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Hello everyone, I am looking for some professional advice from experienced pilots where I won't get biased opinions from school instructors. Any advice, good or bad, is GREATLY appreciated.

I am 23 years old, and have approximately 60 hours in R22's with a student license. I'm am trying to decide whether to continue flight school or not (my last flight was two years ago, due to lack of funds and a couple other issues). As most of you know, it's a lot of money to go through school to get a license. If I were to not succeed in becoming a commercial pilot for whatever reason, I would be in big financial trouble.

Here is what I need your opinion on.

I have had this "cracking" in my hands for about four years now. They crack constantly but so far have NEVER become a hindrance to anything I do. They have also not become better/worse over time. I have been to every kind of doctor immaginable and no one can figure out what the problem is. I am: #1-Worried that they will find out what the problem is in the future and I will have to take some medication that would prohibit me from flying. #2- The cracking increases and I become unable to fly. So far though, it has just been an annoying thing I have learned to deal with.

I also have some pretty big issues with multi-tasking. So far in my 60 hours flying, I havn't had any problems. However, that is just as a student pilot. How significant of a role does multi-tasking take in flying professionally?

The only other issues that I feel threaten me becoming a pilot is my mild alergies and radio shyness (to the tower, etc). Neither of which I am too worried about. My allergies aren't significant enough for me to even take any meds for, and I would assume radio shyness would pass in time.

Even though I would absolutely love to be a professional pilot, I can't afford to go partly or all the way through school and have one of these things stop me from finishing. Like I said, I would be financially done for. So in your professional opinions, do you think I should continue, or are the negatives to big to risk it?

Thanks for ANY advice!

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If you can't afford to pay to play...you are already done for.

Crackity hands...no prob

Radio shy...no prob

Mild allergies... No prob

 

Can't multi task....major problem.. But maybe u can learn

No money...major problem...but maybe u can earn!

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I'll give you my two cents...since you're asking. I'm working with 3 now, was 5 a few weeks ago ( the other two still have no work ), out of work CFI's. There are a couple hundred others out there with NO WORK !!! When you become a commercial pilot, that doesn't mean you'll become a paid to fly working pilot, but, it also doesn't mean you will not either...it's a very big roll of the dice my friend, think looooooonnnnnggggggg & hard about what you're about to do. BTW, when you do become a commercial pilot, you'll still be broke.

No one really wants to tell new wannabe pilots not to go for it, I'm not saying that, but, what I am saying is, there are lots, I say LOTS, of out of work, can't find work, will not get work, can't kill for work ( but would ) broke commercial pilots flipping burgers, washing cars, sweeping hangers, picking their nose, kicking themselves in the a$$, walking around all of North America as you read this !!! If you go for it, you better make dam sure you're smarter and better than a whole lot of other guys out there trying to do the same thing.

 

Good luck, wish you lots of luck, hope you have luck, you better, cause you're gonna need it brother. Oh yea, one more thing, make sure you're fit & trim, mid 20's to mid 30's & good looking.

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If you can't multitask, you really, really need to look at other vocations. Even during light workloads, a pilot has to multitask, and when you get into controlled airspace, especially IFR, you simply have to multitask all the time. You'll never progress without an instrument rating, and that is the epitome of multitasking. If you haven't flown in years, you'll be essentially starting from scratch when you start again, so the hours you already have are worth very little. Your muscle memory is probably gone, and while some of the tasks will come back, it will take time. Think carefully before you invest thousands of dollars more.

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Maybe you should ask your instructor for an honest assessment of how you are compared to your peers at the same hour level. I don't think poor multitasking at 60 hours is uncommon. When I was starting out it took so much of my attention to hold a hover and make a radio call that if I couldn't add 2+2. Well, that's an exaggeration, but I remember flying and my instructor asking me something like "If your flying 60kts, then how many knots will you have traveled in 3 minutes and I couldn't or wouldn't figure it out with the sticks in my hand. Set it down and I had it figured out in 2 seconds, since it's pretty simple. Eventually flying the machine becomes second nature and free's up your brain to do more tasks.

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You asked, so I’ll provide (an opinion that is). However, it’ll be Ol Blue Eyes…

 

First off, with comments like these I feel a lack of true desire.

 

“I'm am trying to decide whether to continue flight school or not”

 

Folks in this business who succeed usually don’t have to “decide” because they can’t see themselves doing anything else. Therefore, if you feel like you’re on-the-fence, then steer clear of this business..

 

“If I were to not succeed in becoming a commercial pilot for whatever reason, I would be in big financial trouble.”

 

Every pilot takes a huge financial risk attempting to become a pro. However, even for those who make it, most suffer financially in the beginning. For some, it will continue through the middle and others it lasts forever. It’s known as pay thousands to get paid hundreds....

.

“I can't afford to go partly or all the way through school and have one of these things stop me from finishing. Like I said, I would be financially done for.”

 

Again, flying helicopter is not a financially sound endeavor. Most do it for the love of flying and financial gain is waaaay down on the list. Simply put, your first job (if hired at all) will no doubt put you in a financial hardship situation and attempting to start training with a hardship is just dumb. Basically, if finances are a concern, then you can’t afford it…..

 

The two most important things you’ll need to create a “best case scenario” for success are time and money. Not having sufficient amount of either of these elements is yet another reason to steer clear.....

 

Hands and allergies: nobody here is a doctor (that I know of). Go visit an FAA Doctor (AME) and see what he has to say.....

 

Radio shyness and multitasking: As stated, you already have time in the environment. Flying helicopters requires multitasking and radio work. If you have the 60 hours then you’ve already accomplished these elements…. Therefore, you’ll need to go a little deeper and provide a better explanation of what you’re asking…. That is, you’ve done this already so what gives?

