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did you move for training


Natenite

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I am beginning to consider uprooting my family to go train at a school in another state as one of my options. Before I go that far I am wondering what the realities of that are. So if you would be so kind... if any of you moved cross country to go to a specific school would you share the experience. What did you do for lodging and a job. Did you just up and move or slowly establish yourself. did you rent an apartment and get a job at a gas station to pay the bills? Did you already have a job to pay the bills while training or just do it all on loans so it was done with a year or so? Any and all experiences you could share would be great. It seems like such a large undertaking but nothing is impossible and I am sure there are situations where this would be good to do so any real life stories about it would be great. Hope this post makes sense.

 

nate

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Don't get loans, especially if you have a family, student loans are inescapable, they will garnish your wages and force payments even if you are disabled.

 

Move to a flight school that fits you best.

 

Be prepared financially if you don't get a job after training.

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Best advice I ever got came from this website.

 

Pay cash for your Private rating and then re-evaluate.

 

Flying for fun or training and flying for work is two completely different things. There is an old aviation saying - " It is better to be on the ground wishing you were in the sky then in the sky wishing you were on the ground. " Sooo.... the question is, are you still going to love flying when you HAVE to do it ? 1/2 mile visibility and 300; AGL because you got socked in when the weather report looked feasible ?

 

Food for thought.

 

I wouldn't uproot my family until I could answer those questions.

 

I've also seen ballyhooing on this site about the "pessimists" - I think I would be pretty pessimistic if I spent 70k and couldn't find a job either. So take it for what it is worth and that is - market flooded with low timers, a bad economy and employers that can afford to raise their minimums.

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Nate,

 

Without knowing your current situation (job, age, family situation, financial status, earning potential for you and your wife, number of kids, etc) your question is difficult to answer.

 

Uprooting your family is a huge decision. I suggest you take the time to think about it and whatever you do, don’t make any impulsive decisions. If you do uproot, you’ll need a full-blown plan with backups and this will go without saying but a ton of cash as well. Plus, you’ll need full and unwavering support from the wife and family. Just so you know this business is not family friendly. We call it “AIDS” for Aviation Induced Divorce Syndrome so beware.

 

Having said all of this, is it a good idea to uproot? I’d say no. More than likely, you have a family support structure which is critical for your wife. Uprooting her to an apartment complex near some airport in an unfamiliar metropolitan area may put unduly stress on the family unit. On the other hand, if you do not have an established support structure and are accustomed to the gypsy lifestyle then you’d probably be good to go…. Something else to consider; do you have family living in another state which could provide a new support structure?

 

In addition to your other post, it’s not a good idea to drive 3 hours either. Maybe consider waiting a while to start your training until the economy gets a little better. Save a bunch of cash so when the time comes, you can take a leave of absence from your job and head to an established flight training school. After you complete the 8 to 12 months worth of training, then you’ll need to find a job and this is the best time to evaluate the uproot option. Furthermore, if you do not gain employment right out of the gate, then you can head back to your old job and continue to search for a flying gig. It’s important to be working and making money throughout this process.

 

My 2c

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Yeah... I moved right down to Enterprise, Alabama. The good thing is that my training came with a pay check and a flying job. No student loans needed, just a willingness to serve your country for a couple of years (and build some hours).

 

Njord

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Yeah... I moved right down to Enterprise, Alabama. The good thing is that my training came with a pay check and a flying job. No student loans needed, just a willingness to serve your country for a couple of years (and build some hours).

 

Njord

 

Am I guessing correctly that you went military? I have looked into that but since it's a long shot to get selected as a warrant officer I have looked elsewhere.

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Back in '85 I up rooted myself from MN to WY to get my A&P license, a few things I learned was when you decide to do such a thing pre-plan as much as possible i.e. find housing before hand and a job will help also as it can provide an outlet from the riggers of training. As Spike mentioned A.I.D.S can run rampant in this industry so be certain your family is willing follow you in your life's journey.

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Am I guessing correctly that you went military? I have looked into that but since it's a long shot to get selected as a warrant officer I have looked elsewhere.

 

Yeah, and if you just say "it's a long shot, I'll never get it so why bother?", then you can't POSSIBLY be selected.

 

I did the same thing, and it's the best decision I ever made, I think.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Maximinious

Becoming a helicopter pilot with a family = bad idea. You do realize that you are going to need a serious amount of cash to complete your training and take care of your family right? Do you realize how dangerous it is to become a CFI, does your family understand the risks? Be prepared not to make crap for pay for the next 4 years of your life. And lastly, you are not promised ANYTHING in this career path. Hope that helps

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Yes there are too many Pilots out there right now. If you want it really bad, do what ever you have to do. Remember, your best shot at that first job is going to be where you train so choose carefully. And your first day of training is the first day of your job interview.

Do not cancel lessons! If the weather is bad then ASK to do more ground. Then you have to look at being a CFI as paying your dues. This is when you learn the most and gain alot of experience. Get your AGI and instrument ratings. Enjoy your time flying as a student and be passionate about flying helicopters. Network with others as much as you can. You'll be surprised at how many offers to go flying you will get. Keep your priorities straight. God, family, flying. Good luck and God's speed.

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