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Getting ahead of the curve


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I am excited to start training. I want to make the best of my training and would like to start on some self study until I can start flying in a few months. I will be training in Robinsons (no matter what local school I choose). The school I am planning to attend offeres a "student package" which so far the description I have is books,pilot bag,knee board, plotter ect. So, if I will recieve these things shortly what would be the "money best spent" option to get me started. Besides obviously the vast knowledge that is found on this forum.

Edited by gary-mike
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Well, the books to get yourself started are going to be included in the "student package" that you mentioned. It usually includeds a FAR/AIM, the Rotorcraft Flying Handbook, a R22 POH, and maybe aviation weather and the pilot's handbook of aeronautical knowledge. Instead of going out and buying books to get started, I'd go ahead and get the package deal at your school so you don't end up getting two of something.

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Well, the books to get yourself started are going to be included in the "student package" that you mentioned. It usually includeds a FAR/AIM, the Rotorcraft Flying Handbook, a R22 POH, and maybe aviation weather and the pilot's handbook of aeronautical knowledge. Instead of going out and buying books to get started, I'd go ahead and get the package deal at your school so you don't end up getting two of something.

 

Some items are on line so you may not have to spend any funds on them. The FAR and AIM are on the FAA website as well has some of the FAA manuals. You can download them and print them for much less than you can buy them.

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Welcome to the rotorwing aviation addiction!

 

It is my opinion that you can actually save money if your knowledge stays ahead of your flight skill. The books mentioned by the other posters are a great way to get started. Any of the terms used in the books that you dont understand or are foreign to you, google em! You will be surprised how much you can learn by chasing down those rabbits.

 

Something else you could consider is getting your FAA Knowledge test out of the way. There are differing opinions on when its best to take the test, but I found in my training that the sooner I got that out of the way, the easier it was to complete the rating.

 

Finally, you should develop the PIC mentality right off the bat. What does that mean? Well, show up for your first flight and give your instructor a weather briefing. Arm yourself with every bit of information concerning your flight as you can. Take on responsibilities early.

 

Good luck and enjoy your training!

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You can actually save money if your knowledge stays ahead of your flight skill.

 

Something else you could consider is getting your FAA Knowledge test out of the way.

 

Finally, you should develop the PIC mentality right off the bat.

 

Awesome advice. I'd add to it that you should find a school that supports these tenets! Plenty of CFIs out there will oblige students who are too lazy to study. The result is a run up in ground lessons, followed by a run up in flight training costs "to stay current" while you catch up on the ground. If you really are ahead of the curve, beware the 141 program that makes you sit through hours of ground training for info you already possess.

 

And keep in mind that lots of CFIs out there are still developing their PIC mentality, and aren't able to put that responsibility in your hands.

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If you really are ahead of the curve, beware the 141 program that makes you sit through hours of ground training for info you already possess.

 

And keep in mind that lots of CFIs out there are still developing their PIC mentality, and aren't able to put that responsibility in your hands.

 

Crap! I am stuck with 141 do to the use of ch33 VA benefits. Oh well it is worth it for free money, and it is probably better to have a review than to not get it during the alloted class time and end up paying out of pocket... Especially since my pockets are pretty empty.

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Welcome to the rotorwing aviation addiction!

 

Any of the terms used in the books that you dont understand or are foreign to you, google em! You will be surprised how much you can learn by chasing down those rabbits.

 

Something else you could consider is getting your FAA Knowledge test out of the way.

 

Finally, you should develop the PIC mentality right off the bat. What does that mean? Well, show up for your first flight and give your instructor a weather briefing. Arm yourself with every bit of information concerning your flight as you can. Take on responsibilities early.

 

Good luck and enjoy your training!

 

Wow! I love your response, I probably would have never thought of the last 2 suggestions.

 

I just wrote a long detailed response to this post and lost it due to a sensitive touch pad, so here I am again with my shortened version.

 

The comment about developing the PIC mentality is priceless, as I said it is something I wouldn't have thought of. I think this may impress someone enough to put a student higher on the list of possible future CFII hires. Not to mention of course making you a better/more prepared student and pilot.

 

Now as for the Addiction comment.

 

I am deffinately addicted already, to the point I am starting to feel it may be unhealthy! Since I have been an aviation fanatic since I was knee high to a grasshopper it didn't take much. I went on a 3-5 min flt around the pattern, did an Intro Flt, found out I had financial options, and ever since then my head has been in the clouds.

 

Anyone know of a cure for this addiction? Or at least when I may be able to proccess a thought that doesn't some how involve helicopters? Where is the nearest HAA group?

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Sorry man.... no cure aside from completing your ratings and working your way up from there.

 

One more thing, never work for free! And yes, day one is the start of your job interview. If you treat it that way, you can increase your chances. Good luck!

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Awesome advice. I'd add to it that you should find a school that supports these tenets! Plenty of CFIs out there will oblige students who are too lazy to study. The result is a run up in ground lessons, followed by a run up in flight training costs "to stay current" while you catch up on the ground. If you really are ahead of the curve, beware the 141 program that makes you sit through hours of ground training for info you already possess.

 

And keep in mind that lots of CFIs out there are still developing their PIC mentality, and aren't able to put that responsibility in your hands.

 

 

VERY well said Chris..

 

AND, if you find yourself with one of those CFIs, remember you can 'change the channel', how will you know this? fly with other instructors all the time; we mandate a stage check every ten hours with a different CFI, lets the instructors get to know all of the students and vise-a-versa, there is NO shame in asking for a change!! (poet, lol)

 

 

dp

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