are NVG, low-level, high altitude, combat, long-line (depending on your aircraft), etc.

 

Just something to consider.

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It's never really easy to tell someone how many flight hours you'll get. It depends on all too many factors; the airframe, the unit, the state(for national guard), the list goes on.

 

The key is both national guard and active army aviators require a minimum of 48 hours of flight time every 6 months. So, you can count on a minimum of 96 hours a year. The only way you can expect 600-700 approximately(give or take) a year is if you spend all your time deployed to the Stan.

 

The big thing with jumping into the Army is you can start flying a big twin-turbine right away, learning all about the complex aircraft. Also, jumping right into flying with NVG's, flying low-level and even formation flying.(things you may not necessarily ever see on the civilian side!)

 

The final answer: You can't really say. The guesstimate given, isn't a bad number to base off of. Don't bother joining the Army if you're mainly concerned with flight time, as the Army can sometimes take the fun out of flying!

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A majority of active army flying in the states is flying around your base reservation. After about 100 hours of that you wish you could do something else. There are plenty of times however where you'll plan a flight out and away from the base for a couple hours (fly a day route to an airport, grab dinner, then fly back to base under goggles.) Occasionally you might get dubbed for a support mission somewhere (airshow static display, flyover of an event, supporting DC airspace while the president is at camp david, etc.) But a majority of Army flying, unless combat deployed, is spent flying around your base's reservation. Its gets boring, quick.

 

There is some great experience to be had in military aviation however. A lot of NVG, night, and even some good portions of instrument flying. But not just that, the time and process of making you a great aviator as well. If you are looking to jump into EMS down the road (for example), the military would be a great way to get you started on that. But then again, you may or may not rack up enough flight hours to be illegible for that kind of position on the civilian side. It just all depends on what you are joining for.

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Also, keep in mind that while hours are important...so are the TYPE of hours, I'd imagine. Consider how many of those hours are NVG, low-level, high altitude, combat, long-line (depending on your aircraft), etc.

 

Does anyone in the military do long-line work? I think their sling work is mostly shorter lines and none of it is VR.

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Does anyone in the military do long-line work? I think their sling work is mostly shorter lines and none of it is VR.

 

And this is where my knowledge ceases. I guess I meant sling work. What length constitutes "long line?"

 

FLHooker, where the hell are ya?

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Like what multiple people said, it's the type of flying you do not the amount.

 

When we fly fire buckets, we use 100' lines plus the 20' legs on the buckets. So your looking at 120' of course. However, The pilots never see the load and it is always monitored by a crew chief in the rear. We spend a lot of time monitoring our Radar Altimeter and torque indications to get a "feel" of where the load is in reference to the ground. I believe it is more difficult to fly external loads this way because you are essentially blind and your taking verbal commands from someone else.

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Chill Lindsey, damn girl.

 

As Lindsey said, i'm a Chinook pilot in the NG. I fly an average of 150-200 hrs per year, which is pretty good. Rarely do traffic patterns (sorry Ragman). I flew over 20 hours last week on 2 missions in NY and RI. I don't know many Hawk pilots that flew more than 600 hours in country (Iraq or the Stan). The highest I have heard was around 800, but that was in a Chinook. MEDEVAC hawks usually get ALOT less, in the ballpark of 200 or so. And of course, as always, there are exceptions to it all. Instructor Pilots fly the most of all the pilots, atleast from what I have seen.

 

You have to add the fact that these beasts are not robbies or 300's or whatever. My state only has 5 Chinooks, we fly them quite a bit, and everyone has to get their's. Not even mentioning the fact, that no matter what you fly, you have additional duties that you will be expected to complete. Add in Weather, Maintenance, and other required Army functions...

 

As for long line, yes, the Chinooks do it... some. In FL we had a 100' long line on our bambi buckets, but not all units use the longer lines. Some states use around 40' or so. However, unless you get called up for a fire, we don't typically sit there and practice that alot. Maybe once or twice a year, probably higher in a state like CA, but I don't know.

 

 

My 2 cents

 

CHAD

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My experience and views are based solely on that of my active time in the Army, and none other. I'm sorry if information between active flying and guard flying got mixed up.

 

The national guard will operate a bit differently than active units. From the guard guys I've ever talked with, they always seemed to have got a bit more free reign flying in the guard.

