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Seating for external load


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Do I need to sit on the left side to fly external loads? I notice some aircraft that are used for external loads are left seat PIC. I was told once that this was so that you didn't have to reach for the collective and it was right under your armpit. A 369A(OH-6A)is pretty small and is right seat PIC but I think I could lean out and still reach the collective ok, although I haven't tried it yet. I assumed I needed to fly it from the other side and just reach across to start, etc. I just read some study material though which talks about sitting right side. Does it matter?

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Depends if you are doing short-line or long-line (vertical reference.)

 

Short-line or belly tank with snorkel is usually done with a mirror through the chin bubble, so it doesn't matter which seat you use, within the FM limits.

 

Vertical reference can be done from the RH seat of a B206, but the AS350 has a wider gap between the seat and the door, so it is not practical from the RHS. Some AS350 are set up with LH throttle controls and TQ meter. B212/412 have bubble windows with extra gauges in the door for left-seat vertical reference.

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I did a little longline training in a R44. While it was a reasonable reach to the collective, it still felt odd. Mostly due to the fact that your hold on the collect had changed. I also did a little in a BH47. It felt better, as my hold on the collective had not change it any great extent. I have run across a few 205's and 212's modified to allow the pilot to fly it from the left seat. That is why 500's are so popular for utility work, as the pilot flies from the left seat. The AStars use mirrors. I have tried it, but it really feels odd and takes some practice to do properly. Since you are spending most of your time watching the load, you are operating the helicopter mostly on sound, feel and instinct. At most you are giving the engine instruments just quick momentary glances. I found the 44 difficult to use in this regard. The engine instruments and markings are quite different. But then I don't have any appreciable amount of Robinson time. I found the 47 much easier to mentally capture the engine readings. It that regard, I have seen 500's that had aux warning lights mounted outside the airframe, just below the left pilot door. And engine instruments rotated on the instrument panel so that they could be read much easier by the pilot when his head is outside.

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I use a mirror on the 44. It does take an hour or two to get used to. Once you get it down it's fine. Judging height from the ground with the load can be a little tricky at first too.

 

There is another company near by that uses a camera system on their machines. Don't know it's advantages or disadvantages, I haven't seen it in use.

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Cameras only show 2 dimensions - you need 3 dimensions for depth perception.

 

From what I can find, and this agrees with what I was taught, the binocular aspects of depth perception only extend to about 20 feet, falling off the closer you get to 20.

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1st.. it doesn't matter.. it is personal preference

2nd.. in the 369a i belive you're required to fly solo from the right seat only per the rfm.

 

We use the military dash 10 manual, I double checked it but all I saw was that the right seat is refereed to as the pilot seat, nothing about limits on which seat to solo from. CG would not be a problem. I'm going to practice some VR in it before I put a line on, I'll try it from both sides.

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Our 500c is left seat pic, not flown a 500 Right pic.

No long L experiance but would think leaning out it is easier to use collective, rather than almost having to hang on leaning out of right door, still with a C18 how much can you lift

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Our 500c is left seat pic, not flown a 500 Right pic.

No long L experiance but would think leaning out it is easier to use collective, rather than almost having to hang on leaning out of right door, still with a C18 how much can you lift

 

Not much probably 700 lbs or so, we will probably use it for training mostly and maybe for slinging light loads of equipment for the power co. crews.

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