Edited by Spike
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You asked, so I’ll provide (an opinion that is). However, it’ll be Ol Blue Eyes…

 

First off, with comments like these I feel a lack of true desire.

 

“I'm am trying to decide whether to continue flight school or not”

 

Folks in this business who succeed usually don’t have to “decide” because they can’t see themselves doing anything else. Therefore, if you feel like you’re on-the-fence, then steer clear of this business..

 

“If I were to not succeed in becoming a commercial pilot for whatever reason, I would be in big financial trouble.”

 

Every pilot takes a huge financial risk attempting to become a pro. However, even for those who make it, most suffer financially in the beginning. For some, it will continue through the middle and others it lasts forever. It’s known as pay thousands to get paid hundreds....

.

“I can't afford to go partly or all the way through school and have one of these things stop me from finishing. Like I said, I would be financially done for.”

 

Again, flying helicopter is not a financially sound endeavor. Most do it for the love of flying and financial gain is waaaay down on the list. Simply put, your first job (if hired at all) will no doubt put you in a financial hardship situation and attempting to start training with a hardship is just dumb. Basically, if finances are a concern, then you can’t afford it…..

 

The two most important things you’ll need to create a “best case scenario” for success are time and money. Not having sufficient amount of either of these elements is yet another reason to steer clear.....

 

Hands and allergies: nobody here is a doctor (that I know of). Go visit an FAA Doctor (AME) and see what he has to say.....

 

Radio shyness and multitasking: As stated, you already have time in the environment. Flying helicopters requires multitasking and radio work. If you have the 60 hours then you’ve already accomplished these elements…. Therefore, you’ll need to go a little deeper and provide a better explanation of what you’re asking…. That is, you’ve done this already so what gives?

 

Ditto!

 

I'll give you my two cents...since you're asking. I'm working with 3 now, was 5 a few weeks ago ( the other two still have no work ), out of work CFI's. There are a couple hundred others out there with NO WORK !!! When you become a commercial pilot, that doesn't mean you'll become a paid to fly working pilot, but, it also doesn't mean you will not either...it's a very big roll of the dice my friend, think looooooonnnnnggggggg & hard about what you're about to do. BTW, when you do become a commercial pilot, you'll still be broke.

No one really wants to tell new wannabe pilots not to go for it, I'm not saying that, but, what I am saying is, there are lots, I say LOTS, of out of work, can't find work, will not get work, can't kill for work ( but would ) broke commercial pilots flipping burgers, washing cars, sweeping hangers, picking their nose, kicking themselves in the a$$, walking around all of North America as you read this !!! If you go for it, you better make dam sure you're smarter and better than a whole lot of other guys out there trying to do the same thing.

 

Good luck, wish you lots of luck, hope you have luck, you better, cause you're gonna need it brother. Oh yea, one more thing, make sure you're fit & trim, mid 20's to mid 30's & good looking.

 

Again, ditto!

 

By the way, at 60hrs you should already have your PPL!

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By the way, at 60hrs you should already have your PPL!

 

Not necessarily true. There can be all sorts of mitigating circumstances that might hold an individual back. Let's stop making blanket statements like this and discouraging people. The average has been about 60-70 hours for many years now and it hasn't really changed that much. Saying he should be done right now when he may be very close may encourage him to quit when he is within grasping distance of his goal.

 

To the OP:

 

Finish your rating if you can. Then take a break. Make your financial situation work for you. Save money. Keep your goals in mind. You are still young. Many pilots start their careers later in life. I'm almost 30 and just recently got back into flying after a 6 year hiatus. Sometimes that's what it takes to get your priorities straight. The rest is fixable.

 

Take care of business, don't dig yourself into a hole you can't climb out of, but don't lose sight of your dreams either. Best of luck to you!

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Not necessarily true. There can be all sorts of mitigating circumstances that might hold an individual back. Let's stop making blanket statements like this and discouraging people. The average has been about 60-70 hours for many years now and it hasn't really changed that much. Saying he should be done right now when he may be very close may encourage him to quit when he is within grasping distance of his goal.

 

Dude hasn't flown in two years, he ain't close to anything!

 

Unless you're at one of those schools on the "200hr plan" where their phylosophy is, "it doesn't matter how many hours it takes, you need 200 anyway", there's no reason to go 20hrs past the minimum,...unless you're taking two to three years to get it, flying twice a month!

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Dude hasn't flown in two years, he ain't close to anything!

 

Unless you're at one of those schools on the "200hr plan" where their phylosophy is, "it doesn't matter how many hours it takes, you need 200 anyway", there's no reason to go 20hrs past the minimum,...unless you're taking two to three years to get it, flying twice a month!

 

I disagree. I think with effort and ability from the student, coupled with a regular schedule (preferably twice a week or more) the Private rating can be achieved in minimum time. Definitely. But that is not often the case. Most students don't have a "free" schedule. I certainly didnt' Took me two years and 70 hours to get my PPL fixed wing. I did my PPL Helicopter add on in minimums but only because I was flying 3 days a week or more and had taken out a loan to cover my training. Took me 10 years to pay that off. Not everyone can make that happen. Life happens. Sounds like life is happening to the OP and it is making him wonder if a career in helicopters is really for him. Maybe it's not. But I don't think its reasonable for you or anyone else to tell him that he should have his PPL by now.

 

The averages are there for a reason. They have not changed in 10 years +. They are about the same for fixed wing. Minimums are just that... MINIMUMS. It usually takes most people a little bit more than the minimums to get everything dialed in. For people facing other challenges, like our OP, it might take 20 hours more. Or 30. It all depends on how much effort gets put in. It's not all on the school. The instructors can only work with what they're given.

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