 

Look into the guard warrant program if you are serious about joining the military.

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Did I ever state that I was doing it JUST FOR FLIGHT HOURS? lol...there is always one of you in ever forum..isn't there heloidaho? hahaha ;)

 

There are many reasons why I want to join the army, but flying is definately the most important one.

 

Order of importance for a Warrant Officer:

 

1. Soldier

2. Officer

3. Aviator

 

Yes, I hope there is always one of me. Forgive me for thinking of the military as a service with a focus on what missions are flown with the aircraft instead of how many hours it takes to accomplish those missions.

 

I realize that people are motivated to join the military by all sorts of different reasons, and that the military needs the people that are motivated purely by money or flight hours or the GI Bill. But in my experience, the best troops and people to serve with are those that are motivated for reasons beyond the benefits. It helps to have the service first attitude when there is a lot of bullshit going on, and the military certainly knows how to serve up bullshit and frustration. Like most things, there are advantages and disadvantages.

 

But I stand by my statement. If not flying "enough" hours is the breaking point for you to either join or not join, then I don't think that is reason enough to join. Even if the yearly average met your personal requirements, I don't think you should join.

 

What if there are maintenance issues, or you get injured, or any other of unforseen circumstances happen where you are just stuck being in the Army and flying 0 hours. What sort of troop would you be when your primary source of motivation is gone?

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Maximinious,

 

First off, thank you for the promotion. I hope that reflects soon in my paycheck. Secondly, good luck with your career either civilian or military. I hope that no matter which route that you take that you get the hours and benefits that you seek and that you find success.

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Maximinious,

 

First off, thank you for the promotion. I hope that reflects soon in my paycheck. Secondly, good luck with your career either civilian or military. I hope that no matter which route that you take that you get the hours and benefits that you seek and that you find success.

 

Brilliant! ;)

Edited by lelebebbel
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Hey Maxi-whatever-your-name-is,

 

I agree with some things that you say. I do agree that the military is just a job, some people join to serve but more people join for the benefits, type of work, to get into the country, etc, etc.

 

I have to say one thing though, you need to chill with the attitude. I know you have all of your ratings but have you ever actually worked as a pilot?? I hope you don't resort to name calling with people you meet on a professional level because that won't get you too far!

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All branches of the military are FULL of people that are in it primarily because of benefits and opportunity post term.

 

So true, unfortunately primary middle class americans sent to serve/die by politicians who would never consider wearing the uniform. To answer the original question, I was a couple of months shy of 5 yrs before i got my sikorsky 1000 pin.

 

All to fly a freaking helicopter, which will mostly likely become boring by the time you master the skill, isn't it ironic!

 

The ignorance that’s spewed on this forum is truly entertaining.

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And thank for the tip from expert private pilot Lindsey.

 

What? Okay, now I'm lost. What did I say that warrants (er, pun not intended) the sarcasm? I sent FLHooker over to this thread to help you out, since he obviously knew way more than I did. Maybe next time I shouldn't do that? What's with the hostility towards my advice? I told you to read...to get more information...I would have told that to anyone. The more perspectives you can get from people who have "been there, done that," the better. That's all I'm saying.

 

And I'm not even a private pilot. But, like heloidaho, I'll take the promotion!

 

 

 

Oh, and that advice you quoted is from another thread...from awhile ago. Not sure why you're directing the sarcasm at that.

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I would never even ask the question when considering joining the military...and I didnt. That is so far down the list of important considerations of this job. First off, the hours vary largely depending on number of deployments, mission (Medevac, lift, etc) and whether your RL and PIC'ed. Not to mention, that first you have to graduate top of your class to select the 60 as your airframe. Prior to all that you would have to test, interview, be selected, graduate basic training, graduate WOCS, pass about 6 PT tests on hold, graduate BOLC/SERE, not wreck your motorcycle, not get in trouble in PCB, checkrides, choose the 60 airframe....then you can start to worry about flight time... but dont ask your commander when youll fly...but I bet when your deployed you wont be nearly as focused on your logbook as you will saving your own rear end...just saying. Thanks, for listening and...sometimes you gotta come on with a little less throttle, your ripping into people will never last in the Army...when theres a turd in the group, you flush him. Ease up a bit.

Edited by NorCalHeliKid
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