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David Clark headsets - helicopter compatibility?


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Looking at the list of gear I need to start school in Jan, #1 being a headseat, my question, is how do I know what to buy? What kind of plug? I on Sporty's there are some panel powered, some battery powered. I do have two sets of new in box David Clark H10-76 military headsets I was issued. Will these work on civilian helos? What else from David Clark would someone recommend?

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Stallion, I don't think you will need a headset of your own right away. I am already in school, and no one has ever said anything about having your own. If you want to get one ahead of time for later down the road, I totally understand that. I will be interested in hearing what anyone else has to say on this too.

 

whiteshadow

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As long as it's a single-pin helicopter plug, it will work in civvie helicopters just the same. I've flown with a Bose since about week 2 and never looked back. The DCs exhausted my head, neck and ears back then, and again when I had to use them for backup a few weeks ago. But if you've got them in hand, use 'em until you have the cash and experience to decide what you really want! Personally, I find using a public headset kind of gross, but that's just me :P

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Military headsets generally won't work in GA aircraft due to a difference in the mic immpedance.

 

My first headset was the David Clark H10-66 which actually has a high/low switch to go from military to GA.

 

However, for the last few years, I've used the Lightspeed Zulu, which is just freakin' awesome!

 

Also, I used the school's headsets up until after I got my Private (something that is generally recommended, in the beginning). Just a thought?

:)

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Heligirl, good point about using community headsets! I am the same way. Now that I think about it, you two have just talked me into getting my own set too! I have loved Bose products my whole life, but haven't looked at any headsets yet. hey have been on my radar though for when I do shop around.

 

whiteshadow

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Stallion, I don't think you will need a headset of your own right away. I am already in school, and no one has ever said anything about having your own. If you want to get one ahead of time for later down the road, I totally understand that. I will be interested in hearing what anyone else has to say on this too.

 

whiteshadow

 

 

Guidance Helicopters gave me a list of gear I need prior to beginning training. One being a headset, another is tan flight suits, plus a few other things.

 

 

As long as it's a single-pin helicopter plug, it will work in civvie helicopters just the same. I've flown with a Bose since about week 2 and never looked back. The DCs exhausted my head, neck and ears back then, and again when I had to use them for backup a few weeks ago. But if you've got them in hand, use 'em until you have the cash and experience to decide what you really want! Personally, I find using a public headset kind of gross, but that's just me :P

 

 

Thanks for the info. Looking around more it looks like fixed wing use dual plugs. I really want a set of Bose A20s!

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FWIW, I've seem the mil mic replaced without buying a whole new headset. You can get adapters for swapping bw the FW dual and RW single plugs and vv. I had a Bose X for 4yrs and have had the A20 for about a year now. I have a smaller head so it fits me better than a Zulu...your mileage may vary. I only wish it would match the Zulu with Bluetooth mp3 capability, other than that I love it. As for community headsets, if you saw what we wipe off ours in a day...you'd never touch one again. Blech!

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You can buy a microphone from Marv Golden, Sporty's, or any other pilot supply store. Sporty's is far too expensive for me, and I don't buy much of anything there. Marv Golden is more reasonable.

 

The impedance of the speakers may also be an issue. The 8-ohm military speakers will work, but the volume will be lower. You can also get 300-ohm civilian models, but I would try the ones you have first. The mic just won't work, though. DC does make a couple of models with a switch, so you can quickly change the impedance of everything, but I doubt the military buys those. But if you have a small toggle switch on one of the domes, you're set, just flip the switch.

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As for the plug, there are several sources out there that sell adapter plugs, even military to airplane or helicopter. Personally I prefer my own headset. When looking for your prefect headset look at all the various headsets out there. While Bose is nice, the price isn't. I went with Telex many many years ago when they first came out with their ANR headsets and I haven't looked back. The difference in noise cancelling vs price was a factor. There was almost no difference in noise cancelling between the Bose and the Telex.

 

They call DC's head vises for a reason.

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If you can spare the cash and are at all serious, buy a headset. Community headsets are kinda like sharing a drinking straw- no matter how much you wipe it...

