Jump to content

300c or Enstrom


ftbl74
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have noticed a few more Enstrom schools comeing around and I have heard from a couple of them that I could use my Enstrom time for Schweizer time. There is a school that I am looking at that flies the R22, R44 and Enstrom. They use the Enstrom for instrument training and they say they have it to make the student more marketable cause Enstrom and Schweizers are pretty similiar. I was wondering what everyone thought on that and if I only get 50 hours in the Enstrom could I still be able to get hired at Schweizer schools? I will finish up with 200hrs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have flown both the 300 and the Enstrom. The Enstrom really doesn't fly like the 300. It has the similar type of rotor system, but that is about it. Depending on the particular model of Enstrom. First of all the rotor system on the Enstrom is a Hi inertia rotor system. Next the Enstrom 28, 28A, 28C, 280, 280A and 280C do not have coorlators. So for every movement of the collective, you have to make adjustments of the throttle. Then the Enstrom 28C, 28C-2, 28F, 280C, 280F and 280FX are turbocharged. So you will also have to deal with turbolag. Which can make the power and RPM control interesting until you get used to it.

 

Overall the Enstrom is a very stable and steady machine. You in fact trim it out to where you can take your hands of both controls and the machine will stay in the state it was when you let go.

 

The 300 is much more nimble. Personally, the Enstrom really doesn't prepare you for instructing in the 300. Things happen quicker in the 300. With its low inertia rotor, the 300 requires closer management, especially during autos.

 

Flying the Enstrom, will make you more in tuned with what is happening with your power and RPM. After about 30 to 50 hours, you will find yourself making power adjustments without even thinking about it. Then if you go to the 300, you will almost have to remind yourself that you don't need to make many power adjustments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you think Schweizer schools would hire someone with only 50 or 60 hours or Enstrom time? Thats what the school I am looking at tells me that Schweizer schools would consider me if I only have Enstrom time. I don't think any Schweizer school or Enstrom schools would take a pilot if they only had 50 or 60 hours in that aircraft.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you think Schweizer schools would hire someone with only 50 or 60 hours or Enstrom time? Thats what the school I am looking at tells me that Schweizer schools would consider me if I only have Enstrom time. I don't think any Schweizer school or Enstrom schools would take a pilot if they only had 50 or 60 hours in that aircraft.

 

Most schools only hire from within, so if you really want to fly the S300(which I believe is a Sikorsky now)I'd train at one of those schools. B)

 

Having flown both, I don't really see how time in one would help in the other.

 

In the Enstrom it was throttle, then collective, in the S300 it was just the opposite, collective, then throttle. This could get confusing going back and forth. Then, as already mentioned, there's the huge difference between high-inertia, and low-inertia rotor systems.

 

If you're so concerned about switching, does this mean that the school you're currently attending has said they cannot hire you after graduation? :huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They did stay they would hire me, wether or not I get a student really depends on the need. I am not to concerned about flying either one, its just that this school also flies the R22 and R44 so I would get time in those. I thought it would be a good school because they said if I don't get hired with them I will have the time in Robbies so I could go to a school that flies them, if not there then I could go to an Enstrom school or Schweizer school. I just want to fly I don't care what it is!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

to your original question: If you get 50 hrs. enstrom will a schweizer school hire you... NO.. you would need to have a minimum of schweizer time to instruct in it. That means at least 5 hours and most schools don't figure you can instruct reliably after 5 in type.. but IF they are desperate and need someone then they would consider you regardless of your aircraft type during your initial training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

to your original question: If you get 50 hrs. enstrom will a schweizer school hire you... NO.. you would need to have a minimum of schweizer time to instruct in it. That means at least 5 hours and most schools don't figure you can instruct reliably after 5 in type.. but IF they are desperate and need someone then they would consider you regardless of your aircraft type during your initial training.

 

 

wrongo bongo on that one.. I had never flown a 300C in my life, ALL enstrom, and turbine time.. went and did 4 hrs in a 300C, did a check flight with the CP, started instructing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I was wondering what everyone thought on that and if I only get 50 hours in the Enstrom could I still be able to get hired at Schweizer schools? I will finish up with 200hrs."

 

The Enstrom 280 can be challenging to wrangle at first. If you can tame that beast, I think you'll find the 300c is a breeze. I did about 75hrs R22 and 25hrs R44 before moving to a new school and finishing up my commercial with about 50hrs in the Enstrom 280fx. Then I did 6 hours in preparation for the CFI checkride in a 300c and was good to go. I've got about 700hrs total time now mainly split between the 280fx and the 300c. The 300c is the easiest to instruct in but the 280fx is the most fun to fly. Diversity in your flight training will help you develop a more intuitive, less mechanical feel for the controls and help you adapt more easily to new helo types and situations. Have fun and fly safe!

 

*edit*

 

"so your saying i could get a schweizer job if i only have 60 hours of enstrom time. "

 

--no one is going to guarantee you anything, and as others have already said, your best bet is to get hired at the school you train. If you're the right guy for the job at the right time with the right stuff (skills, attitude, work ethic, insurance minimums, etc.) you will get that seat... (just hope you have students to fill the other seat!)

 

--JMc

Edited by 280fxColorado
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ok, I apologize for the quip... My original statement was merely to illustrate to the OP that if you don't have any time in the type of aircraft the operator is using, you will need at least 5 in type per the far's to instruct in it.... and IF they are going to hire you, it will unlikely have much to do with you having Enstrom time as compared to something else (that is suggesting that an operator is using intelligence instead of ignorance).... I know, I know... there might be a robbie hater that would suggest that the Enstrom time qualifies you better to fly the 300 but that is total crap.

 

I just wanted the OP to understand that he is being fed a line about the Enstrom... it isn't totally true but neither is it untrue... type aircraft experience is important, but not a guarantee of anything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...