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After viewing so many posts on VR, I've been surprised to discover that so many, especially the civilians, have come from varying backgrounds from blue collar Joes to suit and tie guys.

 

1. What type of job did/do you have prior to selection/applying?

 

2. What was the driving factor behind your decision to pursue WOFT?

 

 

For me, a typical office job here hacking away behind a desk. Mostly administrative stuff. My driving force is two-fold and simple; the opportunity to serve and the enjoyment of flying.

 

Curious to know yours.

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I served in the Army from 92 - 2001, then worked in the civilian sector as a Network Engineer from 01 - 03, ventured into the Air Force for 3 years until I was accepted for WOFT in 06. I have been back in the Army since 06.

 

Even thought I come from a family of Army helicopters pilots, I never wanted to fly. I've just never felt the "thrill" people talk about from flying. What drove me to apply for WOFT was the mission of Army Aviation. I wanted to be an integral part of the combat team, and in my eyes flying in support of the ground guys was the best way of doing that.

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11 years of public safety from police dispatching to the last 9 years being an EMT/firefighter on a 911 response ambulance.

Sadly it took the first 4 years of my public safety career to realize that I truly love aircraft much more than anything I've ever known thus far or can predict for the future. It has a magnetic effect for me and I love it.

My career in public safety and family in the military lead me to serve others and the nation for flight instead of civilian route

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1. Worked in the gun industry since 2003 as well as instructing fixed wing. Started flying in 1998.

 

 

2. I'm third generation military aviator. When I was younger PRK was not accepted. When that changed I joined up.

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1. What type of job did/do you have prior to selection/applying?

 

I worked for a few years on the flight line. First at a smaller airport where I helped manage the FBOs flight line program, then at a larger airport where I was just an average line tech. I did a lot of work at the second airport with airlift and ENG helicopters and it sparked my interest in rotary wing. I was also in school at the time and taking flight lessons for a while.

 

2. What was the driving factor behind your decision to pursue WOFT?

 

To become a military aviator, which is something I had wanted for a long time since reading books about military aviation as a child. I wasn't doing very well in school so I needed a way to do it without college. I also ran out of money pursuing my civilian ratings.

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1. What type of job did/do you have prior to selection/applying?

 

Currently work for the worlds largest custody bank as a regional supervisor in a brokerage division. During college I was the captain of our baseball team and baseball pretty much ran my life from age 14-23. Shoulder surgery aka my waiver battle, combined with my age, shot down any hopes of going pro.

 

2. What was the driving factor behind your decision to pursue WOFT?

 

I've wanted to fly since I was a kid. Parents bought me my first flight simulator (Jane's) when I was about 10 years old i think. Combine that with going to army football games and every airshow my parents could muster up and the desire to fly just kept building. Took my first helicopter ride over Niagara Falls when I was 9 I think. Funny thing was when the pictures from my camera were developed, there were absolutely none of the waterfall, but an entire roll of the instrument panel and exterior of the helicopter (an MD500). The desire to fly never diminished and its been like an itch I cant scratch. Stumbled upon WOFT while reseaching OCS(I thought only west pointers and OCS grads got to fly). So here I am.

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I currently own a gun shop of sorts, I am a home based FFL who specialized in custom manufacturing and special order guns (basically I build guns and sell them, and will occasionally order guns for people, I do not have inventory). My wife and I are currently investigating the possibility of moving to a full retail brick and mortar shop. WOFT may stop that.

 

At my day job, I work for an engineering firm where I'm in charge of the 3D laser scanning department. I am currently looking to move to a higher paying engineering firm where I can earn more money, and pay of bills quicker.

 

My desire to go WOFT comes from my desire to fly rotary wing. Never cared much for fixed wing (even though I recently started looking at getting my PPL just to have fun with on the weekends). When I originally looked in to getting my civilian rotary wing ratings, the price tag about knocked the wind out of me. I love the idea of Military aviation, but always thought you needed a full college degree to do it. When I found out about the WOFT program, and that I didn't need a degree to do it, I was all about it! It seemed like the perfect job, getting to fly helicopters, and having an awesome mission to do.

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Wondering if anyone wouldn't have even considered the Army if it weren't for flying?

 

Hey man I'm not trying to pick on you and I know you've already been selected but I've noticed a trend in your current posts that seem to indicate your heart may not be "green."