 

I'm traditional, have had a David Clark 10-13.4 for years. Second choice would have been a Peltor: light, low-profile, and while I've never owned one, seem to be durable.

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Do they make the students wear flight suits too, or is it just in case you get hired you'll have your flight suit already?

 

Students must wear tan flight suits and instructors must wear black flight suits.

 

I'm actually looking at Sigtronics S-58H now. Can get a good deal on one through work.

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We have Bose, Lightspeed and DC on hand at Heli-Ops for our students to try, we also have two types of helmets (which we highly recommend) that you can try if you want. Shadow, come by anytime and you can check 'em out. It is a substantial investment so you want to make sure you get the right one the first time.

 

dp

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Students must wear tan flight suits and instructors must wear black flight suits.

 

I'm actually looking at Sigtronics S-58H now. Can get a good deal on one through work.

 

For your flight suit, take a look on Ebay. There are usually several available on the board, various colors, styles and sizes. Some new, some used. Earlier this year, I got a new nomex suit in tan for $35 with shipping. You can also find headsets there, but I would exercise caution buying headsets there though.

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We have Bose, Lightspeed and DC on hand at Heli-Ops for our students to try, we also have two types of helmets (which we highly recommend) that you can try if you want...

 

Are you recommending that they get a helmet, or just try one out?

 

I only ask, because I flew with a CFI once who wore one, and it looked very cumbersome (at least in an R22). In fact, I don't think I'd even be able to fit in the helicopter with one on (and I'm only 5'11")?

:blink:

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SS6113, contact Lea Bass at RHC (310) 539-0508... Tan flight suits-good prices. RP

 

Thanks for the info but I actually still have 5 pair of excellent shape desert hot weather flight suits I was issued when I was still in the military.

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DP, gonna take you up on the offer to check out the headsets. I'll come by after I put in my money for my pin. That way I can pick it up in person and you can save on postage! Thanks for reaching out! I'll get a hold of you soon.

 

whiteshadow

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  • 2 weeks later...

I use an old military DC headset. I just went over to Crazy Randy's and got a new mic. I also had an extra CEP kit in my helmet bag, and I installed it on my DCs. I like it better than the noise canceling.

 

I used Bose and DC ANRs, and they both gave me a massive headache after just an hour flight (used them for a few weeks, it never went away). I prefer the radios a little quieter than my instructor that has a Bose ANR, which leads me to believe my headset may offer greater hearing protection since I already have quite a bit of hearing loss from H-60s.

 

The civilian helos just use a single plug (same as the military plug). The mic can range from like 40 to 90 bucks (the cheaper one didn't work on my headset, it seems to be hit or miss).

 

I have a small helmet (not the green one) that I don't think I would even fit in the R22 with it on (and I'm only 5'5").

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I use an old military DC headset. I just went over to Crazy Randy's and got a new mic. I also had an extra CEP kit in my helmet bag, and I installed it on my DCs. I like it better than the noise canceling.

 

I used Bose and DC ANRs, and they both gave me a massive headache after just an hour flight (used them for a few weeks, it never went away). I prefer the radios a little quieter than my instructor that has a Bose ANR, which leads me to believe my headset may offer greater hearing protection since I already have quite a bit of hearing loss from H-60s.

 

The civilian helos just use a single plug (same as the military plug). The mic can range from like 40 to 90 bucks (the cheaper one didn't work on my headset, it seems to be hit or miss).

 

I have a small helmet (not the green one) that I don't think I would even fit in the R22 with it on (and I'm only 5'5").

 

 

R22s look really small. I won't fly the R22, since I'm going through the new R44 program with turbine transition as well. But I imagine a helmet would still not work in one of those, so a helmet is def out. I'm actually looking at buying a Sigtronics ANR headset. I flew at work the other day in an S-70i and one of our pilots let me wear his Sigtronics ANR headset for 2nd half the flight, and I wore the DC set the 1st half. The Sigtronics to me felt more comfy, and noticeably quieter, and easier to hear.

