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franky17
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Safer at what?

Having an instrument ticket won't help you if the aircraft isn't equipped. It won't stop you from stuffing up an auto. It won't help you if you lose situational awareness and put your tail rotor through a tree.

 

It will help you to become a better attitude pilot. It will help you to operate in a logical, checklist-driven manner.

 

It will definitely help your bank balance to get lower.

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Even if the aircraft isn't IFR equiped it will come in handy if you go IIMC. To be able to learn how to control the aircraft with just the basic instruments is better than having no training at all.

 

Short answer, Do it.

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Safer at what?

Having an instrument ticket won't help you if the aircraft isn't equipped. It won't stop you from stuffing up an auto. It won't help you if you lose situational awareness and put your tail rotor through a tree.

 

It will help you to become a better attitude pilot. It will help you to operate in a logical, checklist-driven manner.

 

It will definitely help your bank balance to get lower.

 

 

Right Right Right. I was just wondering if there was any number out there that an IFR pilot has less weather related accidents or some number just showing that IFR pilots have less accidents in general. I am trying to put some ammo in my gun here to get someone else to pay for my IFR. I somehow managed to go through all my training without an IFR ticket, and I'm finally in a position where work will pay for it if they see it will benefit everyone.

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Um, you could try AOPA/ASF, but I'm not sure you'll get the answer want: I think their data show that instrument pilots are involved in more incidents than non (from them pushing their limitations). Maybe they break their data into survivability after IIMC for instrument vs non tho.

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Even if the aircraft isn't IFR equiped it will come in handy if you go IIMC.

 

 

I am of the opinion that having your instrument would be more dangerous in this case, in that it might make you feel confident enough to continue flight in bad weather in a non-equipped aircraft, where other pilots may make an emergency landing beforehand.

 

"Pilots, he said, believe they are less likely than their peers to run into inadvertent IMC or other problems, and better able than most to handle it if they do. This optimism leads to risk-taking, accidents and death."

 

http://www.morningtonsanfordaviation.com/articles/enough%20skill.html

 

The article is about the instrument training in preparation for a commercial but I think the logic can be applied to non-equipped aircraft.

 

I can't see how anyone would survive IMC with just a compass and an airspeed such as in a Robinson.

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I can't see how anyone would survive IMC with just a compass and an airspeed such as in a Robinson.

 

 

Shaun,

 

Trust me. They can. Granted, the CFII I know that did this killed himself in another in a seperate event. So, he got away with it once.

Edited by JDHelicopterPilot
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I am of the opinion that having your instrument would be more dangerous in this case, in that it might make you feel confident enough to continue flight in bad weather in a non-equipped aircraft

 

Getting my IFR ticket was the best thing I've ever done!

 

I understand your logic, however, I think that would be more on that specific pilots decision making and the situation rather than "any IFR rated pilot." Yes, they may have the confidence to continue flying but is it a good decison to continue flying? It very well could be. If you inadvertently enter IMC, your focus should be on getting out of it and turning around isn't always the answer. If you're aircraft isn't IFR certified and you enter IIMC, don't be afraid to declare an Emergency. ATC will probably give you headings and altitudes to follow to get you into VFR conditions, and that may mean flying through the bad weather.

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I recall some accident stories at the Robinson Course, where instrument rated pilots were trying to continue VFR into obvious IFR,(in VFR only helicopters)!

 

Not too long ago, up here, there was an accident where two pilots were trying to fly an S300 under the fog, at night (both instrument rated)!

 

The instrument rating seems to build a sense of overconfidence in some pilots, causing them to make decisions a VFR pilot would never make, especially while flying a VFR ONLY helicopter!

 

During my own instrument training I noticed that my VFR skills turned to crap, after getting used to flying under the hood, so I definitly believe it doesn't create a "better pilot"!

 

As for IIMC, if for some reason you feel the need to fly a VFR ONLY helicopter into marginal weather, knowing how to fly "holds", and "shoot approaches" ain't going to help one damn bit!

 

If you want to learn how to get out of IIMC, just add that to your Commercial recurrent training.

 

Unfortunately it doesn't really matter what any of us thinks. Insurance companies have decided for us! :(

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