 

As an Army Aviator you are somewhat shielded from the stuff that happens "across the street." Meaning you're given quite a bit more freedom and sheltered from the B.S. That said, there always seems to be an effort to blend the force and reel us in. You're not going to be sporting big bright patches, colorful helmets, flashy wings, etc. In fact aside from a uniform that looks a little different than the normal ACU, the warrant officer rank, and a small black set of wings (if you even wear them), you will look like any other joe.

 

Your time will be consumed by mindless training, boring tasks, and various activities you never thought you'd be doing when you were a civilian. You will be required to do PT, qualify with your weapons, stand in formations, sleep in the woods, do ruck marches, lay out equipment, unpack and pack things, clean the building, set up equipment, sit through powerpoint class after powerpoint class... The list goes on.

 

Life is good as an Aviator. In fact it's GREAT. We have it easy. But you have to embrace the shitty stuff that comes along with the good stuff and if your heart's not in the Army you're going to hate being an Aviator here. Think hard about the dream vs. reality.

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1) What type of job did/do you have prior to selection/applying?

Currently I am attending college for a BS in business management and a BS in managerial accounting. I went to school for all the wrong reasons, mainly football and after suffering a few injuries realized that it was time to move on with life. I am also appealing to the school board to let me attempt an aeronautical science minor in a single semester and upon their acceptance I will graduate in 3 1/2 years. During my summers, I work as a Wildland Firefighter and have detailed with the Hot Shots for a summer.

 

2) What was the driving factor behind your decision to pursue WOFT?

Since football has been my main focus in life since if was about 8, I am in search of another brotherhood to be apart of, and I could think of no tighter knit crew than the Army. Also, as it seems to be with all kids, I have wanted to fly since I was young. Although it was only distant dream until last summer while fighting fires, a couple of ex-military helicopter pilots working bucket drops for my crew, quite literally saved our lives. This experience just solidified the dream and helped me decide that I want to be that wonderful sound of rotor wash to someone else, because it was the greatest sound I ever heard.

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Somewhat off topic before I throw myself in here; Just wondering how often pilots get range time to shoot rifles/hand guns (m16-m4/m9)? If you like to shoot, are there ways outside of standard weapons quals, as Buzzkill mentioned, that you can take advatage of that? And is there any personal preference for the service pistol, or just issue?

 

1) I had several jobs while going through college. Most notable to me was for a Part 135 DoD contractor. Allowed me to meet many pilots and other pros in the aerospace/defense industry. In addition to work, I also held exec officer positions with two univ. student orgs. as a Preseident and Vice Pres. for a few years. After graduating, I immediately began knocking out the CFI-A/CFII and started instructing part time and worked for a big corporate company (figured Id get some utility out of my degree, the office deal isnt for me).

 

2) No single driving factor; Always wanted to become a military aviator and did everything I thought possible to set myself up for an OCS type selection. It worked and couldn't be more excited to start. I specifically chose the Army for similar reasons as others here, mainly the ground support aspects and overall mission spectrum that Army Aviation fulfills. These aspirations became increasingly solidified over time as I gained exposure to many types of military aviators... Army ended up #1 on my list.

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Wondering if anyone wouldn't have even considered the Army if it weren't for flying?

 

Must of missed the part where I did almost a decade in the Army as enlisted. A large number of pilots have enlisted time.

 

You might want to rethink your mentality towards what it means to be an aviator in the Army, and who you are supporting. You are not the great god in the sky, you are a tool to be utilized by the ground force commander and ground element as they execute their mission. If you want to walk around in a flight suit, and let everyone see your shiney aviator wings, you picked the wrong job.

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After 3 years in the Air National Guard I did a tour in Afghanistan in support of the 1st Infantry Division. After flying from FOB to FOB in Blackhawks, Chinooks, and various civilian rotary wing aircraft, I knew without a doubt I wanted to be more involved in supporting the guys that are actually risking their lives every day. Being a pilot was one of those dream jobs that was "too good to be true", but after talking to some MEDEVAC pilots on our FOB, I decided to go for it. Now, after almost 5 years in the Air Guard, I will ship out for WOFT, and I couldn't be happier!

 

As for civilian side, besides college, I spent time as a roofer, as a fiber optic installer, and even as a waiter at Joe's Crab Shack!

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First time posting here, been lurking for a while.

 

I've always wanted to fly, I know it's the standard answer, but all so true. When I first graduated college, I wanted to join OCS but the recruiter refused to attempt a medical waiver (hardware in elbow). Fast forward 6 years, most of the hardware is removed, and started to research opportunities to get in the air. That combined with finally finding a recruiter that is willing to help, has led me on this journey. I've started gathering documentation for WOFT, and hope to have everything completed (with exceptional scores) for a summer/fall board.

