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Helicopter rental with commercial license


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Hey ive done some searching but i couldnt find specifics on what i was looking for.

I recently graduated from army flight school as a uh-60 pilot. I will have my commercial RW w/instrument rating on wed from the FAA. My uncle wants me to take him out flying one day and offered to pay for a rental. I have aprx 130 hrs and no solo time. I'd like to know what a good rental would be and if i need a medical exam to rent or if my signed army physical would work. Ive read somewhere it could be used as a class 2 but im not sure if i need more than that.

 

I think a local school rents 44's, are they pretty fun to go out and cruise around in? Would i be considered a student even though i am commercial rated? I just dont want to sound like an idiot when i call one of these places about wanting to take a passenger out. Im fine with going up with a CFI with us. Thanks for the help im pretty new to civilian aviation

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FAR Part 61.23 - Medical Certificates: Requirements and Duration

 

...

 

(b ) Operations not requiring a medical certificate. A person is not required to hold a medical certificate—

 

...

 

(9) When a military pilot of the U.S. Armed Forces can show evidence of an up-to-date medical examination authorizing pilot flight status issued by the U.S. Armed Forces and—

 

(i) The flight does not require higher than a third-class medical certificate; and

 

(ii) The flight conducted is a domestic flight operation within U.S. airspace.

 

You would need to have a CFI on board in order to fly an R44 or R22 unless you meet the requirements listed in SFAR 73, which you don't. You could probably rent any other type helicopter after a school checkout. Sit down with your local school and see what your options are. Don't be afraid to ask questions. It doesn't make you look bad. Getting into something you are not informed about makes you look bad.

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So basically since I'm not exercising my privileges as a commercial pilot a Class 3 should be all that I need to go up which my Army Physical will cover.

 

I plan on calling the school I was looking at on wednesday and maybe going up there to talk with them about doing a rental in the next couple weeks. I just wanted to get some basic info so I knew what to expect when I talked to them. As an Army aviator risk mitigation is engrained in me so I don't plan on doing anything that i am not comfortable with or don't completely understand. Thank you for the help.

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So basically since I'm not exercising my privileges as a commercial pilot a Class 3 should be all that I need to go up which my Army Physical will cover.

 

I plan on calling the school I was looking at on wednesday and maybe going up there to talk with them about doing a rental in the next couple weeks. I just wanted to get some basic info so I knew what to expect when I talked to them. As an Army aviator risk mitigation is engrained in me so I don't plan on doing anything that i am not comfortable with or don't completely understand. Thank you for the help.

 

Because of the SFAR, you would be better off getting some time in a 300, you could probably rent one after 10 hours or less training in it.

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I was really just looking at a rental for a 1.5 or 2.0 flight. I can get on our flight schedule at the unit whenever i want to fly but i cant take anyone with me so this was more like a special occasion thing. It will be weird having to fly and using the pedals for anti tq agin. The uh-60 comes up to a hover by pressing the trim switch and pulling collective. Fps maintains heading and my feet are just resting on the pedals. It should be a f un time flying something small again and actually having to hold a hover lol. Really looking forward to a fun experience!

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I would take a CFI if you only want to go for an hour or two, especially with no solo time or time in a machine like a 44. I'm sure they will want you to fly a few hours with a CFI to rent you a helicopter anyway.

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Sorry i guess "rent" a helicopter might have not been correct terminology. Im aware that he would have to ride in back. I dont think my uncle would mind riding in back considering most heli tours have everyone riding in the back. Im going to call on wednesday and just make sure they have a 44 they have for students because they also do tours with the 44. This will be my uncles first time up so i think it will be something he will remember for a long time, even if im just technically a student flying with a CFI. I know for you civilian guys its no big deal but army pilots rarely share their flying experience with family members so this will be a fun experience for both of us

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If you have you uncle with you, and have a CFI... You could really blow his mind and at some point land, let him jump up front with the CFI and let him experience first hand what you had to learn by flying it for a bit.

 

That could just be the pilot in me though... Rides are cool but hands on is priceless!

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I looked into doing the same thing as a UH-60 pilot. A lot of points to consider have already been mentioned but I'll repeat them anyway and add a few more:

 

- Your Army medical will cover you for the type of flight you're interested in.

- You can rent an R-44 with a CFI and fly with passengers in the back.

- If you want to fly with just you and a passenger without a CFI (your uncle probably doesn't care, but if you're taking a date out on a flight it's kind of lame to have a CFI tagging along), you might want to try to find an S300. The only requirements will be from the flight school. They may be a lot for a 130 hour pilot, maybe not.

