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richeh123

building turbine time in experimental??

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Tradford- I love feeling your enthusiasm for the Mosquito or a Helicycle. The Mosquito is a nice helicopter, but in my opinion is no comparison to the Helicycle. I have been flying my Helicycle for 3.5 years now and it has very minimal maintenance. It is built like a tractor. Sure, it sucks fuel but I can fly 150 miles easily. I would not have a screaming 2 stroke keeping my butt in the air. The Mosquito does excellent auto rotations, and so does the Helicycle. Each has its advantages, but my decision wasn't even tempted by a Mosquito.....I built my Helicycle and it has taken me on many cross country trips and always returned me back without incident.

 

I heard similar testimonies from many other Helicycles owners when I was considering which to buy.

 

 

Stan

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"All the way" up to 5,280 feet ?

Sir I am appalled at the inference..... It was purely to spread the joy and love of aviation. Makes no difference that I'm now married to one of the girls I took flying :).

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One of the guys at the Mosquito fly-in does own/fly a Helicycle, though it wasn't there. I think the HC is a great looking ship as well and would love to see one up close. Regarding the Mosquito - I got the sense that the air cooled two stroke was ultimately going to be replaced with the larger, water-cooled two stroke. I got that it was less of a maintenance hassle and considerably stronger (definitely sounded better). One of the owners had performed the conversion from air to water cooled and it looked very clean. He's a pretty big guy and his Mosquito lifted him effortlessly and a rate of ascent that I'd have a hard time competing with in an R-22.

 

I'm not compelled to build my own ship. After I've gotten my rating and sell my Cobra, I'll start looking seriously at my next move. I'm more convinced than ever that owning a solo machine make better financial sense than continuing to rent a commercial helicopter. The experimentals (particularly the Mosquitoes and Helicycles) don't seem to stay on the market very long suggesting that recouping the investment is highly likely.

 

Rotorway was having their event just up the road in Lake City at the same time and in retrospect, I wish I'd visited them as well.

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Rotorway was having their event just up the road in Lake City at the same time and in retrospect, I wish I'd visited them as well.

Here is a thread on the RW gathering. Weather was a factor (that's why I didn't go) but attendees had a good time. Not sure if non-members can access (so I reposted):

 

http://www.rotorwayownersgroup.com/forums_c/showthread.php?t=8580

 

 

"

Re: Spring Gathering 2014

 

I'm glad all that attended had a good time. Weather afforded us some quality time at the house and hanger to get better acquainted. I noticed a lot of new faces which is always encouraging for our small group. Tentatively I've set the date for our Fall Gathering October 24-26th. I also have a new web site Rotorway-Rework.com please check it out as time allows. I am still working on some of the "bells and whistles" as well as some corrections. I'm always open to suggestions to improve it. Thanks to Rotorways Darron Braymiller I handed out Tee shirts and hats with the new company logo. This is a first for RWI to support this event and hopefully it will continue. Once again it was our pleasure to host this event and Cil and I appreciate all the help provided by attendees to make seem so smooth. We burned 260 gallons of MoGas with Rick Ferrin the biggest user.

 

Bob"

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One of the guys at the Mosquito fly-in does own/fly a Helicycle, though it wasn't there. I think the HC is a great looking ship as well and would love to see one up close. Regarding the Mosquito - I got the sense that the air cooled two stroke was ultimately going to be replaced with the larger, water-cooled two stroke.

The MZ engine is taking a beating on PPC, trike and gyro forums...was curious what the Skeeters were saying. They virtually killed the Hirths....shame...cool concept.

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That's a great thread.

 

But I wonder what would have happened if he was flying his HC for all those years...it's bound to have helped?

 

It's easy to see that 400 hours six years ago won't get you anything...or six months ago for that matter. But if you're flying twice a week and have 1000 hours...seems better.

 

Not far from an ATP which is also bound to help.