 

I currently hold a position in technology management, but I was in technology consulting for some time prior. Honestly the main thing that kept me going at the consulting job was the promise of travel. I think I clocked over 160k skymiles in 2012. Now that I'm chained to a desk, I'm itching to get back in the sky.

 

I've already learned so much from this forum, and look forward to learning more and being able to help others embark on their journeys.

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1. What type of job did/do you have prior to selection/applying?

 

2. What was the driving factor behind your decision to pursue WOFT?

 

1). I was a college student/traditional Reservist since 2004. I started toying with the idea of WOFT after my first deployment at the end of 2007. My mother convinced me to go back to college to finish since I was already enrolled. I contemplated OCS and or ROTC grad school option. In my last semester of college, I was called up for Iraq. By the time I got back to finish school, OCS had downsized by like 75% and most of the scholarships/contracts for ROTC had been given out (I returned in the springtime). Two months later later I was offered an AGR position in an Airborne CA unit. I took it as a stopgap for unemployment post college. That leads to #2.

 

2). I was in the AGR program but unhappy. I knew I could stay in and get a retirement, but I didnt' want to do a desk job anymore. Thats what kickstarted my WOFT packet. It would be a seamless transition from AGR to active. Unlike gambling to go to OCS or back to grad school, in which I would hope and pray for an Active Duty commitment. I spoke to a lot of pilots and got to work with a lot doing non-standard aircraft JM duties etc. I actually decided to actively pursue a packet in December 2012 and finally put it in in September 2013.

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Somewhat off topic before I throw myself in here; Just wondering how often pilots get range time to shoot rifles/hand guns (m16-m4/m9)? If you like to shoot, are there ways outside of standard weapons quals, as Buzzkill mentioned, that you can take advatage of that? And is there any personal preference for the service pistol, or just issue?

 

Our STRAC manual requires most aviators to qualify twice a year with their assigned weapon(s). For most aviators that's the M9 pistol but can also include the M4 Carbine. It's not exciting, usually you get about 40 rounds per range, not nearly enough to get good. Now on deployments all the rules go out the window. My last two trips to Iraq I fired 50-100 rounds through my M9 every day plus the M249/M240B and others. Most aviation warrants shoot very little during their careers; it's just not important to the army to let you shoot small arms. Tearing up targets with the Apache makes you forget about small arms pretty quick though.

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Our STRAC manual requires most aviators to qualify twice a year with their assigned weapon(s). For most aviators that's the M9 pistol but can also include the M4 Carbine. It's not exciting, usually you get about 40 rounds per range, not nearly enough to get good. Now on deployments all the rules go out the window. My last two trips to Iraq I fired 50-100 rounds through my M9 every day plus the M249/M240B and others. Most aviation warrants shoot very little during their careers; it's just not important to the army to let you shoot small arms. Tearing up targets with the Apache makes you forget about small arms pretty quick though.

Roger that. So any 'extracurricular shooting' is on the individual, given not deployed to combat zone? And the more I think about it..., the more I want to select 64s. Have NG Apache base in my hometown, took a field trip there when I was like in 5th grade, remember climbing on them and asking one of the pilots what his machine gun could do. Responded with " its more than enough to split this 150' runway in half and anything in between".... Still sounds pretty cool to me.

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When I was at Campbell I shot my personal guns once a week. The training the Army gives, besides a few select schools pilots dont go to, sucks.

 

My troop was pretty good about shooting. We would go to the range about once a quarter, get a LOT of ammo, and do actual training.

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When I was at Campbell I shot my personal guns once a week. The training the Army gives, besides a few select schools pilots dont go to, sucks.

 

My troop was pretty good about shooting. We would go to the range about once a quarter, get a LOT of ammo, and do actual training.

 

I can second this. I had to buy my own 92FS so that I could 'makes friends with it'.

Add in the cost of ammo and it gets expensive. But I got sick of going from another handgun with a better fit to the Beretta. So I got my own and try to stay proficient with it. I have gotten to the point that I truly enjoy shooting it. YMMV.

And Yes, the Army doesn't really teach marksmanship or focus on small arms proficiency, other that making sure that blocks are checked on training slides.

I envy the Marine Corps in this respect very much.

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What kind of job did I do?

I joined the army at 17 and been a MH-47 crewmember for the last 6 years.

 

What's my driving force?

I joined the army to become an Apache pilot. I wanted to join the military since I was a little kid and came to the conclusion that I needed to be a aviator in the army. Now I'm finally in flight school making it happen!

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