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R22s look really small. I won't fly the R22, since I'm going through the new R44 program with turbine transition as well.

 

Without completely diverging from the thread topic, I have to ask the obvious glaring question. If I read your post correctly, and forgive me if I didn’t, your training program consists of flying the R44 exclusively with a turbine transition and no R22 or S300 time. Correct?

 

What ratings are you planning on achieving and what is your goal immediately after training?

 

I ask because, unless you already have a PIC job lined up, the program you mentioned will place you at a distinct disadvantage when talking about entry-level pilot marketability… Simply put, finding a job upon completion of this training program will be extremely difficult of not impossible.

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Without completely diverging from the thread topic, I have to ask the obvious glaring question. If I read your post correctly, and forgive me if I didn’t, your training program consists of flying the R44 exclusively with a turbine transition and no R22 or S300 time. Correct?

 

What ratings are you planning on achieving and what is your goal immediately after training?

 

I ask because, unless you already have a PIC job lined up, the program you mentioned will place you at a distinct disadvantage when talking about entry-level pilot marketability… Simply put, finding a job upon completion of this training program will be extremely difficult of not impossible.

 

I exceed the 200lb dual pilot weight restriction so an R22 is out of the question. The school has an R44 program that uses that helo for the private, instrument, commercial, CFI, and CFII. Turbine transition is done in the MD500. I plan to hopefully be a flight instructor once I finish the program. So your saying you have to have S300 or R22 time to be an entry level pilot?

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I exceed the 200lb dual pilot weight restriction so an R22 is out of the question. The school has an R44 program that uses that helo for the private, instrument, commercial, CFI, and CFII. Turbine transition is done in the MD500. I plan to hopefully be a flight instructor once I finish the program. So your saying you have to have S300 or R22 time to be an entry level pilot?

 

If your school does not hire you (or if they do, but you cannot find enough students (that has happened to CFIs I have met)) then without R22 or S300 time, your odds at finding a job at another school are slim to none!

 

My advice would be to go to Bristow. They have a butt-load of S300s and students.

:mellow:

 

P.S. The weight restriction in the R22 is 240lbs per seat, however, a combination of pilot + passenger that exceeds 400lbs usually puts the CG too far forward, which is why most schools limit their CFIs to around 185lbs.

Edited by r22butters
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I exceed the 200lb dual pilot weight restriction so an R22 is out of the question. The school has an R44 program that uses that helo for the private, instrument, commercial, CFI, and CFII. Turbine transition is done in the MD500. I plan to hopefully be a flight instructor once I finish the program. So your saying you have to have S300 or R22 time to be an entry level pilot?

 

 

Currently, the most common airframe used for helicopter flight training is the R22 with the S300 coming in second. Most flight schools offer the R44 because it diversifies their fleet in order to allow for other types “missions” and not necessarily meant to be used as a trainer. It’s sometimes used as a training machine but rarely as a primary trainer due to the associated higher cost. Realistically, completing all of the certifications in a R44 is usually way out of the price range for most of us mortals. In any case, by having only R44 time, your initial marketability will be limited to R44 opportunities so while it’s not mandatory to have R22/S300 time, it’s not the best position to be in as an entry-level pilot.

I always recommend by graduation, a pilot should have a CFII and meet the SFAR requirement for the R22/44 with a fair amount of S300 time. This essentially provides you with the highest level of marketability you can achieve for an entry-level CFI position. And while some will disagree, the turbine time will do nothing for you, other than provide you with an expensive fun-factor.

Butters is right, if you’re under 240, then you’re good to go in the R22.

Talk to the fight school (owner/chief pilot) and get the straight skinny cuz this should’ve been pointed out to you, in detail, already…… If it hasn’t, then I’d suggest you consider training elsewhere.....

Edited by Spike
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I'm slightly over 240 but cutting back at the gym and hitting the cardio harder will put me under that fairly easily. The school mentioned sim training for the R22 will be part of the program, but not actual flight time in the seat. I'll have to look into it alot more this week.

 

Sorry to ask w/o searching but what is the weight requirement of a 300?

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