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I am just getting ready to start my flight training, and I also an looking at buying a turbine mosquito. However, I am in a slightly different boat. My flight training is being paid for by the military. At 32, I am a little too old to Do the flight warrant path. However, through the post 9/11 GI Bill, the military will pay for me to go to a college for 3 years. I found one in Georgia (where I am from) that puts you all the way to CFII through the school. It is a rather significant financial advantage to not have to take out any student loans for my certification. I am considering buying a turbine mosquito and mounting a small camera rig to it so I can use it for aerial photography in order to help pay for it (using my Army Boots to business loan guarantee). The hours that I log doing that won't be the same as the flight instructor hours, should I be able to find such a job, but at least it will be something. There is a lot of demand for aerial photography in the area. It's not quite the same situation as the original post, but that's just me adding my two cents.

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I am just getting ready to start my flight training, and I also an looking at buying a turbine mosquito. However, I am in a slightly different boat. My flight training is being paid for by the military. At 32, I am a little too old to Do the flight warrant path. However, through the post 9/11 GI Bill, the military will pay for me to go to a college for 3 years. I found one in Georgia (where I am from) that puts you all the way to CFII through the school. It is a rather significant financial advantage to not have to take out any student loans for my certification. I am considering buying a turbine mosquito and mounting a small camera rig to it so I can use it for aerial photography in order to help pay for it (using my Army Boots to business loan guarantee). The hours that I log doing that won't be the same as the flight instructor hours, should I be able to find such a job, but at least it will be something. There is a lot of demand for aerial photography in the area. It's not quite the same situation as the original post, but that's just me adding my two cents.

 

you might want to check this out with your fsdo before you invest. good luck.

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More and more people around the world are switching to drones for this…probably here too eventually.

 

There remains some dispute about uning EABs for such uses. My guess it would vary from FSDO to FSDO.

 

http://amablog.modelaircraft.org/amagov/2012/10/21/can-i-use-my-model-aircraft-to-do-aerial-photography/

 

http://www.oshkosh365.org/ok365_DiscussionBoardTopic.aspx?id=1235&boardid=147&forumid=175&topicid=4060

 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/drone-pilot-challenges-faa-commercial-flying-ban/

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Nobody pays for that stuff like you'd think. Google earth, "birds eye view" or my brother and his FAA certificated drone with its camera and downlink. Think of the money you'll need to recoup the costs in selling pictures.

 

This is an advice site... So I'll offer some. For those who think you are going to build 1000-1500hrs of "turbine time" in your helicycle I'm telling you that you are wasting your money and your time on a fantasy thinking you've found the road less-traveled. And the people telling you it's a good idea dont know what they are talking about. "At least it's something" when you are talking about flight experience equates to nothing.

 

If you have one for travel and adventure of flight, great go for it. If you are planning on using it to move into this industry it's not going to work.

 

It's like a guy buying a Cessna 150 and putting 2000hrs on it thinking he's going to land an airline job. It's not how it works.

Edited by Flying Pig
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What's the worst that can happen? You end up with a thousand hours and no one will hire you? Then just sell the helicycle, lease an R22, and start your own flight school.

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Yeah and a few years down the drain that you'll never get back, money for fuel, maintenance, etc only to start back at step 1. Yeah.... What's to lose?

Edited by Flying Pig

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What's the worst that can happen? You end up with a thousand hours and no one will hire you? Then just sell the helicycle, lease an R22, and start your own flight school.

That's not even close to being the worst thing that can happen.

 

Having the blades come off in flight causing you to crash into a school bus full of lawyer's kids, killing several and causing you to be a quadriplegic burn victim; fighting off lawsuits for the rest of your life would be much worse.

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I am just getting ready to start my flight training, and I also an looking at buying a turbine mosquito. However, I am in a slightly different boat. My flight training is being paid for by the military. At 32, I am a little too old to Do the flight warrant path. However, through the post 9/11 GI Bill, the military will pay for me to go to a college for 3 years. I found one in Georgia (where I am from) that puts you all the way to CFII through the school. It is a rather significant financial advantage to not have to take out any student loans for my certification. I am considering buying a turbine mosquito and mounting a small camera rig to it so I can use it for aerial photography in order to help pay for it (using my Army Boots to business loan guarantee). The hours that I log doing that won't be the same as the flight instructor hours, should I be able to find such a job, but at least it will be something. There is a lot of demand for aerial photography in the area. It's not quite the same situation as the original post, but that's just me adding my two cents.