 

If you want to do it in an R-22 or R-44 you'll need at least 200 hours total time and 10 hours in the aircraft just to meet the FAA's SFAR 73 requirements. You'll also most likely need to attend Robinson's factory safety course in order to carry passengers (ask the flight school, there are some that don't require this). It's more work, but if you get that all done you'll have a much easier time finding helicopters to rent.

 

Also if you're going to take that route, try to get your CFI out of it. You won't actually be able to use it in Robinsons until you have 50 hours in them, but your Army unit will be really impressed by it.

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If you fly with a CFI, you are "chartering" a helicopter, not "renting" it. You should let your uncle sit up front and you sit in the back.

 

Now if you really want to take your uncle, and other people, for a helicopter ride on occasion as the pilot, then find a reputable school with 300's and get checked out in it to rent it yourself. This is what I did a few years ago. Now I rent a 300 two or three times a year just to take friends/family for sightseeing rides.

 

Talk to the school and find out what their requirements are. Your limited flight time might be an issue, and flying a piston helicopter will take some getting used to as well. Plan on about 2 hours of instruction to get the hang of it.

 

But if this is something you would like to be able to do more than just once or twice, then consider it an investment that you'll enjoy for years to come.

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If you fly with a CFI, you are "chartering" a helicopter, not "renting" it. You should let your uncle sit up front and you sit in the back.

 

Now if you really want to take your uncle, and other people, for a helicopter ride on occasion as the pilot, then find a reputable school with 300's and get checked out in it to rent it yourself. This is what I did a few years ago. Now I rent a 300 two or three times a year just to take friends/family for sightseeing rides.

 

Talk to the school and find out what their requirements are. Your limited flight time might be an issue, and flying a piston helicopter will take some getting used to as well. Plan on about 2 hours of instruction to get the hang of it.

 

But if this is something you would like to be able to do more than just once or twice, then consider it an investment that you'll enjoy for years to come.

 

If you "charter" the helicopter, the operator must hold an Air Taxi Certificate and only company qualified PICs are permitted to touch the controls. Initially you will not be able to "rent" a helicopter. You will want to take flight instruction from the company CFI after completing SFAR requirements along with anyone else that will attempt to fly the helicopter. Of course the SFAR only applies to R22/44 helicopters.

 

Call or visit the helicopter operator about all of this. They will tell you if it is possible and what is required. Be sure to tell them if someone other than you wants to fly. Get a log book entry for SFAR instruction if you take it. It can be done on a sticky for later entry into a civilian log book.

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Why do so many people on these forums try to make things so complicated all the time? Is it just an e-peen measuring contest that I'm missing?

 

The op said he doesn't mind going with a CFI.

 

No matter who has controls, it's going to be dual given. It's not a rental, charter, ride, or a gift from god. It's dual instruction. No medical, safety school, or checkout required. Like mike said, SFAR endorsement/briefing required... Just like a discovery flight. That is a simple process.

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If you want to do it in an R-22 or R-44 you'll need at least 200 hours total time and 10 hours in the aircraft just to meet the FAA's SFAR 73 requirements. You'll also most likely need to attend Robinson's factory safety course in order to carry passengers (ask the flight school, there are some that don't require this). It's more work, but if you get that all done you'll have a much easier time finding helicopters to rent.

 

 

This is probably a good time to ask this, but reading through SFAR 73 for the R22 specifically, it gives two situations for acting as pilot in command:

 

(i) Has had at least 200 flight hours in helicopters, at least 50 flight hours of which were in the Robinson R-22; or

 

(ii) Has had at least 10 hours dual instruction in the Robinson R-22 and has received an endoresement from a certified flight instructor authorized under paragraph (b )(5)...with flight reviews required every 12 months thereafter.

 

So maybe I'm reading this wrong, but it seems like he wouldn't need 200 hours, just 10 in addition to the part 61 requirements?

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This is probably a good time to ask this, but reading through SFAR 73 for the R22 specifically, it gives two situations for acting as pilot in command:

 

(i) Has had at least 200 flight hours in helicopters, at least 50 flight hours of which were in the Robinson R-22; or

 

(ii) Has had at least 10 hours dual instruction in the Robinson R-22 and has received an endoresement from a certified flight instructor authorized under paragraph (b )(5)...with flight reviews required every 12 months thereafter.

 

So maybe I'm reading this wrong, but it seems like he wouldn't need 200 hours, just 10 in addition to the part 61 requirements?

 

Correct, all he needs is 10 hrs dual and an endorsement to be pic.

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Technically yes. But not likely. Most schools will not let you take passengers without having completed the RHC Safety Course. And many will not let you rent unless you trained with them. Talk to your local school to see what their policy is.

 

Realistically true, but since all he wanted to do was take his uncle up for a ride, chances are all he got was the awareness training before going up, then the cfi was probably on the controls with him most of the time while his uncle sat in the back and enjoyed the view!

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