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I have read on here several times that in a 206 it's better to have the wind on the left side. This is opposite of a Robinson yet the rotor configurations are the same.

 

Anyone have a decent explanation.

 

I'm guessing it has something to do with that giant vertical stabilizer and a much bigger tail rotor. TR VRS should be the same though.

 

Thanks

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I have read on here several times that in a 206 it's better to have the wind on the left side. This is opposite of a Robinson yet the rotor configurations are the same.

 

Anyone have a decent explanation.

 

I'm guessing it has something to do with that giant vertical stabilizer and a much bigger tail rotor. TR VRS should be the same though.

 

Thanks

 

No, the opinions were true for the Robinson too. The opinion is valid if you're power limited.

 

The explanation is in the first post of the following topic:

 

June 2013 Post: Myths and Crosswinds and Know-It-Alls

 

Don't take Notice SN-42 as a limitation, it clearly states, pilots should be aware of conditions that may require large or rapid pedal inputs.

 

Learn the characteristics on both sides, left and right; however, don't forget the best wind is a head wind during takeoff/landing and hovering.

 

 

 

Quote

Safety Notice SN-42

 

Issued: May 2013

 

UNANTICIPATED YAW

 

A pilot's failure to apply proper pedal inputs in response to strong or gusty winds during hover or low-speed flight may result in an unanticipated yaw. Some pilots mistakenly attribute this yaw to loss of tail rotor effectiveness (LTE), implying that the tail rotor stalled or was unable to provide adequate thrust. Tail rotors on Robinson helicopters are designed to have more authority than many other helicopters and are unlikely to experience LTE.

 

To avoid unanticipated yaw, pilots should be aware of conditions (a left crosswind, for example) that may require large or rapid pedal inputs. Practicing slow, steady-rate hovering pedal turns will help maintain proficiency in controlling yaw. Hover training with a qualified instructor in varying wind conditions may also be helpful.

Edited by iChris
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A wind from the left will make the aircraft want to yaw left to point into wind.

 

To stop this, the pilot reduces the amount of left pedal he is using ( or moves his pedals a little to the right - but you will almost never have right pedal forward, only less left pedal.)

 

This will reduce the amount of power being sucked by the tail rotor, and make more available to the main rotor, and this is a desirable thing if you are heavy. Most people in a heavy machine will run out of left pedal before they ever run out of right pedal. And as stated above IT IS NOT LTE. Unless, that is, LTE stands for Lack of Training and Education.

 

The charts of undesirable wind directions are largely a tin-plating exercise by Bell. In 15,000 hours of flying, 7,000 of which were in the B206, I never once ran out of pedal, regardless of where the wind was from. Because I was aware of how much pedal I had in reserve, and how fast that reserve was getting eaten up, with the need to fly away and get some airflow over the fin.

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Thanks guys for clearing this up. This makes so much sense, I am bummed that I could have been tricked so easily all this time by my mentors and that I never put this pieces together on my own. I will do my small part to reduce the right side is better myth. I spent some time with each of my students this week showing them the pedal positions and power being pulled for each wind quadrant. I have always taught that the effects of a left crosswind are manageable and self correcting. The key is to know it's going to happen.

 

I think the myth comes from the drive to keep it smooth coming in and new students don't have the feet going fast enough to keep up with a left crosswind oscillating yaw. A right side approach is easier to fly.

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  • 1 year later...

Always train for the hardest. Learn what its like in a safe environment to run out of pedal.

Anyone can fly into easy places in good conditions.

You only truly learn by testing limits if its safe to test them.

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You only truly learn by testing limits if its safe to test them.

So, which limits do you suggest that newbies test out?

Vne?

Max AUW?

Max TOT on startup?

Rearward CG?

Minimum fuel with one boost pump failed?

And when is it safe to do this? When nobody is watching?

 

The only thing you learn by testing limits, if you survive, is that limits are there for a reason.

 

Yes, it is possible to approach a limit, but unless you are a qualified test pilot and have taken appropriate precautions, don't go TESTING limits.

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  • 2 months later...

Good to jump right to the irrational post there eric.

Now how about exercising a little common sense.

 

Do you really learn anything except that scenery is beautiful cruising along at 3000 feet agl on a cavu day 1k pounds under gross?

 

Now lets say an electrical fire broke out....do you instinctively know what to do because you have read and memorized the procedures, and just sat on the ramp and familiarized yourself with every switch and gauge. Or is your plan to fumble around for the poh and start reading?

 

The tail rotor scenario is really not any different than any other thing to learn. Go hover high up above a big empty field or something on a windy day, pointed into the wind. Now slowly yaw in both directions as far as you can....or if the winds not really strong, and you down run out of pedal then hopefully at least your nearly out of tr authority.

Feeling comfy with what that is like after some practice....and how it feels as you approach the limit great.

Then 1 up it by turning so far the wind is now suddenly past the direction of yaw and turning you the other way and learn to control it.

It is like most everything in life, practice makes perfect.

 

Do you think a great sailor only ever sailed down wind on a light breeze day on a small choppy sea?

Or did he have to learn also to tack upwind in a storm to return to port.

 

If you only ever practice to do the easy peasy stuff.....may God have mercy on your soul and your passengers souls, when something is less than ideal conditions.

 

Practice for the worst....pray for the best...

 

I thought i knew how to fly pretty well at 500 hours...thought i was damn good at 5k hours......now realize i still have a lot to learn as I approach 22k hours.

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