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Be Prepared for PTS changes!


Mikemv
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To All,

 

I have been networking with FAA personnel recently and discussing changes to flight training and DPE initial and recurrent training regarding PTS changes.

 

As a heads up for Pilots in Training, CFIs and flight schools I offer some information here about changes in the Airplane Pvt. & Comm. PTSs and what to expect in the Rotorcraft Pvt. & Comm.

 

Effective June 1, 2012 the Airplane PTS Special Emphasis Areas are upgraded and changes in the SRM area are made to match the IFR & CFII PTSs.

Current SEAs below:

 

Special Emphasis Areas

Examiners must place special emphasis upon areas of aircraft operation considered critical to flight safety.

Among these are:

1. positive aircraft control;

2. procedures for positive exchange of flight controls (who is flying the aircraft);

3. collision avoidance;

4. wake turbulence avoidance;

5. runway incursion avoidance;

6. CFIT;

7. wire strike avoidance;

8. ADM and risk management;

9. checklist usage; and

10. other areas deemed appropriate to any phase of the practical test.

 

Expect additions: copied from Airplane PTS

 

12. Temporary flight restrictions (TFRs),

13. Special use airspace (SUA),

14. Aviation security,

15. Single-Pilot Resource Management (SRM),

 

with SRM including:

 

o Single-Pilot Resource Management updated

o Aeronautical Decision-Making added

o Risk Management added

o Task Management added

o Situational Awareness added

o Controlled Flight Into Terrain Awareness added

o Automation Management added

 

So, everyone in training or training pilots be aware and prepared for testing changes. Aviation Safety Inspectors and Designated Pilot Examiners are being introduced to this at initial and recurrent training sessions.

 

CFI PTS will eventually also change to incorporate like items.

 

Be Safe,

 

Mike

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To All,

 

I have been networking with FAA personnel recently and discussing changes to flight training and DPE initial and recurrent training regarding PTS changes.

 

As a heads up for Pilots in Training, CFIs and flight schools I offer some information here about changes in the Airplane Pvt. & Comm. PTSs and what to expect in the Rotorcraft Pvt. & Comm.

 

Effective June 1, 2012 the Airplane PTS Special Emphasis Areas are upgraded and changes in the SRM area are made to match the IFR & CFII PTSs.

 

Current SEAs below:

 

Special Emphasis Areas

Examiners must place special emphasis upon areas of aircraft operation considered critical to flight safety.

Among these are:

1. positive aircraft control;

2. procedures for positive exchange of flight controls (who is flying the aircraft);

3. collision avoidance;

4. wake turbulence avoidance;

5. runway incursion avoidance;

6. CFIT;

7. wire strike avoidance;

8. ADM and risk management;

9. checklist usage; and

10. other areas deemed appropriate to any phase of the practical test.

 

Expect additions: copied from Airplane PTS

 

12. Temporary flight restrictions (TFRs),

13. Special use airspace (SUA),

14. Aviation security,

15. Single-Pilot Resource Management (SRM),

 

with SRM including:

 

o Single-Pilot Resource Management updated

o Aeronautical Decision-Making added

o Risk Management added

o Task Management added

o Situational Awareness added

o Controlled Flight Into Terrain Awareness added

o Automation Management added

 

So, everyone in training or training pilots be aware and prepared for testing changes. Aviation Safety Inspectors and Designated Pilot Examiners are being introduced to this at initial and recurrent training sessions.

 

CFI PTS will eventually also change to incorporate like items.

 

Be Safe,

 

Mike

 

Talked with my POI earlier this week and we discussed the changes. He agreed with my thoughts that the Helicopter PTSs will propably include the same additions within the year. With a posibility

some additional items. Since I am in the process of making a few changes to my current training course outlines and my checking plans of action, I plan to incorporate those changes within them. My POI has no problem with that. In fact he likes the idea that I will be ahead of the curve. Which will make their approvals much easier.

 

I am happy to see the FAA has included wire strike avoidance in the airplane material. After years of hiding their heads in the sand, it is about time.

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Rick1128,

 

Kudos to you for making so many industry people aware of the wire strike dangers for airplanes and how their accident rates are higher than helos!

 

Mike

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Rick1128,

 

Kudos to you for making so many industry people aware of the wire strike dangers for airplanes and how their accident rates are higher than helos!

 

Mike

 

AMEN! It's a start.

 

But, be aware that helicopter wire strikes and related collisions have higher rates of fatalities and severe injuries to the respective occupants.

 

 

-WATCH FOR THE PATTERNS, WATCH FOR THE WIRES-

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AMEN! It's a start.

 

But, be aware that helicopter wire strikes and related collisions have higher rates of fatalities and severe injuries to the respective occupants.

 

 

-WATCH FOR THE PATTERNS, WATCH FOR THE WIRES-

 

Actually, what I found from the NTSB database was that the fatality rates for airplanes and helicopters that were not conducting low level work were almost the same. Within a percentage point. Around 53%. When you look at airplanes and helicopters doing low level work, the fatality rates drop. Airplane rates dropping by about half and helicopter rates by about a third. Why? I can only come up with the following reasons:

 

1. Majority of pilots doing low level work are wearing at least a helment. Many are also wearing

nomex.

2. They are usually not conducting their low level work at high speeds

3. They have usually conducted some sort of survey (ground or flight) prior to doing the work

4. Modern spray airplanes are designed for pilot surivability. For helicopters, that is a

engineering challenge.

5. The pilots doing low level work are more aware of the wires and the damger they present.

Edited by rick1128
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