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badtransam97

Working in the GOM

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Just wondering what the status is in the GOM nowdays. What hours are the companies realistically hiring people with? What is a typical interview process like? Also what is a typical day like down there, same as the older posts on the board? I was just hoping to get some current info from GOMers working present day.

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They are definatley hiring. Bringing in guys with zero turbine time, and ones with years of experience. I would say a good 1500 hrs TT and some turbine time would give you a fighting chance. As far as the day to day in the Gulf of Mexico and interview process.... I would highly recommend watch Lyn's series on the G.O.M at justhelicopters.tv It is through the eyes of someone getting on board at Bristow, but is a GREAT insight into what the G.O.M is and can be. Keep in mind that Bristow is one of the big 3 in the gulf, so if you get on with one of the smaller's.... things may not be the same as what you see on Lyn's videos.

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PHI and Era are hiring. No turbine time required at the moment. PHI will not bend on the 100 hours of night and the more instrument time and being a double I will be an advantage. Having someone on the inside to separate you from the pile is also pretty much a must. If you get called to interview, the job is yours to lose. There is not so much an interview, but you will spend the day touring the place and learning about the company along with a short flight to an airport to see if you can fly and navigate. The written is something any CFI will ace. If you can fly, are congenial and seem like you will shut up and learn, you're probably going to get an offer. They aren't interested in spending time and money flying people down that they don't already want to hire. Oh, you'll probably need about 1200 hours or so.

Edited by helonorth

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...Oh, you'll probably need about 1200 hours or so.

 

Gee,...is that all? :lol:

 

Do you think they would consider cutting that TT in half for someone who has almost three times the night, some turbine, and who has flown over the Ocean? :huh:,... :D,... :lol: :lol: :lol: ,... :(

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I agree with Helonorth. I recently got hired in the GOM (finally!!). Everyone in my class had 1500+ hours. Tubine time not required but everyone in my class had someone who works for the company put in a good word for them.

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Gee,...is that all? :lol:

 

Do you think they would consider cutting that TT in half for someone who has almost three times the night, some turbine, and who has flown over the Ocean? :huh:,... :D,... :lol: :lol: :lol: ,... :(

 

Give it a shot butters, there have been many that said the minimums aren't an end all, you just have to convince them you are the right person for the job....And get to know some people.

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"Are layoffs common in the GOM?" From somebody who worked for PHI 1984-1997 and then left the GoM- it depends. PHI had their first ever pilot layoff in '87, 3 or 4 rounds. I would have been on the next round had things not stabilized... They had 1 or 2 more layoff cycles before I left in '97, and more since, I think. My opinion, it's not 'common' with the larger operators but it happens. It's usually "last hired, first hired", you accumulate security with seniority. Your supervisor's opinion counts too- the last round got some senior guys who'd been cross-wise for various reasons with management.

 

Some of the small operators hire and fire as they gain and lose contracts, some offer other positions when available, and things don't always 'line up' when the contract you're flying ends.

 

So: Yes, No, Maybe.

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What about 1700TT with 500 of that being FW and the rest RW? Dual rated CFII with actual SPIFR exprience in high performance airplanes? Any idea if that would help?

Thinking about retiring early from my non-flying police job.

 

Five0

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1200 rotor and some IFR time should get you in right now. If you don't get any bites, getting your ATP would be a big advantage. I used to not think so, but paying a visit to a place you want to work wouldn't hurt, either.

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So can night be combined hrs as well as the inst time? I am dual rated as well, but most of my inst time is FW, only about 25hrs is RW, and about half and half on the night hours.

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Like Wally, said, "yes. no. maybe". It changes from day to day and week to week, depending on how badly a company needs pilots at the time, and who they have lined up, or not. Nothing is written in stone.

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Yes to the night hours. There is no set amount that needs to be rotor. I don't know about the instrument, but I don't think it must all must be rotor (this is only where I work, of course). I know for the night, of the 100 hours required, at least 50 can be be FW. If you have a helicopter ATP, forget the minimums ( you will still need 1200+ helicopter), as this is what they are going for. In 4 four years in the GOM, I have flown a total of 0 hours at night. They want you to have, or be elligible to get, your ATP when you are hired.