Seems like hog hunting has more potential then photo shoots. We are getting overrun here in the south. Family killed last month when they hit a hog. In my area, when you fly over they are everywhere...and the population is growing. Need a certified heli for that...I believe...but could be wrong.

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Yeah and a few years down the drain that you'll never get back, money for fuel, maintenance, etc only to start back at step 1. Yeah.... What's to lose?

 

You make aircraft ownership sound like punishment!

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You must forgive my statement. I think I might have been slightly misunderstood. When I said "at least it's something," I didn't mean that it would make me more marketable. I meant that it would help me on a more personal level. As someone who has only taken one flight lesson (and admittedly, could not hover the R22 for more than a few seconds before it got all out of balance on me) that there is no such thing as having too much stick time . Aerial photography was just a way that I thought of to help pay for it. I don't expect to really make a living out of it. I don't know about hog hunting in GA. I've never seen a wild one where I am from. Ultimately, my dream is to be an EMS pilot. I know that it's a long and hard road to get there. I am also thinking about changing over to the guard as a Kiowa mechanic to get my A&P certification. That might help me get a foot in the door. Not sure if that's true or not, but it seems logical to me. Perhaps someone here has some insight on that? I will be the first to admit that I know very little of this industry. My father was a fixed wing guy, but I fell in love with rotor when I was deployed and flew everywhere in Blackhawks, Chinhooks, and Pave-Lows. I am not here to be a know it all, please don't misunderstand me. I am here to learn and to meet people who have been where I am now. As always, any advice it's greatly appreciated.

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I would also love to fly for offshore oil rigs. Umm not really worried about a high paying job right now. My wife is a bartender, and my oldest is still about 12 years away from being ready for college. I have about 16 years of experience as an automotive tech to fall back on if needed to keep the family afloat. My father once told me that the best way to make a small fortune flying was to start with a big fortune, so I definitely have no delusions of grandeur.

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First off, thank you for your service to our country….

Secondly, as already stated, this is where you can get advice on flying helicopters and, if working as a pro-helo pilot is your goal, you should be extremely careful which advice you listen to. With this being said, the path your’re proposing will not get you there. That is, the endeavor you seek has an established path which will increase you odds of success. Stray from that path and your odds will diminish exponentially. Realistically, the path to success is simple and it basically should go like this: utilize your GI bill to gain CFII certification. GET your certification at a flight school that has a good reputation and is busy. Once you gain CFII certification, get a job as an instructor, hopefully at the school where you trained. After building time as an instructor, you’ll advance into the entry level turbine market and the time building process starts all over again. After accumulating a couple, to a few thousand hours, the employment opportunities, like an EMS job, will be easier to come by…..

Thirdly, even though flying an experimental may be a “personal thing” like you say, I’d suggest redirecting that energy to becoming qualified and employed as this takes a ton of time, money and energy. You, as a husband and father, will have other important things to do on top of becoming a pro-pilot. Additionally, this business is not kind to speculators as many who thought they invented a new avenue to success often found themselves no longer involved in helicopters………..

Lastly, yes an A&P certificate will help and, when considering the bulk of this thread, an A&P would enhance your qualifications over flying an experimental by a factor of 10…………..

 

Good luck and choose wisely......

Edited by Spike

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Thank you for the input. I really like this, having a place to get some no-bs assessments of ideas. I must admit, I am a little confused about turbine transition. Everywhere I have looked had spoken of it as a course, but here it's spoken of more as a job. I have also gotten a few ideas from the pilots I grew up around. Not sure how many of them would work in the helicopter field, but first thing is first. I will be starting school this fall. I am really looking forward to all the insight I will get from here and hope that along the way, I will collect wisdom that I can pass forward. Glad I joined and looking forward to many conversations, and many nights of picking up bits of knowledge that y'all so willingly share.

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It's all part of the package. No extra charge.

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The turbine transition is a course that is offered to teach people the difference between a piston engine helicopter and a turbine engine helicopter.

 

Most people regard that training as a waste of money because whatever company you will work for will train the people what they need for free and the hours that you get during your flight school training are insignificant.

 

That being said, the VA approves those courses to be covered for the post 9/11 GI bill, and schools love VA money, so they get a turbine helicopter and get the government to pay for it.

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