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With all the flight schools offering different types of training aside from the norm(private, instrument, commercial, CFI, and CFII) what other training should a new pilot try to get. For example night vision, long line/external load, mountain flying, turbine transition...

 

Also, does it really matter which piston helicopters you train in? Is turbine time during training going to be beneficial down the road?

 

In other words,, after the schools are done feeding you their sales pitch, what's the most essential training and in what aircraft?

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In my opinion, at a minimum, new pilots in the U.S. should complete their training with the following in order to be competitive and have the BEST chance of getting that first job:

 

CFII

175 hours in the R22.

25 hours in the R44.

 

This will give you the hours and experience to meet SFAR 73 in order to be able to teach in Robinson products.

 

It makes a HUGE difference what aircraft you train in. Although the S300 and Enstrom are good helicopters to fly and train in, the reality is that 95% of all flight schools in the US are using the R22 and R44. If you want to become a career pilot, by not training in Robinson products, you will have effectively cut yourself out of 95% of the 'first job' job market. Those are not odds I would want to start off with in an already competitive job market.

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No more than 25hrs in the r44! The rest in the r22. If you have extra time left to get to 200hrs do more CFI training that's the ONLY training that will benefit you!!!

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With what Lynn said. That's the reality of it. Your first actual job will be flying a piston, and it will more than likely be in a Robinson. Build your Robinson time, get your training all the way through CFII, get both of your SFAR 73 instruction sign offs for the R22 and R44, and network with other people as much as you can.

 

The external load, NVG, and mountain courses will come into play later on in your career, and whichever companies hire you for jobs, will train you accordingly and in their aircraft.

 

If its part of the VA training program you will be doing, I thoroughly enjoyed the external load course that I did.

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That depends on what it is going to cost you and what your alternatives are. I doubt it's gonna be the same cost, and imho, people put way too much emphasis on if it's a turbine or not (not to even get me started on multi engine vs single engine). In your early training, you have way more important things to worry about and learn other than if you burn jet a or avgas. You should be focused on things like regs, airspace, navigation, etc.

 

Usually the only people who think turbines are better for training are the people that either aren't paying for training, or the people who are trying to up sell the turbine training.

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For my commercial time, the school is giving me the option to do it in a turbine helicopter. So a little over a 100 hrs in a turbine. Is this going to hurt or help me? Or neither?

Its going to hurt you. Nobody cares about 100hrs of turbine time. You will finish up your training and end up as a completely unemployable low time CFII who cant compete with a 200hr R22/R44 CFII for a job. People get hired all the time into the Gulf and tours with no turbine time. Its a total scam. So is any NVG courses or external load courses they offer. By the time you ever get a job doing anything with NVGs you will be so far out of currency it wont even be worth mentioning you did it.

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Something tells me the said school is ULA....

 

You also should take into consideration on the possibility that if you don't get hired by your school, you will have to attempt to get hired at another school. Not all schools have turbine aircraft to train in, therefore the more piston time you have, the better standing chance you have to not only to get hired by the school that trained you, but by almost ANY school across the country.

 

Don't put all of your eggs in one basket. Have a couple different backup plans incase the first plan doesn't work out.

Edited by RagMan
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Something tells me the said school is ULA....

 

You also should take into consideration on the possibility that if you don't get hired by your school, you will have to attempt to get hired at another school. Not all schools have turbine aircraft to train in, therefore the more piston time you have, the better standing chance you have to not only to get hired by the school that trained you, but by almost ANY school across the country.

 

Don't put all of your eggs in one basket. Have a couple different backup plans incase the first plan doesn't work

 

It is ULA. Need a school that is working with a College so I can use my GI Bill to it's fullest potential.

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Give it a pass and spend your time building experience in the airframe you'll be flying as a wet-ink CFI.

I used to swap airframes, Bells to Aerospatiales and back, on a previous job, with thousands of hours in each. It took a while each time... Stick to the types you're going to be flying.

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I am an instructor at Silverhawk Aviation in Idaho. We have a fully accredited college program that works with the GI Bill through TVCC. All training is done with Robinson Helicopters. PM me if your needing details.

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Other schools advertise turbines as well, leading edge and guidance are a few off the top of my head. Wether it is a benefit or not depends on the path you take and what opportunities may come up for you. Take the advise given, look into what you think is best for your situation and meat your goals. When doing so consider aircraft availability, you need to fly a minimum 3 times a week on average to finish a lab in the semester. Also know that once you choose an airframe and you get your funding for the semester, you are locked into that until you finish the lab.

