Jump to content

Looking for long line information


Recommended Posts

Hey Guys and Girls,

 

I'm looking for somewhere fairly cheap I can get a good introduction to VR, maybe 5 to 10 hours with different length lines... Anywhere in the US is fine but preferably somewhere in a high DA area, and I really don't care in what aircraft. Any ideas? Reviews?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

or you get hired by a part 133/137 operator who will train you for free, so you save your money

 

+1

had a friend pay for long line training. 5K down the drain. give it time, be patient, you'll be trained for free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To an extent, you don’t need a line to start honing the skill.

 

Anytime you have an opportunity to fly with the door removed, simply hover at varying heights while looking down at reference points on the surface. Getting acclimated to maneuvering the machine while looking down is the first step in any Vref training anyway. Vref is mostly about aircraft position and a steady hover…

 

X3 for the "wait to be hired" advice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To an extent, you don’t need a line to start honing the skill.

 

Anytime you have an opportunity to fly with the door removed, simply hover at varying heights while looking down at reference points on the surface. Getting acclimated to maneuvering the machine while looking down is the first step in any Vref training anyway. Vref is mostly about aircraft position and a steady hover…

 

X3 for the "wait to be hired" advice.

 

Good advice!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for the advice. Looking outside straight down at a cone/point is something I make every one of my commercial students do on a fairly regular basis, so it's definitely something I practice often.

 

I'm trying to prep myself for a Job interview and flight. I have no longline experience whatsoever and just wanted a basic intro so I could at least talk the talk and not have the first time I fly a line be on an interview. I know someone that already interviewed before me and he's given me the rundown and I will have to fly a 100' line for the interview. Now granted I know the person interviewing me will give me slack since it would be my first time flying a line, but anything I can do to help me get a job I'm going to do!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Take it for what it's worth, but flying a 100 foot line is similar to flying without a line... Just 100' higher. It certainly requires a gentle touch, however. I did a pattern with a 100' line as part of the interview process for the job I have now. He was mainly looking to see that I could learn quickly.

 

You probably won't get a whole bunch out of a 5 hour course. If you're a good stick with a gentle touch, it'll come out fine. Fly like you have a bomb on board, and youll be great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for the advice. Looking outside straight down at a cone/point is something I make every one of my commercial students do on a fairly regular basis, so it's definitely something I practice often.

 

I'm trying to prep myself for a Job interview and flight. I have no longline experience whatsoever and just wanted a basic intro so I could at least talk the talk and not have the first time I fly a line be on an interview.

 

In my opinion,

 

Being comfortable while looking down is the first step. However, attaching a 100 foot line during a job interview may toss your comfort zone right out the ole window…. Either way, just relax and be precise on the controls and;

 

When picking up and climbing, keep the hook directly over the line so it doesn’t drag across the ground.

 

Once above the load and somewhat centered, select 2 or 3 surface points in reference to the skid-tip and maintain that sight picture. As you pick the load, don’t snatch it off the ground. Slowly increase collective insuring the load comes off the ground smoothly and straight up, ala, no swing.

 

Once the load is off the ground, whatever you do, don’t stare at the load or attempt to “fly” the load. Just maintain your sight picture reference points and glance momentarily at the load to confirm its condition. It’s all about the hover, not the load. The sooner you wrap your head around this the less frustrated you will be…

 

Remember, any input on the controls will affect the load (pendulum action). Over-controlling tends to upset the apple cart so try to be as precise as possible.

 

If a swing is induced, make the correction at the top of the swing. That is, if the swing is 20 feet past center, make the correction when the load is about to reach 20 feet out. Once the swing is neutralized, reestablish a new sight picture and maintain it…

 

Just a brief couple suggestions for a Vref interview and obviously there is a lot more to this then what is mentioned above….

 

Good luck on the interview…

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back to the OP, Western Helicopters in Ontario, CA. and LA Helicopters in Long Beach both offer VR courses. LAH is in an R44, Western in a 300 or 500. I've heard good things about both programs from students.

 

Ontario is at the base of a large mountain range, with Mt. San Antonio/Mt Baldy at 9500 feet just a few miles north.

Edited by Goldy
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my opinion,

 

Being comfortable while looking down is the first step. However, attaching a 100 foot line during a job interview may toss your comfort zone right out the ole window…. Either way, just relax and be precise on the controls and;

 

When picking up and climbing, keep the hook directly over the line so it doesn’t drag across the ground.

 

Once above the load and somewhat centered, select 2 or 3 surface points in reference to the skid-tip and maintain that sight picture. As you pick the load, don’t snatch it off the ground. Slowly increase collective insuring the load comes off the ground smoothly and straight up, ala, no swing.

 

Once the load is off the ground, whatever you do, don’t stare at the load or attempt to “fly” the load. Just maintain your sight picture reference points and glance momentarily at the load to confirm its condition. It’s all about the hover, not the load. The sooner you wrap your head around this the less frustrated you will be…

 

Remember, any input on the controls will affect the load (pendulum action). Over-controlling tends to upset the apple cart so try to be as precise as possible.

 

If a swing is induced, make the correction at the top of the swing. That is, if the swing is 20 feet past center, make the correction when the load is about to reach 20 feet out. Once the swing is neutralized, reestablish a new sight picture and maintain it…

 

Just a brief couple suggestions for a Vref interview and obviously there is a lot more to this then what is mentioned above….

 

Good luck on the interview…

 

THANK YOU SPIKE!! That information is absolutely what I needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Figured I should give an update here... I was not offered the job, my friend that interviewed before me was however so congrats to him. Thank you Spike for sending the article to me, it was GREAT reading and exactly what I was looking for. Helped me out a lot!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Angel Fire. I came across this researching the advice you gave me for my old partner who looking. When I started my LL training the first few hours had nothing to do with a rope. It was hanging out, getting comfortable with the weirdness of leaning waaaay out looking down. Then went up to 10', 25, 50 and 100' hovers and coming back down over the same spot. In the 500 there is a nice little sweet spot to look for inside the skid and the strut. Then doing that same thing and throwing in pedal turns at 100' over a spot. Then moved into doing that same thing and added flying away and coming back to that spot in a 100' hover all while leaning out, looking around and learning that every little gust wasnt goin to kill me. Then went to a 55ga drum on a line and started that same routine all over. Learning to take out the swing, then getting fancy with letting it swing out to the pilot side and coordinating that with dripping it on a spot or in a trailer. But I think you could cross several hurdles with out even needing an actual line attached. I would not say Im good at it, id lean more toward adequately sufficient within my confort level associated with flying green leafy substances from A to B.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldnt spend any money on a turbine for your training. The foundations can be learned in anything. I wouldnt even pay for an R44. R22 or better yet a 300 would be the best bang for the buck. An approved 141 long line course? Meaning VA? And if you get set up with a school that insists their long line training NEEDS to be done in a turbine because of real world blah blah blah... just walk away.

Edited by Flying Pig
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldnt spend any money on a turbine for your training. The foundations can be learned in anything. I wouldnt even pay for an R44. R22 or better yet a 300 would be the best bang for the buck. An approved 141 long line course? Meaning VA? And if you get set up with a school that insists their long line training NEEDS to be done in a turbine because of real world blah blah blah... just walk away.

 

Correct, meaning VA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...