Jump to content

Accident and Fatality Comparison Charts


Recommended Posts

Are these charts showing number of accidents vs. number of 100 airframes produced? If that is so, it does not show how much they are flown per accident or fatality!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@PTK - perhaps, but the ratio of R44 fatals to accidents looks not so good.

 

@adam32 - Correct. See Type Certificate Data Sheet 4H12.

 

I was thinking the same thing. They don't crash as often as most airframes, but if they do say your prayers. From the information given it looks like it is just talking about airframes and not hours flown etc. But I could be wrong

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would be nice to see rate per 100K flight hours for each as another comparison baseline...makes a huge difference in terms of operational tempo, as well as if it's a 1 fatality per 100K or 6 fatalities per 100k. JMHO.

 

-WATCH FOR THE PATTERNS, WATCH FOR THE WIRES-

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also I would like to see the environment they are operating in when the crash happened, AG, Teaching, Longline etc. Is it possible that the big difference in the R-22 and R-44 crash worthiness is the area of operation it is mostly used in? I could be wrong but in my experience the R-44s are used to do more commercial work other than flight training than the R-22, as in photo shoots, transporting people, giving rides etc. And that may cause the helicopter to be operating close to the limits of the aircraft, meaning less forgiving situations and in the shaded regions of the H/V curve. Thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wanting the accidents/fatalities per 100k flight hours won't get it for you. I don't think such data exists, since the FAA doesn't require, nor collect, such data. They have no idea how many hours any Part 91 aircraft flies, nor any Part 135 aircraft that I know of. It's something everyone wants, but nobody can come up with.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bet the insurance companies have that data. Perhaps a few well placed phone calls can get you what you are looking for? Then again... Maybe not. Insurance companies tend to keep their data to themselves. I would venture to say though, that a good way to tell how safe a particular type of aircraft really is would be by it's insurance premium when compared with comparable types.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wanting the accidents/fatalities per 100k flight hours won't get it for you. I don't think such data exists, since the FAA doesn't require, nor collect, such data. They have no idea how many hours any Part 91 aircraft flies, nor any Part 135 aircraft that I know of. It's something everyone wants, but nobody can come up with.

 

The Australians do, although only for Australia obviously. There is an annual mandatory survey for registered aircraft owners here. You have to fill out hours and also break them down between different types of operations (private, aerial work, ag, charter...).

Quite an interesting read actually. Out here, Robinsons actually average more hours per airframe than any other helicopter, although this could be different in the US, too.

 

http://www.bitre.gov.au/publications/ongoing/general_aviation_activity.aspx

 

Comparing this to the accident stats creates a bit more useful accident/safety statistic, although there are still problems (for example, pilot experience isn't reported)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Would think the No of fatals would be hugely influenced by type of flying, pleasure V commercial & within commercial the use eg. VIP, long line, power, agg, etc.

Also the percentage of the individual fleet that is used for riskier work

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed! Look at the number of accidents in 500's! Is that because so many operators use them in such hazardous work (powerline patrol, powerline repair, long line).

 

You don't see many operators using R22's for longline!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because they are the only airframe you stand a chance of walking away from when you pursue those endeavors.

I obviously never want to crash, but if I did, I sure hope I'm flying a 500 when I do.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thats why I have one + it is fast & agile, love it

Ps. not looking to crash either, but as you say the egg protects you.

Goldy have not seen you on the camera recently :rolleyes:

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thats why I have one + it is fast & agile, love it

Ps. not looking to crash either, but as you say the egg protects you.

Goldy have not seen you on the camer recently :rolleyes:

Long live the egg, and God save the egg !

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...