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Type Ratings?


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I have a question about type ratings!? If you graduate from a school with all your certificates/licenses, and your rated in either an R22/44 or 300, how do you move on to bigger helicopters for instance an EC-135/145, AS350/355, Bell 212/412, etc........ Do you have to pay for the specific type rating out of pocket or if you meet the company's requirements do they pay for the type rating?

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Not sure what you're asking, as none of the listed aircraft require a "type rating" in this country. If you get your FAA certificates, you have your certificate, it's not limited to whatever you're flown before. If you then pursue a position with hiring experience requirements that are time, type and phase of industry specific, you're providing the minimum listed or you're usually not going to be interviewed or considered.

It's not unusual for a job to require PIC time consisting of xc, night, or whatever, and stipulate that you must satisfactorily complete training in the particular airframe. The employer will often provide that training in-house or contractually. I've never fronted the cost of an airframe transition, I've worked in most of those types you list.

 

Don't know how it works in JAA situations.

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There is a difference between light rotorcraft and heavy rotorcraft (+12,500lbs). But technically you can get your private in R22 and immediatly jump into a Twin Star and fly off. The only other thing is companies would like you to have a turbine transition and some training in their bird before you start flying for them, but it's more of an insurance and safety thing rather than being a FAA regulation.

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Not sure what you're asking, as none of the listed aircraft require a "type rating" in this country. If you get your FAA certificates, you have your certificate, it's not limited to whatever you're flown before. If you then pursue a position with hiring experience requirements that are time, type and phase of industry specific, you're providing the minimum listed or you're usually not going to be interviewed or considered.

It's not unusual for a job to require PIC time consisting of xc, night, or whatever, and stipulate that you must satisfactorily complete training in the particular airframe. The employer will often provide that training in-house or contractually. I've never fronted the cost of an airframe transition, I've worked in most of those types you list.

 

Don't know how it works in JAA situations.

 

If the aircraft has a MGTW of 12500 pounds or less, a type rating is not required unless the aircraft requires two pilots (by the type certificate) for VFR flight. There are other requirements that apply to airplanes or powered lift only. JAA requires a type rating in each make and model and some of the JAA countries get even pickier. Like a B206B2 is not a 206B3. Other countries like Canada have endorsements for each type.

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The R22/R44 are basically "type rated" due to SFAR 73 (you get some dual in them, and they give you an endorsement).

 

For countries like Canada, I imagine its like getting turbine time here in the States (you can pay for it yourself, but if a company wants you, they'll train/endorse you)?

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The R22/R44 are basically "type rated" due to SFAR 73 (you get some dual in them, and they give you an endorsement).

 

For countries like Canada, I imagine its like getting turbine time here in the States (you can pay for it yourself, but if a company wants you, they'll train/endorse you)?

 

Eagle, the SFAR endorsement is not really a type rating. An official type rating would be placed on your pilot certificate. Plus you would have to measure up to the Practical Test Standards for a type rating which is ATP standards. And goes beyond what the SFAR mandates. It is really just an endorsement. In fact the SFAR calls it an endorsement.

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  • 3 months later...
However, when you have to be trained, endorsed, current, and biennially reviewed in both helicopters to fly both helicopters, you may as well call it a "type rating"!

 

I have several type ratings, and the items that you identified are basic currency requirements. They're nothing like achieving a type rating. My last type took over six weeks.

 

You don't need a flight review in both kinds of helicopters, incidentally. Just one.

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