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Any word on how RLC is doing lately? I know for the past few years they've had a bad rep (and justified from what I remember). I just haven't been back home in a while to talk to some of my contacts there.

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If I am a 1500 hour ATP is it going to hurt my job prospects if I don't have a CFII (CFI yes)? And how many turbine hours would it take for then to get interested, would 15 or 30 be enough?

Edited by HeloJVB

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I have heard the ATP is a biggie, I can't see how they would care if you have a CFII. But, that's just what I have heard from friends who work there.

 

I'm still looking for the winning combination myself though.

 

It might be turbine time (which I have very little) and offshore experience (which I have none).

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CFI or CFII is immaterial. You won't need it at all. You can instruct for the company under your ATP if you ever do get into the training dept.

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Do we have any guys working for one of the big 3 out there who commutes? Say from the West or East coast? If so, please share you troubles, thoughts, anything on the commuting situation for hitch please.

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Do we have any guys working for one of the big 3 out there who commutes? Say from the West or East coast? If so, please share you troubles, thoughts, anything on the commuting situation for hitch please.

 

I comute from the East coast of Fl. It's a long drive. Flying is an option, but requires a second car and a place to keep it in the Gulf. There are a few friendly places to park, but some you just have to break down and pay. Other than that, it's the regular issue of cancelled flights weather delays, etc.. Your employer doesn't much care so long as you show up for work.

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Here is a video series on working in the GOM. Not all inclusive, but paints a pretty good picture of what to expect:

 

http://www.justhelicopters.tv/Play/TabId/267/VideoId/234/Gomer-Working-In-The-Gulf-Of-Mexico-Part1.aspx

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Anybody commute from California? Just wondering how big of an ass pain this is for someone working in the Gulf.

 

Check this blog for some insights about commuting from California. Hal has been doing it for years.

Edited by Gomer Pylot

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Friend of mine does and has for a few years, from LA area. Got a really good deal on airfare, worked out a deal with the airline somehow. Went in on a cheap commuter car with some other guys to keep down there and they just rotate it between their hitches. If I remember right, I think he said it costs him about $2,500 a year in airfare.

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What are the prospects for a SIC position in the Gulf? What are the chances of moving up to PIC after a season? I've heard from some to never go for SIC because it's impossible to move up (The insurance requires a minimum PIC time to hire a PIC and since you're not gaining any PIC you'll never be able to move up).

 

This is my primary concern with taking a SIC job. Can you move up from SIC after a season to PIC since you'll have 1 season of experience and the turbine time to go with it? Or is it better to spend an extra year build up more hours as PIC at a flight school and going after the job once you have the hours for PIC?

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I'm just going to start from scratch about how it works where I work, as your questions don't make much sense or have bad information. This information is just for where I work.

 

As a new hire, you may be offered a SIC position in mediums if: you have an ATP or if you have experience in twins and have or meet the requirements for the ATP. If you don't have either of those things, you will be put in light ships. If you want to upgrade to mediums, you can bid into positions but you must at least meet the requirements for the ATP and you will not make captain until you posess an ATP. There are no "seasons" in the GOM. You move up when they are ready to move you up. If you are an ATP, the light ship to SIC medium upgrade could be in as little as a few months.

 

It all depends on what you want to fly. If you have your heart set on flying the S-92, get your ATP now as it will make the progression much faster. I'm guessing you are civilian low time instructor, so it will probably go like this: hire on as light ship pilot. Transition to SIC medium or S-92. Within 1-5 years, make PIC (not in the 92, though). Where I work they are hurtin' for medium pilots, especially PIC's. If you have the ATP and are a go-getter, you could easily be a medium PIC in three years from the day you are hired. They money is about the same between light ships and mediums until you make captain. It then goes up quite a bit.

Edited by helonorth
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