 

Since you were released under honorable conditions, you could look into WOFT, re-join the ranks and never fly a piston powered aircraft... Plenty of discussion about that can be found in these forums.

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Other schools advertise turbines as well, leading edge and guidance are a few off the top of my head. Wether it is a benefit or not depends on the path you take and what opportunities may come up for you. Take the advise given, look into what you think is best for your situation and meat your goals. When doing so consider aircraft availability, you need to fly a minimum 3 times a week on average to finish a lab in the semester. Also know that once you choose an airframe and you get your funding for the semester, you are locked into that until you finish the lab.

 

Since you were released under honorable conditions, you could look into WOFT, re-join the ranks and never fly a piston powered aircraft... Plenty of discussion about that can be found in these forums.

Got about 70/80lbs to lose before I could make WOFT happen(I'm already working on getting under 230 from 250 by May) and I'm 33 yrs old. Pretty sure I'm already to old or damn near there.

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That adds a bit of a different angle, you will not be able to fly the R22, actually many students can't at that location due to weight and the DA there. If you did, you wouldn't be able to carry enough fuel to fly a worthwhile lesson. I was 185 during my private pilot training and there were days in the summer when I really had to depend on ETL to take off, and this was at the Salt Lake location.

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Got about 70/80lbs to lose before I could make WOFT happen(I'm already working on getting under 230 from 250 by May) and I'm 33 yrs old. Pretty sure I'm already to old or damn near there.

 

Max seat weight in the 22 is 240lbs so if you can find a light CFI you can still train in it, just keep in mind that many jobs post weight limits of 200lbs and that's tours and some ems ads I've seen. For flight instruction you'll have a pretty hard time finding work above 185lbs!

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Weight issues are exactly why the 300 has a place in flight training and is a better option than all r22/44 time. (If you are over 200+). Yes your career options in the flight training market are limited.. But not out, nor would it make sense to fly only a 44 or a turbine

Edited by apiaguy
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Choose a school that will help you get your first job. The first 500 hours are the hardest to get and are absolutely critical if your are going to succeed. You are not too old but you also don't have any time to waste. Don't choose a school that will fluff the VA with turbine time and other stuff. Sure, it will be a blast but it isn't going to help you in the long run. You must be willing to sacrifice and at this point it may require relocation to go to a good school.

 

Most schools use the 22. Learn to fly the 22. It's that simple.

 

Your weight is a factor and to be competitive once you hit the job market you have to AT LEAST be under 200. 180 is better.

 

Good luck

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Got about 70/80lbs to lose before I could make WOFT happen(I'm already working on getting under 230 from 250 by May) and I'm 33 yrs old. Pretty sure I'm already to old or damn near there.

Your weight is an issue for operating an R22 anywhere above sea-level…… Worse yet will be finding work when you finish….. That said, focus on losing the weight. If you’re unable to get below 200-ish, then you’ll need to reconsider this endeavor. And, as a warning, VA schools will sell you on the idea that flying the R44 is the solution for your weight issue. Don’t buy this snake oil as it’s not reality. Besides, one other VR member has the one-and-only seat when it comes available and he has seniority……

 

If you can get at or below the 200 mark, I suggest a diet and fitness program staring yesterday…….

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In my opinion, at a minimum, new pilots in the U.S. should complete their training with the following in order to be competitive and have the BEST chance of getting that first job:

 

CFII

175 hours in the R22.

25 hours in the R44.

 

This will give you the hours and experience to meet SFAR 73 in order to be able to teach in Robinson products.

 

It makes a HUGE difference what aircraft you train in. Although the S300 and Enstrom are good helicopters to fly and train in, the reality is that 95% of all flight schools in the US are using the R22 and R44. If you want to become a career pilot, by not training in Robinson products, you will have effectively cut yourself out of 95% of the 'first job' job market. Those are not odds I would want to start off with in an already competitive job market.

When LB gives you personal advice. You listen. This man knows what gets people hired in this industry.

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Well, this thread here has sure opened my eyes up to the whole "piston vs.turbine" thing rattling through my brain.
Like the poster with the weight issue, I'm slowly beginning to get down to the 200 mark and under in due time.
Fruits, water, and weight training 3-4x a week for the past two months has already made some clothes feel looser.

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Over 100hrs in a turbine! Looks like we found the next Silver State.

Hi,

 

Good to hear that people are now trying to get exposure to new things in aviation market. Other type of training pilot can opt for are Mountain flight training, fire fighting training or agricultural flight training. Coming into the helicopter models for primary training Robinson R-22 and for advanced training Robinson R-44 is more feasible to go for. CCA offers varied aviation courses. For more info visit http://chartercollegeaviation.com

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