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Which experience builds better pilots?


r22butters
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Which method of time-building creates the better pilots, CFI, Tuna Spotting, AG, Cattle Mustering, Photos, or anything else you can think of?

 

 

 

 

 

Ok Logan, here you go, we have our own thread for everyone to see. To you I ask; From what experience with BP do you draw your opinion of their CFIs?

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A pilot that does a lot of CFI work will be a better CFI. A pilot that does a lot of photo work will be a better photo pilot. A pilot that does a lot of ag work will be a better ag pilot. See the trend. I don't think any job creates a pilot that is better then any other pilot in a respective field.

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I would think being a CFI would make a better well rounded pilot because the emphasis is on all the skills needed to be a pilot and not just mission specific one. That being said my opinion isn't worth too much as I am a not even yet a student. however I do find the best way for me to learn anything is after grasping the concept teach it to someone else.

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I think it depends on the person. What a person does may offer possibilities for knowledge and experience in a variety of areas.

 

Ultimately it is up to each person to be the best they can be, a job or a certificate doesn't make a better pilot. There are some pretty worthless CFI's who can't even read the regs.

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I would say a variety of different experience builds the best pilots. As previous respondents have mentioned, it really depends on what sort of job that particular pilot will be doing.

 

I've built most of my time doing rides, photo/video work, and later as a CFI. I'm feeling pretty well rounded to do a variety of different tasks. However, a specialized job will probably require specialized training.

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The adage goes; if you really want to learn about something, then you should teach it. This goes with just about anything.

 

There is no comparison between CFI and everything/anything else. Teaching a student pilot to fly a helicopter all the way through CFII runs the gamut of maneuvers and procedures. With that, within the training program, any instructor can simulate the additional skills needed to cover just about all of the sectors of the industry, including the time building jobs mentioned. Plus, the standards which must be maintained stays in-check by the performance of the instructor’s product i.e. the student pass or fail ratio. Furthermore, the continual practice of emergency procedures cannot be marginalized, times ten…

 

Conversely, any other time building gig does not provide any of the above. It’s just a job with zero flexibility to do anything else, other than what the job requires. This situation often creates an opportunity where pilots often form bad habits. Bad habits are difficult to break, and are quite obvious to experienced check-airmen….

 

In life itself, there are few endeavors worthwhile that don’t come with a prerequisite. Becoming a CFI should be a prerequisite for pro flying. Shoot, what other time building job offers a pilot the need to save his rear-end on a regular basis. Once you’ve saved your butt a few hundred times (if not a thousand) then, when the real deal happens, you’ll be that far ahead of the game…. BTDT..

 

Lastly, attempting to enter this business without the goal of becoming a CFI is a foolish prospect in the least. Why? Simply because the CFI gig IS the entry level flying job. To plan otherwise is a plan to fail. All other low-time “time building” jobs are so rare, they should be thought of as extinct. Especially, with today’s economic environment. ….

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I would definitely like to become a CFI and become a better pilot some day, but I've been too busy flying 500's in the mountains at max gross in the shaded area of the H-V curve this summer... ;)

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Well, before anyone gets bent out of shape by my admittedly smart-$%# comment, let me point out that I think it's crazy that a field as intolerant of error as aviation uses instructing as a stepping stone.

 

I mean, does the Army use recent flight school graduates as instructors at Ft. Rucker? No, it uses master aviators with years of experience, combat tours, and thousands of hours of flight time. Does the police academy use rookies as field training officers? Do medical schools use interns to train surgeons? Well, you get the idea...

 

I hate to say it, but this is one area where the public sector has it all over the private sector. Money makes the world go around, and in the aviation industry, it compromises training and safety too often.

 

I was serious when I said I'd like to get my CFI some day. I think it is a great learning experience that will absolutely make me a better pilot. However, as with most careers, I think OJT with a senior mentor is the best way for the recent graduate to progress to journeyman.

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^Got an opening for a 150 hr comm/instr pilot with 20 hours 206B3 longline time? :P

 

As a matter of fact, we do.

 

As long as you don't mind a 5 month stay in Quantico, VA and then 2 years on the street before you get to fly.

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R22Butters, in response to your initial question, I will state that all training beyond Certificate levels produces a more experienced pilot.

 

The best pilots will be those that accept the facts that yes, they can fly to PTS, but they will need to accept both ground and flight training for Scenarios that revolve around Missions, Environment or Locations and adjust to new airframes. Attitude and mentality will advance or hinder pilot development.

 

Once they have accomplished the preparation for a new flight experience, then they need to use Hazard ID, Risk Assessment & continuous Risk Management. The pilot that accepts these challenges and applies all of the mentioned elements will be (themselves) producing the best pilot.

 

We all have a responsibility to ourselves and others (Pax & peers) to be/make the best of flying situations.

 

I have years of experience in many operations but would never hesitate to accept ground and flight training or recurrent training prior to a mission I have not performed recently or previously. This attitude and mentality keeps me safe and humble and makes me the "Best" I can be. Maybe my "Best" is not as good as someones performance and I could learn from them but it starts with me both recognizing and accepting this.

 

Sincerely,

 

Mike

Edited by Mikemv
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As a matter of fact, we do.

 

As long as you don't mind a 5 month stay in Quantico, VA and then 2 years on the street before you get to fly.

 

Damn. There is always a catch! Haha, thanks man. That time would actually soar by pretty fast though I'd bet.

Edited by RagMan
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Damn. There is always a catch! Haha, thanks man. That time would actually sore by pretty fast though I'd bet.

 

I spent 10 years on the street and had a blast. Yeah, it seems like a blur now.

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Well, before anyone gets bent out of shape by my admittedly smart-$%# comment, let me point out that I think it's crazy that a field as intolerant of error as aviation uses instructing as a stepping stone.

 

F'kn aye Bubba! :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

I wouldn't mind teaching,...if I had around 10-20k hrs of experience from which to teach!

 

Plus, I've never liked being some Newbies' ginnie-pig! (no idea how to spell that?) :D

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Ah. Yeah, I was wondering if I missed something. Oh well :/

 

Sorry, no.

 

But things are looking dire for the Airwing. Half of our pilots become eligible to retire in the next 4 years, and there's no pipeline to replace them. We've had 8 or 9 retirements in the last 12 months - almost 10% of our strength.

 

The rest of the agency is hurting too with the lack of hiring over the past 4 years. We're going to reach a breaking point very soon - just hang in there.

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I win. ;)

 

Really?

 

I have flown with a lot of CFIs, from a lot of different companies, doing a lot of different things.

 

In my experience, as far as we "low-hour, time-builders" go, the CFIs from BP with whom I flew were just as skilled/knowledgeable as any of those of whom were, "just teaching"!

 

Since you haven't answered my question, I must assume the answer is, "none", therefore I must ask; How can you judge the abilities of someone with whom you have no experience?

:huh:

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